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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, I am new to the forum and just wanted some advice. I am considering a few different bikes and the GT1000 is one of the front runners.

I am 95kg and about 6"5, I do not have much experience on a geared bike, but have travelled about 50,000km in the last 2 years on a 500cc scooter. I am looking for a bike to use as everyday transport, and as a weekend ride, and occasional tourer. Wife on the back one a week. So pretty much an allround bike. Should cover about 20,000km per year. My commute is not really in heavy traffic. At the moment my scooter does all this. I am not really interested in having 2 bikes, and I hate driving the car!

I love the style of the SC range, but figured the GT would be the best option for my likely use. Being more relaxed in riding style.

My questions are:
-Is the GT1000 comfortable for someone of my stature over a longer ride (feels good in the showroom)?
-Is the GT1000 comfortable(ish) 2 up?
-What kind of mileage can I expect in the city, and on the highway?
-Is the thruxton/bonneville better suited to this use?
-Is the GT1000 suited to this use?
-Will I be ok to "learn" (have spent only about 15 hours in geared bikes) geared riding on a GT1000
-Am I completely barking up the wrong tree?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Please be kind, and thanks!
Adam
 

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Hi, and welcome to the forum.

The nature of a forum is that you'll get many opinions, and some may be very strong. But then, that's what you're asking for, isn't it- so here's mine...

Though the 2 valve 1000cc Sport Classic motor has a very nice power curve (it doesn't suddenly 'hit the pipe' and throw you off the back), it's still a 1000cc motor with a good deal of torque. Some might argue a v-twin like the Suzuki SV 650 would be a better place to learn a 'geared bike'. I'd have a hard time arguing against that point.

In the order of your questions then, yes- I'd say it would be comfortable for a guy your height. I'm 6' 2", and 195 lbs. (88-89 kg?), so you've got some length on me for sure, but I find it very comfortable. The pegs are low enough that my legs aren't cramped, but even on the GT they're high enough for fairly spirited cornering.

Yes, for two up riding it's a good one also.

Guys with stock pipes and ECU report mid 50's mpg on the highway- don't know in city. With the Termignoni pipes and DP ECU (much richer fueling) I get low to mid 40's easily on the highway, and rarely less than 40 mpg average.

The Thruxton/Bonneville is a nice bike with an upright seating position not unlike the GT1000 (the Thruxton's clip-ons would be more like a Sport 1000). Much less power, heavier, and the brakes are far from the Ducati. On the other hand, it's less money too.

Is it suited to commuting that includes city and highway riding? Absolutely. It's easy to handle in traffic, easy on your wrists, and has plenty of power for any highway speed.

I can't say about learning 'geared riding' on the GT. Could you? Certainly, it's a standard gear pattern, same as everything else on the market. Some find the seat height too much, but at your height (and mine) you'll be able to sit flat footed at a light, and still have a bend in your knees.

To all of that I'd add that my GT has been stone reliable, and is a wonderful bike to ride and own. Every bike out there develops 'known issues' over time and as owners begin to rack up the miles on them. The Sport Classic line has these, but they're minor (in my mind), and mine has never had a hiccup in 7000 miles to date.

Last, if it's possible, see if you can find someone that has a dirt bike you can play around on. Spend several weekends on one, and using the clutch and gear shift will become second nature. You really need to get to the point that shifting is something you don't even think about. In an emergency situation, this is critical.

...I think I just wrote a book...sorry about that...:eek:
 

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+1 on RossaGT's comments

. . .plus a few of my own. On the GT vs. the Bonnie or Thruxton, I'm thinking that you'd find the the GT and Bonnie to feel pretty similar leg-wise, but the Thrux might cramp you up. Personally, I think a guy your height would find the GT's slight sport (forward leaning) position better than the Bonnie's as you'd get less windblast. Even though the GT has a slightly larger engine than the Bonnie\Thrux, it gets better mileage. I've yet to burn a pure highway tank in the 2300 miles I've had mine, but get 50-54 mpg mixed city\freeway (stock ECU\exhaust). Also, the GT's superior power\weight ratio makes it better for 2-up IMO. My passengers say the seat's real comfy.

