Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Found a nail in the rear and need new rubber. My manaul said this should be done at the dealer, sensors, phonic wheels etc. Is this a do it yourself project or not. I am not within 50 miles of any dealer/shop and 150 from a Duc shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Do it yourself

We're not talking brain surgery here. Do you have tools? You will need a 30mm socket/wrench for the axle nut & 12mm for the chain adjusters. I also unbolt the brake caliper from the caliper bracket. If you don't have the means to take the tire on & off the wheel at least you can save some $ by taking the wheel/tire off the bike yourself. I have some tire irons, plastic rim protectors, a cheap bead breaker & a static balancer set-up I use. It doesn't take long to get tired of paying people to F&%K up your wheels. I'm hoping to upgrade to a Nomar tire changer soon. Good luck.
Gregg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
If you have the right size wrench or socket think it's 46mm or 1 13/16" it's pretty easy on the stand.
Remove nut, remove axle, loosen chain tension bolts push wheel forward, slip off chain remove wheel. Might have to move rear brake if it doesn't allow wheel to slip out.
FYI: Did this on an ST4 but assume it's similar, I'm handy but not a mechanic. Also let the a dealer install the tire.
Lining up the wheel to install axle was the hardest issue for me.
Also found this: http://excessivelocity.blogspot.com/2006/08/removing-wheels-st3-954rr.html
 

·
Member
Joined
·
7,733 Posts
Found a nail in the rear and need new rubber. My manaul said this should be done at the dealer, sensors, phonic wheels etc. Is this a do it yourself project or not. I am not within 50 miles of any dealer/shop and 150 from a Duc shop.
Can you plug it, ie is it in the centre of the tire?

Of course your manual says it should be done at the dealer, they want your money. If you've done this on other bikes, ie removed and replaced the rear wheel, you'll be able to do it on your Duke. If not, it's pretty straight forward though a third hand might come in handy if you haven't done something like this before. Be careful with the abs sensor and use the correct torque on the axle nuts and chain adjuster bolts, keep grease away from the axle adjuster plates and the inside of the swing arm but put some on the axle nut threads, and make sure the spacer on the left side goes in cone side first, and align the wheel and adjust the tension on the chain, that's all. :) Look at it this way, if you take it to a dealer, the apprentice is probably gonna do the job, so are you any better off? ;)

Start by putting the bike up with the center stand on 1-2" thick board that doen't extend to under the tire, so you won't have the remove the hugger to get the wheel out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
If you have the right size wrench or socket think it's 46mm or 1 13/16"

30mm is the same as 1-3/16'' -which is what the size of the rear axle nut is, not 46mm. The rear wheel nut size on my 916 is something like 46mm. Much larger than the ST.
Gregg
 

·
Life is too short to worry !
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
I love the dealer terminology , What is a phonic wheel , what do they claim is son difficult ?
Some tyre shops will do the job if they work on bikes , some even take the wheel off for you , you dont "need" a Ducati dealer to do the work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Does this ST3s have ABS? If so, you all might be talking about the ABS sensor ring. Is it possible these need to be removed before the wheels go onto a tire change machine so they don't get damaged?
Bill W.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I have seen a dealer re installing a rear on an ST2 but in doing so some how the chain and sproket were still in place during the whole process and there was no need for chain adjustment once completed, does anyone know of howe this is done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
Too much weed, man...that musta been a 916, 996 or 748.

Most important, also, after she's all back together and tight, is to make sure the adjuster bolts are TIGHT. If these are not snugged, they will rattle loose, and ugly (and expensive) things happen...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,883 Posts
Maybe it was an ST2 converted to a single-sided swingarm...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
St2

NO and NO, it definitely was an ST2 with a standard swing arm sorry gents, looks like I will have to go back to the shop and confirm this with Larry who was doing the job at this time,
I may be mistaken with this procedure but gee you are quick with the shit whit are't you, "too much drugs" good one.
 

·
Chilehead
Joined
·
6,982 Posts
I never need to readjust the chain on my ST2 when II replace the wheel.

Just remove the axel, move the wheel forward, remove chain from sprocket (to the left), remove wheel.

Simple.

