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Hell I hope you are wrong
My reasoning are based on the fact that its core is starting from a very low weight (but so to was the 1200), but more interesting is that I have read that the V4 will be sold along side the 1260 not replacing the 1260
The multi range will now be very wide IE, enduro for more off road, normal multi for general use and touring, and V4 for sports orientated use, I would expect this will replace the pikes peak with basically no off road capability.
I'm with you... I think a sub 450lb dry Multi is a selling plus, I just don't think Ducati thinks so.
 

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I think the feedback in this thread would be really helpful to Ducati in evaluating why the 950 has never sold well. Multistrada buyers tend to not be the most price conscious shoppers, so saving a few thousand dollars to get a bike with less power and the same weight, isn't very attractive.

If they could figure out a way to make a sport focused, 410-420lb dry 950, that would be one hell of a bike. Probably too expensive to build, though.
 

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I could be the devil's advocate here and even contradict what i previously wrote. While the V4 engine is heavier than the V2, the V4 frame is aluminum vs the V2 steel Trellis.
This could equalize the difference and could possibly make a Multistrada V4 lighter albeit marginally.
 

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Im also 50 something. I currently have have a 2010 multi. I had a 2013 previously which I bought to ride out to sturgis from FL a few years ago. I sold it after the trip and bought a 959 (had the superbike itch). I ended up trading the 959 in to my dealer for the 2010 multi which had very low mileage and was in like new condition. I was upside down on the 959 so I "Lost money" on the deal but have no regrets. I have a big smile on my face everytime I ride it since the power is great, the seating position is comfortable, I can strap some stuff onto the rear seat area or bring my wife, and I can ride for a few hrs without running out of gas. Both my models (2010 and the 2013) have a keyless fob glitch - it often cannot sense the key when its in my pocket so I have to hold it near the dash to get it to come on and then when im riding it will flash "no key" after I put it back in my pocket. Other than that - both have been rock solid reliable. I have on a kaoko throttle lock since the cruise control was not added until 2014.
 

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I have traditionally never kept a bike longer than 2-3 years so as to keep current and keep the upgrade cost manageable. And so I have tested and evaluated every subsequent model since buying my 2012 Sport, with a view to upgrading. 8 years and 65,000km later, I still have the same bike and at this time have no plan to upgrade. I believe I can add some value to the question asked by sburns2421 initial post in this thread. I am 62 years old and have been riding non-stop since I was 18 and have ridden every type of bike, from trials to supersport. I enjoy fast canyon carving, fast, backroad adventure sport touring (Happy to take the odd gravel road when necessary, but don't seek them out on my Multi.

Back problems pushed me from my 1098 to a Multi. I bought my 2012 MTS Sport as a runout just before the introduction of the Skyhook, twinspark model in 2013. 2012 was the end of the electronically adjustable Ohlins suspension era. Despite the alleged sophistication of the Sachs Skyhook, my view and experience was that the quality and maintainability of the Ohlins made it a better choice both in terms of ride quality and ownership; something that I still hold with. I addressed some of the shortcomings of the bike as I saw them, with a few aftermarket options, notably Tuneboy for cruise control and improved fueling. Notwithstanding the questionable customer support and endless, repetitive forum posts and complaints about Tuneboy, it is a fantastic product once up and running. It completely sorts out the low RPM fueling harshness and roughness and gives an unequaled dollop of bottom/midrange torque; not to mention a superb cruise control function. I did the installation myself with no problems at all - just followed the instructions and kept calm!

Here are my assessments of each Multistrada iteration since my purchase, based on riding each one.

