Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
1. One of the reasons I like my Harley Softail Custom is because it's a bit of a challenge to ride it *well* on America's speed-controlled roads. Part of that whole "it's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow" thing. Since most of the riding you do while touring falls into the "not-very-damn-technical" category, what keeps you from getting bored on your Ducati ST?

2. I also have an 06 800 SS that hurts. My legs hurt and my neck hurts and I think even my jaw hurts. So I've taken up garage yoga. I'm stretching my back and my neck all the time. Why? Because I LOVE the damn bike. I love the way that little engine revs, the way the bike handles, the sound, everything. And I live at 6500 feet, which steals a lot of its power. But I worry that my elastic antics will only carry me so far. Soooooo, is the ST any more comfortable? Do you have any problems getting used to it before going on a long trip?

3. How long do your tires last? I've always heard that you get 3,000 miles out of a pair of sportbike tires. That would suck on a 4,000 mile trip.

4. If I sell my 800 SS and get an ST3, what differences am I going to notice?

5. Are there any years of manufacture that I should avoid for the ST?

6. Looks aside, why would you get an ST instead of a Multistrada?

7. Is it true that to be accepted as a Ducatista you gotta wear a red eurokini under your leathers because I'm not gonna do that.

I'm broke so I can't buy an ST without first selling my 800, but I don't know if I want to sell it because I don't know whether I really want an ST, and I won't sell my Harley because I'm so damned attached to the thing and every time I've sold my Harley before I've wound up regretting it, so even though I'm really, really *really* digging the whole Ducati experience (red eurokinis aside), I simply can't imagine ever leaving Da Wife, no matter how hot La Mistress is.

If you're bored too, let me know what you think. Thanks.

ape
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
1. One of the reasons I like my Harley Softail Custom is because it's a bit of a challenge to ride it *well* on America's speed-controlled roads. Part of that whole "it's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow" thing. Since most of the riding you do while touring falls into the "not-very-damn-technical" category, what keeps you from getting bored on your Ducati ST?

Watching for cops, hot babe in the #2 spot, pulling alongside German hotwheels and staying there.

2. I also have an 06 800 SS that hurts. My legs hurt and my neck hurts and I think even my jaw hurts. So I've taken up garage yoga. I'm stretching my back and my neck all the time. Why? Because I LOVE the damn bike. I love the way that little engine revs, the way the bike handles, the sound, everything. And I live at 6500 feet, which steals a lot of its power. But I worry that my elastic antics will only carry me so far. Soooooo, is the ST any more comfortable? Do you have any problems getting used to it before going on a long trip?

Nope - stop every 1-2 hours, stretch, walk around. Crunches every morning, lose some weight. Embrace the pain, Grasshopper.

3. How long do your tires last? I've always heard that you get 3,000 miles out of a pair of sportbike tires. That would suck on a 4,000 mile trip.

I have about 7,000 miles on my Pirellis, and there's still tread left. I'm not a knee-dragger and don't try to squeeze a lot of performance from my bike - just like to ride a cool bike.

4. If I sell my 800 SS and get an ST3, what differences am I going to notice?

Never rode an 800SS, but the ST3 is a pretty big bike, doesn't seem to like tight maneuvers.

5. Are there any years of manufacture that I should avoid for the ST?

I think the ST is probably always good; if I had it to do over, I'd say get the "S" model - better suspension AND it's adjustable (the non-S is not so much).

6. Looks aside, why would you get an ST instead of a Multistrada?

Depends on your inseam and how much local riding - the MS is probably better as a town/local bike. The ST is designed for two-up, but if you're keeping your HD, maybe the MS would complete your line-up better.

7. Is it true that to be accepted as a Ducatista you gotta wear a red eurokini under your leathers because I'm not gonna do that.

That's silly - you can wear ANY color eurokini you like.

I'm broke so I can't buy an ST without first selling my 800, but I don't know if I want to sell it because I don't know whether I really want an ST, and I won't sell my Harley because I'm so damned attached to the thing and every time I've sold my Harley before I've wound up regretting it, so even though I'm really, really *really* digging the whole Ducati experience (red eurokinis aside), I simply can't imagine ever leaving Da Wife, no matter how hot La Mistress is.

Decisions, decisions. Pull the trigger or put the gun down and step away. :D

If you're bored too, let me know what you think. Thanks.

ape
Good luck,
George
 

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,599 Posts
I am still recuperating from my accident, so I have time to answer some of your questions.

1) I always find something to look at, even on boring roads. Consider it yoga of the mind. I like music, so there is always a tune rolling in my head without the need for an external source of music stuck in my ear.

2) I have only sat on an SS, never ridden one. The ST ergos are much more relaxed than those of an SS. I have only owned one bike at a time, so there is no "getting used to it" before a road trip.

3) Depending on the brand and how you ride, the typical sport touring rear tire will usually last 4,000-6,000 miles. I once got 7,500 miles from a pair of Avon Azaros, which are no longer manufactured (I wonder why?).

