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Discussion Starter #1
Why didn't Supersports come with them and would there be a real advantage or disadvantage to having one?
 

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Why didn't Supersports come with them and would there be a real advantage or disadvantage to having one?
With the stock frame geometry, Supersports, as a good friend of mine once said, are as stable as a John Deere tractor. You can fall off, and the bike will manage to keep going into the next county.

Steering dampers do just what the name implies: they dampen the movement of the steering. This is handy if your front end wants to begin to waggle back and forth because you sharpened the geometry--or because you don't have a light touch on the bars :). If the front end of a Supersport is wagging, it probably indicates a problem: unbalanced wheel, loose/sticking bearings, too much rider input, misaligned wheels, bent frame, etc. The disadvantage is spending money when you don't need to.

I have had the front end of a 750SS and an 800SS begin to oscillate a bit while on the track, always in a fast, WOT kink of some sort. I had about 12mm of ride height added to the stock shock set up. My bikes really didn't like handlebar input at all when they had a full head of steam, but they did turn better into the corners.
 

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as stated, they are very stable under smooth hands. I rarely get a wobble out of mine on the road or track. if it does, it's pretty mellow. but I guess if you have a very modified one with 90+hp and wring her hard, it might fight back a bit....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
as a good friend of mine once said, are as stable as a John Deere tractor. You can fall off, and the bike will manage to keep going into the next county.
Hmmm, thats good... But kinda scary at the same time. Hopefully if I ever bail for some reason theres nothing scary expensive within a straight mile of me :D

I found one for $100 and heard theyre rare, so i considered getting it. But i've never had front wobble so I guess it would be pointless, which would explain why i've never needed to look into something to aid front end wobble.
 

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Hmmm, thats good... But kinda scary at the same time. Hopefully if I ever bail for some reason theres nothing scary expensive within a straight mile of me :D

I found one for $100 and heard theyre rare, so i considered getting it. But i've never had front wobble so I guess it would be pointless, which would explain why i've never needed to look into something to aid front end wobble.
About the scary part...My first weekend racing a Duc 800SS I'd prepped for the track. A rider highsides in front of me on the @#@$#% warm up lap. I hit his bike. I am launched from the Duc and land hard, breaking my collar bone. The bike stays on two wheels and ghost rides itself into the Armco barrier, destroying the frame. Yes, the gyroscopic force is strong in these bikes :D.

Now, about that $100 steering damper...Race organizations require them, so you should be able to sell it to a racer. Most racers use little or no damping adjustment, but if the race org says ya gotta have one, then ya gotta have one!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So perhaps its a worthwhile buy atleast. COOL!

Make a few bucks on it for other parts or use it on mine.. Either way.

And as i read your statement about the design not needing a damper, I couldn't help but think... beautiful, efficient design on Ducati's part. I feel proud just thinking about owning this bike. As I frequently do...

Riding friend of mine replaced both his sprockets a few weeks ago and he told me pulling the front sprocket was the most difficult thing he has done to his bike since he owned it. I just pulled both of mine cause I ordered new ones plus a chain. It took me 10 minutes to pull the rear wheel and front sprocket on mine.

Im thrilled that since the day I bought this bike only thing most people have said about it was "Cool bike, but have fun paying for and replacing parts on that Italian thing" when any time I have done something to my SS, it's taken 2 or 3 times the time/frustration for other people to do on their bikes. :)
 

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99 900ss

I've had some at the track and just moved my wgt forward, kinda like coming out of a sand pit on a turn with a dirt bike you just lean forward and twist the wrist.

I've been told by people that I should have one in "I" group they just cost so dam much for what you get that I should know to correct?
 

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There is absolutely no need for a stearing damper on this bike. I've got highly modified track only 2005 1000SS (100+ BHP and custom triple clamps providing for a much steeper than stock stearing angle) and I took the damper off the bike 3 years ago and never have felt the need to put it back on. I've never had any uncontrolled or problematic headshake. I keep the damper in my spares box - just in case - but I have never even had second thoughts about it.

As long as your suspension and geometry is reasonably well set up and you are an experienced rider, I can not imagine the circumstances where a damper woudl make a big difference on the 1000SS chassis.

George
 

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Why didn't Supersports come with them and would there be a real advantage or disadvantage to having one?
Yes, there is an advantage and no disadvantages (except for the bill) if you get a good quality, adjustable one. You need to increase damping for highway use and reduce (to zero) for city.