2013-2104 Skyhook: I spent 10 days on a European tour on a 2013 and at the end of that was not convinced that the Skyhook was better for the rider. Better for Ducati margins probably, but not for the rider. Verdict: not worth upgrading to.
20015 - 2018 DVT: Ridden back to back, the DVT simply did not live up to the promise of its engine technology.The DVT engine disappointingly lost its bottom end and for riding the tight twisty back road stuff I really enjoy was a step backward. Less vibration, fueling better than the standard older engine - diabolical seat, desmo service costs higher. Verdict: definitely not worth upgrading to.
2017 Multi Enduro: OK bike given the DVT engine issues. Bulky and road handling not quite good enough for me. The potential cost of repairs in the event of an off-road getoff did not sit well with me.
1260 DVT: Engine and quick shifter are fabulous (finally) as is the latest iteration of the dash controls and display. A touch less agile but most riders wouldn't notice . Worth upgrading? From a riding standpoint, yes. Would I do it? Considering that it would cost me ~ $20,000 Australian to do; no. Considering what I have, its not worth the investment. I'd rather spend the money on going on more riding trips and a 2nd lightweight adventure bike, such as a Tenere 700 or KTM 790R either of which is less cost brand new!

All through its evolution, the Multi has gotten heavier and heavier as noted elsewhere.

Here are some other factors that argue in favour of the 2012 Sport in terms of the list of options originally posted:
  • Reliability. I have had no issues other than the failure of the transmission selector tension spring. (A known Ducati transmission weak point) I know several 2012 Multi owners who have over 100,000 km on their bikes, and are still happy with them. The manufacturing issues that plagued some of the early 1200 Multi's are not part of the 2012 MY ownership picture whatsoever! I have taken my bike on several 8,000+ km trips with full confidence.
  • Maintainability. There are plenty of reasonably priced used spare parts available should you ever need anything.
  • Bang for buck. Simply unbeatable. Use the savings to buy one or two aftermarket accessories such as a custom seat, Tuneboy (if you cant buy one without it already fitted) and spring upgrades. Depending on your weight, you may find the OEM springs too soft, as I did. I bought firmer springs which definitely improved the already good suspension for me. I weigh 90Kg (~200lb)
When it came out, the 1200 Multi was a revelation, a superb bike with no equal for the intended purpose. That has not changed even though there are more options today. The original 1200 Multi's are still fabulous bikes to ride in 2020. Of course there are faster bikes now but mostly that's a rider factor not a bike factor anyway. In terms of the best performance, handling, comfort compromise, the Multi is hard to beat. So which is the best model to get? I would opt for a 2012 Pikes Peak if available. The lighter, stronger forged wheels do give a slight handling advantage if you are really into canyon carving as I am.
 

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@evan3161 Not sure why you have such a poor opinion of the 1200 DVT's...

I test rode a 1260 back to back with my 2016 S Touring and honestly didn't find there was enough to justify the extra money (the 2016 I bought was 7k off MSRP with 20km on it) so I bought the 1200. WIth the money I saved I bought a arrow cat delete and will be buying a rapid bike evo blipper in the spring.

But hey, opinions can differ.
 

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It seems like you have already thought it through. Its a good move if you are trying to move in a progressive direction in your motorcycling chapter. For me, 2012 was always the best year. All the bugs and issues that plagued 10-11 were addressed and it was also the last year Ohlins took care of our butts and backs. Def a special bike in that aspect. Skyhook wasnt bad but it just wasnt Ohlins.

Let me know when you get serious about locking one down. Mine is up for sale in my sig, check it out.
 

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Im also 50 something. I currently have have a 2010 multi. I had a 2013 previously which I bought to ride out to sturgis from FL a few years ago. I sold it after the trip and bought a 959 (had the superbike itch). I ended up trading the 959 in to my dealer for the 2010 multi which had very low mileage and was in like new condition. I was upside down on the 959 so I "Lost money" on the deal but have no regrets. I have a big smile on my face everytime I ride it since the power is great, the seating position is comfortable, I can strap some stuff onto the rear seat area or bring my wife, and I can ride for a few hrs without running out of gas. Both my models (2010 and the 2013) have a keyless fob glitch - it often cannot sense the key when its in my pocket so I have to hold it near the dash to get it to come on and then when im riding it will flash "no key" after I put it back in my pocket. Other than that - both have been rock solid reliable. I have on a kaoko throttle lock since the cruise control was not added until 2014.
Have you tried replacing the key fob battery, they seem to last about 2 years.
 