4) I am willing to guess that you can ride an ST a lot farther in more comfort than you can ride an SS and you will have a hard bag full of clean clothes when you stop. The 200+ mile gas tank of an ST is a necessity in those parts of the West where I tour.

5) Check the sticky at the top of sport touring forum for comments about the different ST models. I would avoid the following models & model years (my opinions, others may disagree):
98 ST2: many electrical problems which were corrected in subsequent model years.
06 & 07 ST3/ST3s: many have complained that the closed loop fuel injection system causes the bike to run very rough. Some have corrected this problem with a DP performance kit consisting of new ECU, air filter, and pipes to the tune of around $1,400 to $1,700 US.

6) The riding position of the ST with its slight forward lean is more comfortable for me than the upright riding position of the Muilti.

7) The red Eurokini is optional. If you purchase an ST and are over 50 years old, you are required by the man rules of the ST clubhouse to ride with a dark face shield. This is so the cute young girls who inevitably wave at you will not realize you are old enough to be their father.

And finally: keep the cruiser for leisurely local rides where the performance of a Ducati is not necessary.

PS: I wish I could color code my answers like George, only in red.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
06-07 ST3's

As always, Bill brings much wisdom (but not much technology) to the forum. :D

If you replace the stock pipes on the 06-07 ST, the stock ECU can't figure out how to re-calc the fuel requirements.

Naturally, there's a "Ducati Performance" option - $1,500 - which, IMHO, should have been standard equipment from the factory.


Having spent the $1,500 to smooth out my 06 ST3, a new O2 sensor gizmo is now available - for about $80 (of course).
:confused:

Otherwise, the ST3 is a nice bike and a happy medium between the ferocious ST4 and the slightly tepid (by Ducati standards) ST2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I sold my 800SS about a year, maybe two before I got my ST4s (first gen). Here are some random thoughts on the differences...

Accessories - want to put hard bags on an SS? Good luck. Top case? Good luck. Bar risers? Not impossible, but more difficult on the SS. I don't know if any of these are criteria, and obviously they fall into "right bike for the job", but all of these are far easier (or included) on the ST.

Handling - obviously, again, different bikes - the SS is wonderfully light, almost telepathic in how it corners. The ST is no slouch, obviously, but it is bigger, heavier, and it is something you will notice. Should it affect your cornering speeds in street-legal riding? No, not at all. Just a difference in feel.

Comfort - here's the biggie for me. I could not ride the SS for more than about an hour without serious pain setting in. The ST is far easier for me to remain comfortable on.

Range - I don't think I ever saw more than about 110 miles on a tank from the SS. I can easily do 50 mpg on the ST in touring/conservative riding, so that should put me at about 200 miles a tank. Essential out here in the west.

If you like any kind of longer-distance riding, the ST is definitely the right tool for the job. If you just want a fun bike to blast around for an hour or two on a Sunday morning, the SS is the better bike.

As for boredom - hell, you're on a motorcycle, in beautiful country, and not working - how is boredom an issue? :)
 

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,599 Posts
Since most of the riding you do while touring falls into the "not-very-damn-technical" category, what keeps you from getting bored on your Ducati ST?
Re-visiting question #1, I would have to say that a lot my riding while touring falls into the technical category. See my reports and photos in the Rides forum.

The beauty of a hard bag equipped true sport tourer like the ST series is that for several days in succession I can ride several hundred miles of technical roads located several states from home in relative comfort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
Everyone's answers above are spot on. Well done. Now...I am only branching off a little bit here but let's talk tires. I absolutely loath the discussion of mileage and tires. It's like an oil thread. I've gotten as little as 300 miles from a set (track days) and somewhere north of 3000 miles a set. It depends on far too many variables in my opinion. This topic should be banned. Heck, make 'em squared off on a coast to coast interstate trip...and back would probably be possible. BUT THAT' NO FUN and requires someone to actually log conditions and speeds. I HATE TIRE MILEAGE QUESTIONS! THESE ARE ALL SPORT BIKES, dang it!! If mileage was important, get a Harley! ...like you already have. :rolleyes: :eek: Good choice of bikes by the way. Nice variety. :)

For the record, my above response was for both entertainment and me venting my opinion in a humorous way. :) What kind of oil do you think lasts longest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,732 Posts
1. One of the reasons I like my Harley Softail Custom is because it's a bit of a challenge to ride it *well* on America's speed-controlled roads. Part of that whole "it's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow" thing. Since most of the riding you do while touring falls into the "not-very-damn-technical" category, what keeps you from getting bored on your Ducati ST?
Pretty wild assumption there, I don't know where you got it. I like mine because it's a sport tourer. Sport touring assumes a more technical aspect than touring but not street racing. I need bags because I carry stuff and I don't want to carry it on my back.

If I'm on the bike I'm going somewhere, that means at least 300 miles, including twisties. I need some measure of comfort and range and the ST supplies it.

