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From what I was told when I bought my 2018, Ducati revealed some surprising data to the dealers assembled for the 1260 launch, information gathered from users of the Ducati Link app. The basic gist of it was that the average Multistrada owner rides more like a Harley Davidson owner, than a Panigale owner. The bikes rarely see redline, and when they do it's usually just a quick blast in 2nd gear. Average running RPM is sub 4k. Obviously that data would only apply to owners of the 2015+ models.

I wasn't there, so I can't speak to the accuracy of any of that, it's second hand knowledge of something that happened 2 years ago. But if that's true, it's not hard to see why Ducati has steered the bike away from sport, and towards touring. I'm talking here about feeling, not capability. No one who has ridden one will argue that the MTS, any year, isn't an extremely capable bike. The newer ones make you work for it in a way that a sport bike doesn't, though. Stability isn't free.
 

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I ride pretty aggressively for a ADV rider but even so I only spend appreciable time over 5000 rpm when I'm riding twisties and want immediate power on tap. Redline is ticket territory around here in anything other than first gear... so it's reserved for passing or occasional shenanigans. When I'm touring or commuting I'm not spending much time in go mode so yea 4k is about average.

I definitely agree you have to work harder on these bikes compared to more sportbike posture bikes (to go fast), but the Multi is better at it than the typical ADV fare (GS, Tiger, STen, etc...).
 
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Discussion Starter #23
Hey there Steve, Ive had my 2010 1200Touring Multi for 8 years now, longest time for a bike I've ever owned. 82,000kms now and been bullet proof. Don't ride it much nowadays, as i use mostly the 1290GT for fast touring and the 790 for hooning and trackdays. I never found the Multi that great on gravel (190 rear tire) but it will commute on gravel roads ok. Mine is mainly for touring now days with the wife. But i do love getting on the big Multi and cane it on our back roads, and its bloody fast and nimble for a big bike. If a lot of gravel is in your future any of the KTM adventurers would be better, especially the new 790 adventure, but they aren't Ducati's so may be sacralege this route. I love the big Multi, its my only Italian bike at the mo, and the early ones still have that rawness. Good luck choosing..............(ps, haven't been on here much lately, the new format is weird)
Dave it is good to hear how someone uses multiple bikes that appear for similar use on paper, but better suited for certain purposes.

Considering KTM too but local dealer closed a few months ago. Cousin just got an 1190 Adventure that is a couple of years old, I may try it out for comparison purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Was not aware the DVT complicated valve adjustments. I have always done them on the 851 and 999 (1299 has not needed it yet but that will likely go to the dealer). DVT would mean another bike that has to go to the dealer, and I may actually put miles on this one.

Interesting the 2010-12 models were the most aggressive and "raw", does that mean they are "better" in sport riding on the street? It seems like pre-DVT might be the way to go.

Some 2010-11 S models are temptingly cheap. I could buy an XR650L or DR650 for the dual-sport routes with the money left over.
 

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Same boat~ I'm 62 now and riding a 2000 900SSi.e. Love the bike, but can only manage an hour or two at a time. I need a more upright riding position. Been hanging onto low triple clamp bars for 30 years now. I had a 750 Paso before the current ride. I'll be watching~
Greg
 

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My guess is the new V4 Multi will take the bike back into a more light weight, sports orientated machine.
With that V4 it sure as hell wont be good at touring and would have been best used to reintroduce the ST line
 

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dddd the ST is dead. Its dead because nobody honestly wants one and the few guys that do want to see it come back are too cheap to ever buy a new one. It's dead because it will not sell. The touring genre works in the Multi because ADV style bikes sell and they sell very well.

As for the stats mentioned by AXSpwr, I used to ride my multi like a sportbike when I first got it but I have other bikes that fill that need now and the multi is used mainly for touring and 2-up. Having said that I still ride it at higher RPMs than most Harleys are capable of (dont they redline at like 3500? ?:poop:) And I still ride it much more aggressively than any Cruiser knob, even with a passenger. I kinda reject the statement that the average multi rider rides like Harley a rider. From actual experience out on the road I really doubt that. Even so, I do ride much more conservatively than I used to.
 

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I can tell you that my bike sees redline a lot, mainly because I'm still getting used to not having a bike that will do 13k+ lol
 

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Was not aware the DVT complicated valve adjustments. I have always done them on the 851 and 999 (1299 has not needed it yet but that will likely go to the dealer). DVT would mean another bike that has to go to the dealer, and I may actually put miles on this one.

Interesting the 2010-12 models were the most aggressive and "raw", does that mean they are "better" in sport riding on the street? It seems like pre-DVT might be the way to go.

Some 2010-11 S models are temptingly cheap. I could buy an XR650L or DR650 for the dual-sport routes with the money left over.
I'd say yes... you get more sport focus and less weight, you give up touring refinement and some safety features. IMO the Ohlins PP 1200 is a great "big bike" for getting into trouble on. That's assuming you like the character of twins - if you don't care about that then (don't tell anyone I said so) coughS1000XRcough.
 