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We all have our opinions and a lot of it depends on how we ride. For me the DVT and Skyhook were a clear choice (and I'd not change my choice today knowing what both models are good at)... I use Skyhook to reconfigure for various uses frequently. Touring, rough stuff, sport riding can be selected on the go. The semi-active Ohlins would obviously be even better... but I'd always select skyhook over base because it's a feature I use frequently and get a LOT of value out of. If it was a track bike that would be different... but mine is touring, commuting, and finally sport riding (but on varying surfaces where sometimes sport mode isn't the right choice)... flexibility is important for me.

The other selling point for the DVT (and the primary reason I never seriously considered buying a used or leftover 14) is the upgraded IMU based traction control... and it's saved my ass a couple times (it's been very good at saving me from unexpected mid-corner sand/dirt). For touring I don't care how much of a Rossi you are - there will be times during thousand mile days when your brain is elsewhere and having safety features MAY be the difference between a nice ride and a substantially less nice one.

Reliability wise there's still no reason to assume the DVT isn't as reliable as the pre-DVT Multi's... so far so good it appears. Service is about the same to a bit more expensive... so no real argument either way IMO.

So choose based on what you need, they're all good but each has different things to offer and you can optimize based on your personal preferences.
 

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I agree with DaveK on just about everything, the other thing that I would say the DVT did a lot better than the previous Multi's is the LED lights (maybe that's just an S thing, I'm no expert at the multi range)

Coming from an S1000R to the DVT was almost literally night and day.
 

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I agree with DaveK on just about everything, the other thing that I would say the DVT did a lot better than the previous Multi's is the LED lights (maybe that's just an S thing, I'm no expert at the multi range)

Coming from an S1000R to the DVT was almost literally night and day.
I don't ride at night very often because the crazy number of deer... but yes good point regarding headlights, the DVT's are much improved in that dept also.
 

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I’ve ridden a lot of bikes. The sport bikes are a blast on the track, but I don’t know how anyone deals with them for everyday riding. The Multi gives you all day rideability; and then you are your own limit out on track. I’m a mid-group intermediate rider, but I’ve seen guys down right embarrass people on Multistradas with all the electronics turned off. The Multistrada is the only constant in my garage.
 

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I have owned Ducati superbikes for nearly 24 years now. 851 bought in '96. 999 bought in '05 (sold in '10 and bought back the exact machine again in '16), and 1299S bought in '18.

So I am used to generally uncomfortable ergonomics (851), plenty of performance for the street (all), and nearly unbearable summer seat/engine heat (1299, 999).

47 today. Body at 23 (when I bought 851) is very different from middle-aged motorcyclist, I don't ride as often as I could. Superbikes normally are used on weekends and nice days. Did my first New Years ride this year in many years.

When the Multi came out in air-cooled and later 1200 form....I was unimpressed and never really considered it even a "real" Ducati. However, again and again as I consider adding another bike while a V4 Streetfighter or Panigale would be more of the same, something a bit different keeps popping in my mind. Namely a Hypermotard (would want an 1100S), Diavel, and the Multistrada 1200S of some form.

Hyper seems like fun and quite impractical, a lot like the superbikes I have now. Maybe not the best choice of the three.
Diavel is certainly different and looks like it would be very comfortable, but even its use would be somewhat limited.

But the Multi...maybe there is a bike that can do many things very well. Highway commuting & trips. Plenty fast (faster than anything I own but the 1299S animal in the garage), it certainly looks like it would be comfortable. I would want an S version of some form with ABS.

