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Discussion Starter #1
Seems odd but my mechanic here in Singapore says that the Sport Classic inner tube (thicker than a standard tube I'm told) is unavailable from the SG Ducati dealership or the tire shops here they've tried. Anyone know of a good source I can order it from that will ship overseas? I'll be using it with the Perelli Rossa Corsa.
 

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Seems odd but my mechanic here in Singapore says that the Sport Classic inner tube (thicker than a standard tube I'm told) is unavailable from the SG Ducati dealership or the tire shops here they've tried. Anyone know of a good source I can order it from that will ship overseas? I'll be using it with the Perelli Rossa Corsa.
Dude, your mech is on crystal meth ;) ...any inner tube is fine. Take the bike to a tyre shop, not a Ducati dealer, or just get your mech to order whatever inner tube he would fit to any rims of that size.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is that right, LondonDutch? These guys are pretty reputable as sport-bike mechanics (they're not the dealership) but not many Ducatis in Sing so maybe they've been ill informed. Do the new bike come with a thicker tube or is it a plain one?
 

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In these modern, commercially-driven times, Ducati solus dealers, (who are Ducati trained and indoctrinated) will only want to use Ducati OEM parts for any work that they do. This extends to belts and other items that you can get from other sources. Sometimes they will cite "warranty issues", but usually it's about using parts where Ducati make the profits.

Tyre inner tubes are made by the same people that make tyres (usually) and you can by normal ones, or heavy duty, and like many products, you get what you pay for (so don't buy cheap crap), but any non affiliated tyres shop would just use a quality inner tube from any reputable manufacturer. If Ducati do actually have an official inner tube (which would surprise me) then someone else makes it for them, and it's not in any way special or unique. In fact it's likely to be sourced according to price and not quality.

If you want a qualified opinion (after all, I'm just a blogger and a biker) then please don't take my word for it, and ring a Pirelli dealer and ask what tubes they would recommend and supply for your bike, as it's their product that you are using.

As for lightweight, vs normal vs heavy duty... Well, lightweight ones save weight... but may puncture more easily, normal ones are just normal, and heavy duty ones are favoured by offroad riders, and they do last longer, but they also weigh more - which is may not be what you want on your un-sprung rotating mass. (...in my unqualified opinion)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm not that familiar with spoked tires and it's effects on tire/tube wear. Sounds like I should try to get a thicker one but it's not really necessary, even if purchasing the Perelli Phantoms.
 

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I'm not that familiar with spoked tires and it's effects on tire/tube wear. Sounds like I should try to get a thicker one but it's not really necessary, even if purchasing the Perelli Phantoms.
Yup. Tubed tyres are almost always used on spoked wheels (simply cos spokes stop the wheel being airtight), so there is nothing unique about the SC using them that would require using a heavy duty tube... But an HD tube "might "last longer in terms of wear & tear - however it's no more nail-proof than a normal tube.

The confusing part is that tyres are now mostly made to work tubeless, and this is how they are labelled and described, so owners don't always realise that when those tyres are used on spoked wheels, there is probably a tube inside - which is fine and normal, and as per the tyre manufacturer's expectations on that bike.

Once a tube is fitted the tyre will wear as normal. The only downsides are weight, and the fact that you can't use a plug-kit if you get a puncture. The upside is that you shouldn't need to plug or to replace your tyre after a puncture (unless it's trashed) as a new tube will be a complete fix.
 

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I was looking for a rear tube for my GT and visited the local Cycle Gear, Yamaha dealers, Ducati Dealers and a independent shop. No luck and all 3-5 special order day shipping. Made a last ditch effort to the local Harley dealer and found that they stock a 180/60/17 that will (and has) worked perfectly. Turns out though that nearly every 17 inch tire tube will work, its recommend that you get closer to the 160/180/180 size though
 

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A tube is a tube as long as it it designed for the tire size and the SC's are standard sizes. They can be found "anywhere tubes are sold". I was recently looking for lighter ones and gave up.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but rather that creating a new one, figured this one would do: how often should tubes be changed?
 

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I know this is an old thread, but rather that creating a new one, figured this one would do: how often should tubes be changed?
That's a good question.
My guess is whenever you get 1) a punture and 2) a new tyre fitted.
 
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