With the stock frame geometry, Supersports, as a good friend of mine once said, are as stable as a John Deere tractor. You can fall off, and the bike will manage to keep going into the next county.

Steering dampers do just what the name implies: they dampen the movement of the steering. This is handy if your front end wants to begin to waggle back and forth because you sharpened the geometry--or because you don't have a light touch on the bars :). If the front end of a Supersport is wagging, it probably indicates a problem: unbalanced wheel, loose/sticking bearings, too much rider input, misaligned wheels, bent frame, etc. The disadvantage is spending money when you don't need to.

I have had the front end of a 750SS and an 800SS begin to oscillate a bit while on the track, always in a fast, WOT kink of some sort. I had about 12mm of ride height added to the stock shock set up. My bikes really didn't like handlebar input at all when they had a full head of steam, but they did turn better into the corners.
Agreed 100% for the track part, you do not need one for track or where the tarmac is smooth without bumps and pit holes. But is it? :confused:
Most of us are driving on public roads, and public roads are a different story.
Let me ask you this, did anyone of you that you don't recommend the use of a steering stabilizer actually put one on YOUR bike and then removed it because you did not like it?
I was under the same impression until the hit of 2-3 sequential road bumps at the exit of a turn on third gear and wide open throttle (where the front end lightens), talking about scary? changed my underwear twice!!!
I installed an adjustable Ohlins (16 position, set to 10 clicks out from fully hard), test drive it on the SAME turn, third gear, wide open throttle, straight as an arrow, saved me from two pairs of underwear change, I'm not willing to take it off. I think it's a great upgrade for those unexpected circumstances.
Just my 2 cents.
 

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I have the hyperpro installed on my SS1000. They are fairly easy to find online. Haven't really needed it, and use little/no damping on it.
 

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Most of us are driving on public roads, and public roads are a different story.
I've hit some pretty crazy bumps/holes/etc. riding on the street... and the SS hasn't even blinked. Caught one rut/pothole hard enough to jerk the handlebars out of my hands but it didn't headshake at all (didn't crash either, it regained stability almost immediately). For street, I just don't see the need for a damper.
 

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Bike tracks fine but big bumps make a damper cool

Any Way I already have a ohlins r&t damper....
but on my CR I need to mount it low and the frame clamp would be on a large frame tube but my damper bracket is for the small frame tube... SO if I want to try it and find out if I like it or not... I need to get a frame clamp that will fit the larger tube...
anyone know who to call? of do I machine one from scratch???:abduct:
 

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I have changed the geometry of my 1kSS substantially by increasing the ride height. When its set up and running I should have a better idea if a damper is needed, it didn’t need it before. Like everyone says the stock geometry makes for a rock solid machine…
 

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Bikes that have been designed with a longer trail dimension will return to a straight-ahead wheel position sooner because the restoring force increases as the trail increases.

Steering dampers will only resist changes in steering direction and don't provide this restoring force to re-center the wheel like trail does. Consequently, adding damping will spoil your quick steering as well as cause weave instability problems if cranked-up too high.

So there is a downside to using a steering damper on a bike that has been demonstrated doesn't need it for preventing tankslappers.
 

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I've only had my 03 SS 1000 for a few weeks, & done around 600klms on it. So I'm still fine tuning the suspension settings. But mine shakes it's head when accelerating over big bumps on my favourite range road. It's nothing too serious, & the bike recovers it's composure quickly. But it's annoying & slows my chase of my mate's 999S. So I've ordered an Ohlins damper for it. I'll give my opinion of it's pros & cons when it gets here.
 

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I have found no need for a damper with forks -10mm Ride height at +30mm over stock. It now turns in how I want and is still stable, really stable. Tracked it for the first time two weeks ago and it was really good. Changing the rubber to Corsa SC2's but no other changes as yet other than get fitter and stop being so scared..
 

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Any Way I already have a ohlins r&t damper....
but on my CR I need to mount it low and the frame clamp would be on a large frame tube but my damper bracket is for the small frame tube... SO if I want to try it and find out if I like it or not... I need to get a frame clamp that will fit the larger tube...
anyone know who to call? of do I machine one from scratch???:abduct:
I'll be in the garage tomorrow, I'll take a few pics of how my damper is mounted on my track bike with CR fairings. I think I needed to buy a longer bolt and a 30mm metal spacer.

As far as needing one. I don't ride hard on the street. I rode at the track for 2yrs without serious need of one. It wasn't until I started picking up the pace, and raised my rear end did I experience head shake. Bumps exiting a turn when you are hard on the gas can get some shaking.
 
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