So which one? Please give feedback from your experience if this is inaccurate:
2010-11: original 1200. S has semi-active Ohlins. Some rumblings of heads needing to be replaced after 20k miles or so due to casting defect. non-S also available without ABS
2012: same as above without the head issues. Maybe the best value choice.
2013-2014? New Skyhook electronic suspension and dual-spark plug heads for smoother low-speed running and better fuel economy.
2015-18: DVT engine. TFT dash. I assume more electronics.

The bike that stands out as a pretty cool bike would be the 2017-18 Enduro Pro. Still quite expensive secondhand, but a very unique and cool version of the model. I am tall so the seat height would not be a big deal. 19" front wheel might mean different handling but I would likely also taking on easy off-road situations.

After my mom died last year I did the normal assessment of things I would like to do while I can with a new sense of urgency. One of the things I would like to try is a bit of "adventure" riding. Not difficult off-roading, sold my YZ450 a couple of years ago before I hurt myself. Gravel roads, maybe fire trails, easy off-road stuff. I am fortunate to live near Arkansas which promotes motorcycle tourism and actually have planned road & trail routes (maybe 150 miles each) that seem pretty neat. It would be cool to try to do all the routes in a year on the 15-odd weekends it would take to do all of them. The Enduro might be the perfect Ducati that could do all of them.

Anyway, sorry for the rambling, just looking for opinions on these bikes. New to the family.
As I younger man I rode Monsters of all engine displacements and ergonomics (clip ons, bar risers) to avoid the dismal utility of a proper superbike. Then I had an epiphany at 29 found an interest in adventure riding, and bought a BMW 650 Dakar. Rode it several years then sold it as my region didn't allow much adventure riding. I bought a bigger motor Monster. Moved to an open landscape, sold the monster, and bought an XR650L. While sturdy, the XR limited my delight while slabbing it to get to the off road regions. I sold the XR and bought a GS 1200 at age 36. The best purchased I've ever made, still after 80,000 miles and 7 years later. My Ducati love hasn't waned so I bought an additional Hyper EVO Corse, Monster S4R, and a 900SS. I entertained the Multistrada series but didn't think they were robust enough to survive areas where I have muscled the GS (my avatar is the Raceway at Death Valley where I lived on the GS for 4 days and rode over 1,000 miles).



In short, add to a solid base. 😎
 

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As I younger man I rode Monsters of all engine displacements and ergonomics (clip ons, bar risers) to avoid the dismal utility of a proper superbike. Then I had an epiphany at 29 found an interest in adventure riding, and bought a BMW 650 Dakar. Rode it several years then sold it as my region didn't allow much adventure riding. I bought a bigger motor Monster. Moved to an open landscape, sold the monster, and bought an XR650L. While sturdy, the XR limited my delight while slabbing it to get to the off road regions. I sold the XR and bought a GS 1200 at age 36. The best purchased I've ever made, still after 80,000 miles and 7 years later. My Ducati love hasn't waned so I bought an additional Hyper EVO Corse, Monster S4R, and a 900SS. I entertained the Multistrada series but didn't think they were robust enough to survive areas where I have muscled the GS (my avatar is the Raceway at Death Valley where I lived on the GS for 4 days and rode over 1,000 miles).



In short, add to a solid base. 😎
The biggest issue the Multi would have in Death Valley (I bummed around there quite a bit when I was living in Irvine) is the small diameter wheels... they make sand a seriously UNFUN task. The other advantage the GS has in soft stuff is the lovely low COG that makes you feel like the bike weighs a hundred pounds less than it does when you're manhandling it.

In my area where offroad in the summer is hard-pack and gravel the Multi does better but the GS still is the better bike in that element. Of course I'd rather have a KTM 790 or Tenere 700 than any super-heavyweight for that stuff. ;-)
 

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Have you tried replacing the key fob battery, they seem to last about 2 years.
yes its not the battery. Like I had stated both my 2013 and my 2010 do the same thing. The original owner of my 2013 had complained to the dealer and they actually replaced the fob under warrenty but it did nothing to improve the glitch.
 
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