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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I sold my monster because I wanted a bike that was more comfortable on long rides and capable of some two-up riding and not sacrifice handling. I looked at the ST and the Multistrada, however, I just couldn't get past the ugly duckling looks of the multi. So I bought an ST2 but have struggled with suspension issues and limitations. I know I can upgrade the components but I'm wondering if I made the wrong choice.
 

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If your goal is long rides and 2-up riding, you've made the right choice. The Multi will tour and ride 2-up too, but the ST (ST2, ST3, ST4 & ST4s) is definitely more stable and more comfortable for touring. :D

A lot depends on your riding style and riding environment, though. I've owned an ST4s for 7 years and have put over 75,000 miles on it touring. I love it to death, but I also had a Multi 1100s for 10 months on which I toured 15,000 miles and to be honest, I loved it more! There are a heck of a lot of twisty mountain roads around here and the Multi is an absolute blast in the tight twisties. The Multi is heck of a lot of fun!

However, I have to admit, I'm a big guy (6'3" tall and around 280lbs!) and the Multi is not as comfortable as the ST on longer trips (e.g. 300+ mile day rides). It just wears you out faster, especially if you have to slab any distance on a freeway.
 

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I'd do the suspension upgrades - it really does make a huge difference, partly because it will be sprung for your weight, load, and riding behavior, partly because it's new, and partly because Ohlins makes good shit. Don't forgot the forks while you're at it.
 

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I don't know what "limitations" you found to your ST, so can't respond to that. however, once you are riding ANY bike, you cannot see what it looks like. if you didn't take a test ride on both, maybe you did make a mistake. however, having your suspension dialed in is important on any bike. especially when you think about the different loads on a sport touring bike where the weight varies from solo to two up with lots of gear.
I love my multi, just did an 8 day, 3000+mile, six state ride on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My frustration has been getting the suspension dialed in and I think I'm at the limits of the stock set-up. There's around 15k miles on the bike which is not a lot but I think the forks and shock need to be redone. My thought is that rather than spend another $12-1400 on new suspension parts, maybe I need to look at the multi. I'm not doing any cross-country type rides but want something comfortable for 4-5 hour trips and is a blast to ride through the twisties. I rode a friend's Hypermotard and it was very different. I'm not sure if this would be a good bike for me and I'm not sure if the multi is the same riding position. I suppose a test ride is in order.

Thanks for the replies,
Paul
 

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I've run both an ST2 and a MTS1000 for a while now. In your position I'd go over the ST2 before getting rid of it. In my experience you won't get the MTS to outhandle a well set up ST. If I were you I'd replace the fork oil, regrease head bearings, confirm that the tyres are recent and not badly mis-shapen, clean adn grease swingarm pivit and linkage. You should then have a bike that will outhandle an MTS.

Even when in tip top condition my MTS feels a bit vague at the front when really going for it, whereas the ST will just lean over and enjoy it. Don't get me wrong, the MTS is a fine handling bike but the ST is just plain better.

As far as touring is concerned I tend to pick the bike by the type of roads. Fast sweeping bends suit the ST - whereas its not so comfortable on the slower stuff (leant too far forwards to potter and look at the view). If I'm in Wales cruising about looking at the scenery then the MTS is the one.

The ST also has softer suspenion & a better seat.

In a straight line the MTS is much quicker - although both are rated at 85bhp, the MTS feels like its got 15bhp over the ST2. My ST2 didn't feel slow in the winter but when the summer came round I wanted a bit more, having said that if you really want to get up and go then get a desmoquattro.

When you talk of suspension upgrades don't be too seduced by the ohlins and gold forks on the ST4. The forks are identical to yours on the ST2 but with a bit of TiN plating. Nothing too fancy there. The internals are identical. The Ohlins is ok but is worth more in tall stories and bling than its worth on the road. Driving the same roads on my ST2 and ST4s the ST2 really isn't deficient in the handling dept.

Of all the bikes I've ever owned it was the one that surprised me the most because my expectations were pretty modest and it delivered such a lot.

Hope this helps, Mark.
 

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Spent $1200 in parts, labor, and set-up as a birthday present to myself last year to put the Öhlins on my ST2 and it just rails. Mid corner bumps no longer disrupt the steering and it feels great at speed. I was willing to invest the money because I know I'll be keeping this bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guys, thanks for the input. I really like the ST but didn't know if it would be capable of delivering the handling. The bike came with Marchesini forged wheels but it had Pirelli Dragon Super Corsa Pro tires. These are more race tires than street. The rear is a 190 but should be a 180 at most. Based on what you are telling me, I think some new shoes, re-work the forks, and have the rear shock re-sprung and re-valved and I could be a pretty happy guy.

Cheers,
Paul
 
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