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I still own and enjoy my ST3, but I will agree that nobody wants a new one. ADV bikes like the Multi are the new sport tourers and have effectively killed the segment. Having ridden the earlier Multi, the DVT is light years better, active suspension and cornering ABS, TFT dash, all work for me. The bike may be heavier, but it carries that weight well, but I'm also 40 lbs lighter lol. At 5 10 I appreciate the narrow waist that allows me to flat foot it. A KTM? I looked at them sure, but hey lack of factory support for the dealers and a host of niggling issues (I know a wrench locally) left me cold. Best ADV for the buck a Tenere, best sports tourer...Multistrada...any flavour.
 

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I would be shocked if the V4 Multi wasn't even heavier and larger than the 1260. And more powerful, with more tech. It's just the nature of this segment of the market. Ducati has other bikes in their lineup that overlap into the space occupied by the big MTS, from the more off-road focused 950 MTS to the more sport, less touring SuperSport. Neither of those models existed when the current iteration of Multistrada came out, so it doesn't seem like the Multi becoming more tour focused is an accident.
 

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I'd say yes... you get more sport focus and less weight, you give up touring refinement and some safety features. IMO the Ohlins PP 1200 is a great "big bike" for getting into trouble on. That's assuming you like the character of twins - if you don't care about that then (don't tell anyone I said so) coughS1000XRcough.
I suppose so, if you dont mind your hands and arms going numb enough to completely loose all sense of feeling after about 20 minutes of riding...
 

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Yup, even to this day (not sure about the new 2020 XR) those things have killer buzz at around 5 or 6k... My 2017 "R" had rubber dampers under the handlebar clamp and the bars were still pretty buzzy.
 

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Great discussion thanks for this. I'm nearly 65 and like others here I have come from 2 stroke dirtbikes & early roadbikes to Ducati superbikes - and now ride about annually cos of the ghastly ergonomics. Wish I still had my 70's stable of Yamaha 2 strokes (sigh). All I want is fast 0-100 (kph - 60mph) and fun. I was thinking Hypermotard as a present to my-good-self but maybe a Multi makes sense. Or maybe I keep looking forlornly for that good RT1-3.
 

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I’m 51 and I’ve been riding sport bikes for decades. I was worried about making the switch as well. I bought a 2014 multi and have never looked back.

My street riding began with my 86 ninja 600R in 1987. I started riding Ducatis in 2000 and have had numerous including an S4 monster, 996, 1098, and a few Panigales but I use my 2017 Multi for nearly everything. It’s extremely fast for the road and way more comfortable than my previous commuter, a ZX10R.

You won’t regret it.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I think if Ducati just took Wes Siler's quote at this point in the video, they would have had their ad campaign...
 

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I'm 57, and raced in my 40's on 749R, 848, 1098, and a variety of others. I now do trackdays several times a year on my 2016 RSV4.

I've owned two different Multistradas - a 2010 S Touring that I put over 30,000 miles on, and now a 2016 Pikes Peak that's up to about 13K. I also have a Tuono Factory and 2016 Hypermotard 939 SP for the street, but the Multi is my sport-touring bike. And these bikes can be ridden hard! I can't tell you how much fun I've had, riding them like a big, comfortable sportbike. Yes, they're heavy, and tall, and big - but they are so much fun and ridiculously capable. I was able to ride my 2010 on the track several times, and it sure was fun to see the reaction of sportbike guys when I'd pass them on this giant bike with wide handlebars.

My wish for years has been that Aprilia would make a sexy sport-touring bike with the V4 from the Tuono (or similar), but that hasn't happened. I'm looking forward to seeing what (and if) Ducati will come up with using a V4 for this platform. In the meantime, I love big twins too, and have been extremely pleased with mine. I've done a bunch of trips with sportbike guys and racers, and have never felt like the Multi was holding me back.
 

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My guess is the new V4 Multi will take the bike back into a more light weight, sports orientated machine.
With that V4 it sure as hell wont be good at touring and would have been best used to reintroduce the ST line
I'll bet you a beer the V4 multi is at least 10lbs heavier than the 1260. Ducati COULD make it lighter... I just don't think they will.
 
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I'll bet you a beer the V4 multi is at least 10lbs heavier than the 1260. Ducati COULD make it lighter... I just don't think they will.
I would agree with that. The Panigale V4S weighs 384 dry while the 1299S is 17 lbs lighter at 367.
Since I'm loading stats, the MTS1260PP weighs 454.
 

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I'll bet you a beer the V4 multi is at least 10lbs heavier than the 1260. Ducati COULD make it lighter... I just don't think they will.
Hell I hope you are wrong
My reasoning are based on the fact that its core is starting from a very low weight (but so to was the 1200), but more interesting is that I have read that the V4 will be sold along side the 1260 not replacing the 1260
The multi range will now be very wide IE, enduro for more off road, normal multi for general use and touring, and V4 for sports orientated use, I would expect this will replace the pikes peak with basically no off road capability.
 
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