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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Morning to the West, Good Day to the East ( of the world that is).

I searched but I couldn't find any relative threads.
Has any of you had any experience with lubricating the Swing Arm? Did you have to take it off the bike?
How difficult is it?
Is there any write up (with pictures if possible) that you can point me to?
Any tips that you wish to recommend?
Has any one tried to put a grease nipple on the SA, to make life easier for the next time.

Thanks all
 

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I did mine on my 2005 ST3 this summer. It's not hard, just tedious removing all that stuff to get at it, wheel, rear brake, hugger, shock, link arm, shifter pedal assembly, the whole exhaust system. The only "tricky" part is to pay attention how the shims come out. There are shims on both sides but any extra shims go on one particular side to keep the chain aligned with the counter shaft and rear sprocket. Pay attention when they come out and replace them the same way, the extra shim(s) are supposed to go on the right side, but mine came out with the extra shims on the left side as opposed to the right so that's how I refitted them. There's a certain amount of axial clearance/play, 0.1 mm, as per the manual: "when a .010 mm feeler gauge or shim is hard to fit there is no need to shim the shaft." The axle is held in place on both sides by circlips. They are spring steel so be careful you don't launch them when you pull them out. :) I think I had to remove 2 of the center stands mounting bolts, not the one that goes through the engine, to get at the pinch bolts which are just plain bolts. Good luck. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Stryder,

I got discouraged with all the staff you have to move.
Q1. Could I insert a rod, close to the dimensions of the axle and use the push-pull method, and lubricate simultaneously. Is it feasible?

Q2. If I follow your method. did you observe the possibility to put a grease nipple, either on the axle or the swing arm?

Thanks mate
 

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Hi Stryder,

I got discouraged with all the staff you have to move.
Q1. Could I insert a rod, close to the dimensions of the axle and use the push-pull method, and lubricate simultaneously. Is it feasible?

Q2. If I follow your method. did you observe the possibility to put a grease nipple, either on the axle or the swing arm?

Thanks mate
The swing arm bearings are in the engine cases and the pivot shaft is inserted thru the swing arm and engine cases. The only way to lubricate this is to remove the pivot shaft.
 

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Hi Stryder,

I got discouraged with all the staff you have to move.
Q1. Could I insert a rod, close to the dimensions of the axle and use the push-pull method, and lubricate simultaneously. Is it feasible?

Q2. If I follow your method. did you observe the possibility to put a grease nipple, either on the axle or the swing arm?

Thanks mate
Well I removed everything because I also wanted to lube the shock pivot points as well, and to clean things up a bit, and take a general look etc. after 7 years. Doing it your way, which was how I replaced my rear engine bolts though I did support the engine from the bottom, would simply grease the axle shaft not the bearings as va duc mentions, and most of the grease would get wiped off sliding it back in, nor could you address/shim-up any excessive axial play if the bike's been used hard. In my case, after 30K miles, I didn't find it dry or loose or anything else that gave me cause for alarm, other than normal grit build up on the outside, but I was glad I took the time to clean and lube all the suspension pivot points down there. If I have the bike for another 7 years, then I'll do it again. :) SA pivots I mean, shock pivots I had already done/would do more often. :)

The zerk fitting idea would be a possiblity, but I think you'd still have to pull it all apart to then pull the bearings to drill the cases and maybe the needle bearing shell too if they have an outer shell. :)

BTW, 200*6* ST*4*s? 2005 was the last year for the 4s afaik. Is that a European thing, ie 2005 MY sold as a 2006 MY? :confused:
 

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The zerk fitting idea would be a possiblity, but I think you'd still have to pull it all apart to then pull the bearings to drill the cases and maybe the needle bearing shell too if they have an outer shell.
My personal opinion here is for the effort and even possibility of causing some damage to the engine cases and bearings by drilling them out it is best just left as is. There isn't really a great need here. You can go years with out doing it, some never do it. Add to that, they are caged needle bearings on both sides, not sure how you'd drill those out without destroying them. If they were plain bearings, maybe...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you both lads, it's crystal clear, if you want to catch fish you have to....
I will think of it after I take a good look, with the bike on my friends ramp.

BTW, 200*6* ST*4*s? 2005 was the last year for the 4s afaik. Is that a European thing, ie 2005 MY sold as a 2006 MY?
Not Exactly ( if they take first license 2006, they are referred to as 06)

Thanks again
 

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..Not Exactly ( if they take first license 2006, they are referred to as 06)

Thanks again
Hmm, so if I was over there and found a new, yet to be registered 2004 ST and bought it, it would be a considered 2012? :) Cool. :cool:
 

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My personal opinion here is for the effort and even possibility of causing some damage to the engine cases and bearings by drilling them out it is best just left as is. There isn't really a great need here. You can go years with out doing it, some never do it. Add to that, they are caged needle bearings on both sides, not sure how you'd drill those out without destroying them. If they were plain bearings, maybe...
Agreed. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Production year and first registration combined, make up the bike's resale value.
I think it is rational.

Thanks again
 

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I'm in the process of doing mine on the ST2, I am going to get the swing arm powder coated as it's starting to corrode. I had no problems with greasing up the ST4S arm, which I did last year. I have a few jobs that need doing anyway like the exhausts need cleaning up and the down pipes are going to be sprayed.

John
 

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Hello

I was doing a rebuild on a S4R motor (same as a ST4S motor) that had the left side swingarm bearings totally froze up in the case.
I guessed that the P.O. left the bike on the sidestand in the rain pretty regularly and completely neglected lubrication of the swingarm bearings. It was an '05 model bike.
Changing-out the rusted-together mass of shite was a lot more trouble than one might think.
They're held in place with these strange circlips apparently designed to defeat any prankster or vandal who might have designs on removing them. They have angled ends, no "eyes" or holes to attach circlip pliers to, and the access is horrible. There are two rows of needle bearings with delicate seals on each end, held in place with these Houdini-designed circlips.
And, of course, everything has to be special-ordered.

My point? Lube those friggin' swingarm bearings!
 
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