Tom
 

·
Member
Joined
·
7,733 Posts
I have seen a dealer re installing a rear on an ST2 but in doing so some how the chain and sproket were still in place during the whole process and there was no need for chain adjustment once completed, does anyone know of howe this is done?
Can't be done. The wheel has to be be removed from the swing arm in the first place to be reinstalled, and to do that the chain comes off as does the caliper. Even if for example the wheel was allowed to swing straight down, say on a bike service lift with the rear floor section removed once the bike is up, you still have to disengage the chain from the sprocket to service the wheel, and even if for some reason you didn't, you still have to readjust the chain tension/alignment when you put it all back together.

Seriously, if you discover a way of removing and reinstalling the rear wheel without having to adjust the chain on reinstall, I'd certanly love to get the instructions as I find it to be a PITA doing it the conventional, "gnashing of teeth" way. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
partially remove the axle out?

Is it possible to partially remove the axle so as to remove the rim but keeping the rear sprocket and it's carrier(splitting at the cush drive) thus removing the caliper and it's mount together allowing the wheel to shift to the right, parting at the cush drive and out, remembering that the axle is still in far enough to hold rear sprocket and its carrier in place? does this sound like too much drugs?,
I'm not sure but I am nearing tyre change myself and will try this.:cool:
 

·
Member
Joined
·
7,733 Posts
...does this sound like too much drugs?,
I'm not sure but I am nearing tyre change myself and will try this.:cool:
Sound to me like it's more a matter of quality than quanity: you got some good shyte. ;)

Good luck with all that. :)
 

·
Life is too short to worry !
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Is it possible to partially remove the axle so as to remove the rim but keeping the rear sprocket and it's carrier(splitting at the cush drive) thus removing the caliper and it's mount together allowing the wheel to shift to the right, parting at the cush drive and out, remembering that the axle is still in far enough to hold rear sprocket and its carrier in place? does this sound like too much drugs?,
I'm not sure but I am nearing tyre change myself and will try this.:cool:
:think: No :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Is it possible to partially remove the axle so as to remove the rim but keeping the rear sprocket and it's carrier(splitting at the cush drive) thus removing the caliper and it's mount together allowing the wheel to shift to the right, parting at the cush drive and out, remembering that the axle is still in far enough to hold rear sprocket and its carrier in place? does this sound like too much drugs?,
I'm not sure but I am nearing tyre change myself and will try this.:cool:
+1 on No. The sprocket and cush drive assembly can only be removed after the wheel is out from between the arms. I think you're trying too hard to save a few minutes of time. It's not that difficult to remove and replace the rear. Basic steps are:
1. Remove the caliper from the bracket and hang it up out of the way.
2. Remove the axle.
3. Roll the wheel forward and remove the chain from the sprocket.
4. Remove the sprocket and cush drive assembly after rolling the wheel out.
5. Change rear tire.
6. Do steps 1-4 in reverse. Note 1: You need to place the caliper bracket in its slot before rolling the wheel back in. Note 2: Be sure the spacer on the left side is put back in with the flat side against the swingarm.
7. Take up slack on axle nut. Makes adjusting chain tension easier.
8. Check chain tension and adjust as necessary.
9. Torque axle nut.
10. Torque chain adjuster nuts. Note: These are easy to over-torque and strip out.

Bill W.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
phonic wheel
is that ABS sensor ring - it is not a big deal and I wouldn't remove it. When you put the wheel back on just remember to take a look at the clearance of the sensor and the ring. Service manual says... gap should be between 0.6 and 2.2 mm when everything is snugged up. if you need to adjust add or remove shims underneath the sensor; but it is a big range - shouldn't need to do anything.

One tip - prior to removing the wheel. Undo the clip that holds the brakeline and sensor wire to the swingarm and slide the hard line out. When you take the wheel off the caliper holder will flop down so catch it as you slide the wheel off and use a zip tie to hang it somewhere nearby. If you leave the brake line clamped in the caliper kind of hanges from it which probably is sub-optimal for the life of the line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
If you don't loosen the adjusters, why would you need to readjust the tension/alignment?

Tom
You will probably need to loosen the adjusters to get enough slack in the chain to take it off. Even if you didn't. Resetting the tension and alignment of the chain and sprockets is probably just a good thing to be doing anytime to take the wheel off and on. It is easy enough (maybe 10 mins?) certainly no harm in doing it.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top