Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As my warranty is now up and I've just had an unpleasant experience with a local bike shop I am going to do my own servicing from here on in.

I have manuals etc but wouldn't it be great to have some old hands with experience to give a few tips to the n00bs?
Be a great reference resource for us all don't you think?

Anyhow my next service is 60k kilometers/ 37k miles so I'm assuming shims, belts, plugs as well as check bearings. I'm also going to replace the steering head bearings.

First up, what special tools do I need apart from a set of shims?

TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Cheers Bly! Great idea for a thread.

And thats unfortunately all I have to contribute...lol:p. Having taken part in watching Dietrich pretty much do my 12 or 15k service first hand; I will chime in that I think it is something that can be managed with the right tools. I've thrown a lot of money away on pricey shop service simply because I don't have the tools, time, or hands on knowhow. Sounds like a problem that can be solved. Would like to wrench as well as I ride (hopefully just not as much...:rolleyes:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
How about repairs? How do you go about some of the basic repairs to damage such as the seen here http://www.jcmatsuura.com/PS_Spill/ ? Replacement is easy, but if you can't afford to replace, say, the frame (steering stop) or the exhaust, what would you do?
Fix it if you can… the steering stop as seen on the picture can easily be repaired as long as you have no cracks in the frame and tubing is not bent.

I did so…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
A few battle scars gives the bike character.. I've gone over on mine a couple of times..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yeah stuff like that is all good for reference. But a few tips from average owners who are up on maintenance will be valuable as well.


Here they are embedded.


valve adjustment


change belts

oil change
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
After decades of home maintenance of Moto Guzzi (relatively simple), I've also decided that DIY is the way to go with my Dukes. The Desmo Times site lists typical tools needed for valve adjustment, though many of them are not needed for the DS motor. I'd recommend the engine turning tool - you can put 'er in gear and turn over the motor with the rear wheel, but finding TDC with the proper tool is SOO easy:cool:

Yesterday I started with oil/filter change and gauze filter clean. Found an almost intact closer shim half ring attached to the end of the drain plug magnet - so one thing led to another, tank removal, checked all valve clearances, and checked that all four valves had 2 half rings! Anyway, none of it was too daunting, the only valve that is difficult to access is the intake valve for the vertical cylinder, the others are a breeze. None of mine needed adjustment. When the time comes I'll replace belts at the same time, will make the process much simpler, and enable the pistons to stay at TDC during the shim removal process.

The best part was hitting the starter button when all was completed, and hearing the bike fire up instantly. :D

Can't recommend California Cycle Works highly enough - great service, great prices, and economical postage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Look I kept my old bevel 750 going myself back in the 70s, so how much harder can a modern two-valve be?
I'll post any tips myself when and as I do each task.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
900 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,455 Posts
Yesterday I started with oil/filter change and gauze filter clean. Found an almost intact closer shim half ring attached to the end of the drain plug magnet -
Probably this is obvious, but almost for sure that was dropped down one of the oil galleys in the vertical head when someone was adjusting valves. Common newbie mistake. You are supposed to plug those holes with something before removing the half rings to prevent that from happening. It's not a huge chunk of steel, but still not something you want churning around in the crankcase until it finds the magnet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
The bike I was working on has only covered 2,000 km, so no valve adjustments yet. Possibly the part was dropped during factory assembly, which makes me wonder it was not found by the mechanic who did the 1,000 km service. Maybe, as Yellowduck suggested, it just took that long to get to the bottom of the crankcase?

Like Brooksie, my motivation is partly convenience. My nearest dealer is 130 km away, really needs 2 trips if I'm to give them a cold motor to work on. Hmmm, let's see, travel a total of 520 km, with 2 trips by my wife as well in the car, or, learn to do it myself?

Thanks for the link to the GT1000 blog, Brooksie! Priceless ;>}
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The way I figger it, even with buying a few tools and a set of shims I'll still be ahead financially after one major service. Not to mention the peace of mind knowing things have been done to my satisfaction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
The way I figger it, even with buying a few tools and a set of shims I'll still be ahead financially after one major service. Not to mention the peace of mind knowing things have been done to my satisfaction.
Exactly. The expense of one service buys more or less all tools necessary. And you get to keep the new toys. For other toys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
I have bought a 1000s workshop manual on CD and now i can't read it… It is only for Microsoft:(
Pro nerd speaking, maybe I can help; What's the file format / filename extension?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
Pro nerd speaking, maybe I can help; What's the file format / filename extension?
I'll check it out… have to get home first

I thought that the times when mac users were bashed are over…:think:

But the CD was created by Italians:sleep:
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top