I don't know what tire mileage has to do with anything. If you want to make them last longer you can get harder ones and take it easy on any bike.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,636 Posts
I went from a '01 900SS to the '03 ST4s. I owned the SS for 5 years and I am just about at the 5 year mark on the ST right now. The decision was due to my then 100 mile a day commute. The SS was kicking my butt. My SS had a Sergeant seat and Cycle Cat risers that provided a bunch more comfort over stock. I don’t think I could have ridden every day on the SS if it was stock. The SS also had a dyno tuned Power Commander, Arrow pipes, open air box, and I went up 3 teeth on the rear sprocket. The forks were raised 10MM in the triples and the suspension was set reasonably well. Very nice bike with good power, excellent throttle response and light handling. I never had a problem hanging with faster bikes in spirited rides and often I led the group.

On my hour ride home from the dealer with the ST4s, I was faster smoother and more comfortable than I had ever been on the SS. I took the same set of twisties home that I often did on the SS, and was surprised at my speed on the ST. Yes, the bike is heaver, but it doesn’t seem to show when you’re on it.

Now the ST has Cycle Cat risers, not for the rise, but for the pull back and bar angle I always felt the stock bars were too flat and too far forward. The rise I have set is about the same as stock. A Sergeant seat, bags and brackets are off, shorter ZG screen, DP pipes with no other engine or fueling mods (although I do think the fuel trim was adjusted by the dealer for the pipes), and a 43 tooth rear sprocket (up 5 from stock). Ride height is adjusted to quicken the steering and the suspension is set up pretty well. The S model has good suspension! Smoothes out the bumps, but very well controlled.

The ST has become a comfortable sport bike to me, rather than a sport touring machine. Although, an hour in the garage to put the bags back on and maybe adjust the bar risers up a little, and I am right back in long-haul mode. The SS range is nice, but there is nothing it can do that the ST can’t do and you’ll do it with more power and comfort on the ST.

I wear boxers. No idea what a Eurokini is!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Apehair, you may want to consider your hight and weight when buying a ST proper setup of suspension is important exp if you are in the 200 + # range.
S model is adj to a point but will also need to be resprung and revalved if you are a big guy.
Some find the stock seat very nice however for everyday riding and touring I prefer a Sargent for technical riding I prefer a Corbin as it sits a bit lower but is much harder.
As said before the DP ecu and pipes or reflash is a must do really woke mine up and dont forget to at least drop one tooth on the countershaft sprocket from stock if you ride in town at all,becomes much more manageable.
Currently searching for a headlight upgrade :think:
No Eurokini's dont come in + sizes :eek:
A bit off point from your questions but just my .02
 

·
Chilehead
Joined
·
6,982 Posts
Most of the riding I do while touring falls into the pretty damn technical to very damn technical category.

I prefer my ST2 to my SS when I have to carry a lot of stuff, otherwise I prefer the SS.

Both get around 3k miles on a set of tires.

The SS drinks a lot less.

The ST2 is better on crappy road surfaces, the SS better on roads with lots of switchbacks.

The ST2 is better for grocery shopping.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thank You!

I just came inside from doing that yoga pose called The Salty Codpiece. You guys probably know it. Lo and behold, I have several responses. Thank you very, very much. I take back everything I ever said about Ducati riders.

First things first. On page 276 of "The Idiot's Guide to Being a Badass," a eurokini is defined as "a ridiculous tiny shiny bathing rag worn by middle-aged men with no ass, no legs, and a hairless bloated midsection as a signal to hot young eurobabes that they can go out in public dressed like that because they are wicked rich."

When you purchase a Harley in America, you have to sign an oath in front of two witnesses that you will never wear one. Except in Miami.

Second, I made that assumption that most touring in America would not challenge a Ducati based on the dumb speed limits, crowds, normal safety precautions, and other factors that keep your speed down in most riding situations. I figured you could push a Harley to its limits in real-world riding more easily than a Ducati. But if I'm wrong, that's excellent.

If anyone else has an opinion, please shoot it at me. I'm eating this stuff up. I really appreciate the information.

Hey st2lemans, eres chileno?

ape
 

·
Mr Leakered
Joined
·
8,819 Posts
Ha!

Last year my wife saw a rather large dude riding a bright yellow Goldwing in nothing but a speedo/eurokini and a helmet.

I am thoroughly glad I didn't have to witness it.

Have a good one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Hi, Ape,

I love my 04 MY ST4s ABS. The previous owner took wonderful care of it and I've tried to do the same. As its no longer in production, I want my ST to last forever...

While I may not ride as far, or as fast as some of the members on this board, I've put in some long days, on very twisty roads in comfort. While the ST does fine on the slab, it really comes to life in the twisties.

Go on, buy one, you won't regret it.

Best,
1527
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,806 Posts

·
Chilehead
Joined
·
6,982 Posts
The "CH" in your profile throws everyone. You are the only person in the world who knows that it does not stand for "Chile", "China", or "Chad."
Strange, I would have thought that everyone knew that is stands for 'Confoederatio Helvetica'.

What next, people thinking that 'E' stands for 'England' or 'Ecuador'?

Tom
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top