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Discussion Starter #1
I am returning to riding, hopefully.
My SF1098 is 2010 but it only has 4500-ish miles. For the last few years, I could not ride it (family, work, housework, back problems, etc.), but this year I made it one of my goals to overcome the challenges and return to riding.
While the bike was in storage all this time, I did do annual oil change, wash, and chain lube. I also did at least one-two rides/year around my neighborhood to check how it is running or to get milk for kids.
I am definitely overdue for belt change, break fluid bleed, and tires (still have 2010 tires on it which are in good shape but probably old), and new gas.

What else do you recommend checking, changing,etc.?
Thanks in advance.
GR
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You covered almost everything, maybe change clutch fluid while you're in there and clean the clutch.
How to clean the clutch? Take it out and sweep inside and plates? Never done it so will appreciate any pointers here.
 

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How to clean the clutch? Take it out and sweep inside and plates? Never done it so will appreciate any pointers here.
Disassemble, clean dust, if there's rust or glazing on the plates use a sand paper on them, reinstall same order as removed, be sure the bearing of the pressure plate is OK, align pressure plate correctly (there's a dot on pressure plate matching slotted post on inner hub) and don't tighten the springs bolts hard, they screw in butter.

Watch videos, read service manual, search threads, its easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Disassemble, clean dust, if there's rust or glazing on the plates use a sand paper on them, reinstall same order as removed, be sure the bearing of the pressure plate is OK, align pressure plate correctly (there's a dot on pressure plate matching slotted post on inner hub) and don't tighten the springs bolts hard, they screw in butter.

Watch videos, read service manual, search threads, its easy.
I have been tackling these items one by one and next is the clutch. after watching YouTube on clutch removal, it seems taking pressure plate with rod and clutch plates Is easy; however other parts (flywheel? and basket) seem to require special tools. Do these need to be removed and cleaned too?
 

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I have been tackling these items one by one and next is the clutch. after watching YouTube on clutch removal, it seems taking pressure plate with rod and clutch plates Is easy; however other parts (flywheel? and basket) seem to require special tools. Do these need to be removed and cleaned too?
I would just take the clutch pack out at most and clean it, inspect steel discs for rust is really be about the only reason to pull it apart, basket you can inspect, no need to remove unless worn and needing replaced but with low miles very unlikely just inspect it for wear when the plates are out. Rust is more of an issue if you had an open cover on it or if you stored it where it was humid. Ultimately I probably wouldn't even bother (maybe pull the cover and just inspect it for rust and make sure it is working when you pull the clutch) I would just run it, any surface rust will come off quickly and anything more you will feel pretty much right away, as long as it isn't sticking I would just see how it feels and ride it - maybe start it on a stand and put it in gear and see if the clutch releases ok first before riding so there is no excitement the first time you put it in gear.
I would add to your list and on top of what others have suggested to change the coolant if you haven't in a while and especially if you have the old stuff that eats metal that they had a service bulletin on, get the new stuff in it. I would also drain the fuel and run new stuff and check and clean your air filter and maybe change if original.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I would just take the clutch pack out at most and clean it, inspect steel discs for rust is really be about the only reason to pull it apart, basket you can inspect, no need to remove unless worn and needing replaced but with low miles very unlikely just inspect it for wear when the plates are out. Rust is more of an issue if you had an open cover on it or if you stored it where it was humid. Ultimately I probably wouldn't even bother (maybe pull the cover and just inspect it for rust and make sure it is working when you pull the clutch) I would just run it, any surface rust will come off quickly and anything more you will feel pretty much right away, as long as it isn't sticking I would just see how it feels and ride it - maybe start it on a stand and put it in gear and see if the clutch releases ok first before riding so there is no excitement the first time you put it in gear.
I would add to your list and on top of what others have suggested to change the coolant if you haven't in a while and especially if you have the old stuff that eats metal that they had a service bulletin on, get the new stuff in it. I would also drain the fuel and run new stuff and check and clean your air filter and maybe change if original.
I noticed my clutch was slipping last year when I rode the bike last. Not much and only noticeable when i start moving. My clutch cover is open style from rizoma. The bike has only 5k miles.
Do you think my clutch is ‘gone’ or it is still ok?
 

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5k miles is not much, hard to wear it out that quick, would maybe pull it and see if it has glazed and like someone above mentions, clean them up and sand them a little, check the metal plates with a straight edge to make sure they are not warped and re-assemble.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Disassembled the clutch.
Don't seem to see much dust and not seeing any glazing.
Plates seem to be in good order. I see some rust/dirt on the edges of friction plates but thats about it.
I will give them light rub with a sandpaper just to make sure nothing is there (don't want to take them off again - what a pain to do with just 2 screw drivers).

I now have some noob questions - and i looked at youtube but found nothing -
1. should the plain steel plates be sanded/de-glazed too?
2. what order to put these plates back into the basket? I did put them in order they came off, but I might have messed up one or two in terms of the order. Would appreciate a link to DIY/youtube if you have one.
3. the steel plates have cut outs. So, when installing the plates, is direction/position of the cutouts important?
4. Pressure Plate springs - when to stop tightening them? in my research I learned hand tight them then add 4-6lbs. The problem is the springs pushing back create illusion the bolt is tight. Is there a tick to tighten the spring bolts properly?
 

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986760


Here's a snap from the workshop manual for the order of the pack.

for the other questions

1. I actually only sand the steel plates, but not a crazy amount. I actually just rub the plates on rough cement floor to give it a scrape.
2. above
3. I'm not sure of the purpose of the cutouts but I have put them back unaligned with the others and aligned and felt no difference.
4. just screw the fasteners in until you can't any more, and tighten maybe a quarter turn after. Nothing specific.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you jermoe. Without an answer here, I went ahead today and put the plates onto the basket. Now with the diagram, I can certainly say I might have not put them in correct order (2mm vs 1.5mm) or way (dished plate).

regarding sanding - after further inspection I realize there was glazing on both types of plates.
Steel plates - I only lightly touched steel plates with sandpaper (220). It barely made a difference but I was under impression these must have polished-like finish from the factory, at least it appears to me to like it.
Friction plates - I sanded them with 220 sandpaper as well just to remove the glaze cover. They also appear to have a some dirt buildup. With my sanding I removed some of it at least to level the dirt with the friction material areas.
Spring bolts, I kind of figured that tension is different when you get to the end of it.

oh well will take everything apart tomorrow to put the plates in correct order. That diagram is gold.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update: I took it apart and put it back in accordance with the diagram. However for the life of me I could not find that purple plate easily. I identified that one of the 1.5mm plates was slightly different in finish and there was something weird about it, so I designed it to be the purple steel plate.

question: will I know right away (after bike start or during take off) if the clutch plates not installed properly?

p.s. haven’t tried anything yet as my 3 year old put a bunch of rocks inside exhaust.... it looks like to take the bike out this year is taking longer than ever...,
 

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Update: I took it apart and put it back in accordance with the diagram. However for the life of me I could not find that purple plate easily. I identified that one of the 1.5mm plates was slightly different in finish and there was something weird about it, so I designed it to be the purple steel plate.

question: will I know right away (after bike start or during take off) if the clutch plates not installed properly?

p.s. haven’t tried anything yet as my 3 year old put a bunch of rocks inside exhaust.... it looks like to take the bike out this year is taking longer than ever...,
You’ll know if the plates are incorrect
 
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