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Discussion Starter #1
so i just moved. i used to live in a converted barn with big doors to my living room, so my 749 sat right next to my work desk. it was heated, i could work on it, it sat on a tender, perfect. now i live in a small apartment with no garage (pittsburgh) and im wondering what my options are aside from paying monthly for a garage. my first thought was the buy a van and put it inside. does anyone keep their duc outside?

has anyone sold their bike because they had no way of taking care of it?
 

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Old Wizard
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The problem here is that moisture condenses on cold motorcycle parts when the surrounding air is humid, the exact condition you have in an unheated garage (or van) during a winter day when the sun warms the air and there’s melting snow adding moisture to the surrounding air. Picture the moisture from the warm air condensing on the outside of a cold drink on a summer’s day. Moisture that condenses on steel accelerates rusting and promotes galvanic corrosion between dissimilar materials.

So you can keep moist air away by using wax, WD-40 (oil) or silicone spray to protect against corrosion but it leaves a mess to clean up.

The only real solution is a heated enclosure.
 

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I have a 2 car garage I keep mine in under a cover but this winter I am also worried about the moisture, especially the digital guage.

I live in a 2bd room apartment that is over my garage and I'm considering getting like 4 friends and getting the Duc up the outside stairs so I can park it in my living room for the winter. For where I live though it would only be like November until March when it gets below 40 degrees at night.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
im afraid im going to have to bring it into the apartment this winter too, but last winter any warmish day (+40) i would take it out for a ride, and with my apartment, that just won't be possible.
 

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Old Wizard
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It’s not just the bike's exterior components that’s of concern here.

The other issue is that starting the engine produces water vapor in ithe exhaust, a by-product of the combustion process. When you see water dripping out of your exhaust on a cold morning it’s because the water vapor is condensing on the still-cold exhaust pipes and mufflers. If you do not get the engine hot enough, and for long enough, this water will not evaporate away completely, causing corrosion.

Also, when you start a cold engine there’s blow-by of combustion gases and water vapor past the rings that ends up in the sump. This contaminates the lubrication oil, often giving the oil a brown foamy appearance. Over time, the engine heat drives off this water from the oil, but again, only if you ride long enough and the engine gets up to a high enough temperature. Of course, this is hard to do in winter without covering the radiator to block-off the air flow.

Since there’s really no benefit in operating the bike during the off-season (i.e. seals, wheel bearings and tires don’t need it) you often encounter advice to just let it sit till spring. But I say that if you get a nice warm winter’s day take it out and ride it. But ride it long enough to purge the moisture in the crankcase and exhaust. Block-off a part of the radiator air flow to get it up to summer-like coolant temperatures. Reconsider if the roads still have any salt residue on them. It gets into everything, corrosion - Big Time.

You've probably heard that certain parts like seals benefit from not drying out, meaning that you should periodically crank or start the engine so they will remain soaked in oil. This was once a problem for natural rubber parts, but no longer an issue with synthetic materials. Other parts like wheel bearings, tires and suspension seals really won't benefit from being operated during winter storage.
 

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If you are going to let it sit all winter, and not periodically, change your oil. Used oil is very acidic, and when left to sit over a long period of time; the winter, can cause damage.

A tender can also be used to keep the battery fresh. If you can, to persevere the tires, put it up on a front and rear stand. It will prevent flat spots from occurring, and keep the tires fresh.

Good Luck!
 

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92gta:

You live in Bakersfield and store your bike 4 months a year? Dude, didn't think that would be a consideration. I live on the Central Coast due west of you and ride 365 weather (rain) permitting. (Well, a coupe of days if its below 35 and I am worried about black ice)

I was going to joke about moving to so cal, but now I can't. :rolleyes:
 

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92gta:

You live in Bakersfield and store your bike 4 months a year? Dude, didn't think that would be a consideration. I live on the Central Coast due west of you and ride 365 weather (rain) permitting. (Well, a coupe of days if its below 35 and I am worried about black ice)

I was going to joke about moving to so cal, but now I can't. :rolleyes:
I'd say from about Dec. 5th thru say March 1st it's too cold for riding for my taste yes. There are plenty of nights where it's below freezing and honestly if it's any colder than 48 degrees during the day, I won't ride. We have had winter where it snowed and others where it only dipped to freezing once. It's a total crap shoot honestly.
 
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