Prior to getting a GT, I was strongly considering the Triumph Scrambler (same engine as the Bonnie\Thrux but tuned for broader torque). One of the things that made me go for the GT though was knowing I'd always have plenty of power on tap to help keep me safe when high speed acceleration is necessary to put some space between myself and cars. With the GT this is effortless - just tuck and roll that throttle!
 

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The "Comfort Seat" for the GT is preferred by most passengers.

The GT is "capable" of doing everthing you are asking about. Is it the best choice for such duty? Not really. A 6xx series MultiStrada would probably be the best Ducati for all your criteria (if you don't find it ugly), or an ST if you were comfortable with the more forward seating. They both have superior luggage and passenger seating

Any of the similar Japanese bikes are going to be far more fiscally practical, as far as both initial cost and maintenance, and a BMW would probably fit your large frame better than the Ducatis. BMW's also having extraordinarily good luggage, VERY good passenger accomodations, and are designed for racking up lots of trouble-free miles. But, if you WANT a Ducati, then you want a Ducati. And if you WANT a GT, then you want a GT - and there's nothing wrong with that.
 

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woah,slow down when you go fast there fella.from a scotter to a gt?thats one hellofa leap.learn how to shift them gears first be
fore blowing a ducati clutch or trans,$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
 

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I moved from a much smaller scooter to a GT1000, so far with no problems at all. An advantage that I had was that I had driven a manual transmission car for almost 30 years so although I needed to learn the controls, I didn't need to learn the concept of a clutch and gears. A dirt bike for a few weeks sounds like a good idea if you can swing it, but if you've comfortably ridden one of those maxi scoots in real world traffic for a while I don't think a GT is a ridiculous jump. It's not twist and go and certainly requires a new skill set but it can certainly be done. Definitely wait a bit before you ride two up.

Good luck with whatever you choose.
 

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I have been quite happy with the GT

I agree with what most of the other posts have told you. The GT is comfortable, powerful, and light to handle. I am 105kg and 5' 10". The only two negatives I have found after the brief 2000km I have had the bike are it is not smooth for low speed traffic manuvering and the Ducati windshield I bought with the bike is a bit too low and it imparts torque to the front forks.

I use the bike for daily commuting in Singapore. Its great in the morning because I leave early and the roads are almost all mine. The afternoon on the other hand is a stop and go affair. The GT chatters and chugs at low speeds if you don't keep it reved and slip the clutch in the low gears. On the other hand when I escape across the bridge to the wide open spaces of Malaysia on the weekends it truly is a pleasure indeed. Two up riding and long distance travel are a pleasure.

I have a BMW R1200ST back in the US that is my daily bike. Its windshield is attached to the chassis rather than the forks so the steering is not affected by wind speed. On a big heavy cruiser the fork mounted windshield probably doesn't make any difference but on a light bike like the GT wind does affect the steering. I have gotten used to it and I don't find it so disturbing as when I first got the bike. It rains alot in Singapore and the windshield offers protection from stinging drops. I find I need tilt my head down a couple of inches to avoid strong wind eddies around my helmet. For a tall person like you the windshield would be really short.

With all that said the GT is a great bike. It is not the smooth precision machines that my BMW's are. The build quality looks good but I am told it is prone to corrosion. There is no ethanol in Singapore gasoline so I'm not worried about gas tank troubles. The GT has a punch and a quickness that the Beemers lack. It has the character I was looking for when I got a Ducati.
 

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Adam,

I am 6'4" and 230 lbs...so a little shorter and a bit heavier than you are. I find the GT1000 very comfortable and have done several very long days in the saddle with no issues. I think the ergonomics are a nice blend of comfort and sporting posture....and since the saddle is big and mostly flat you can move around a bit which helps keep the butt from getting numb. With your height the seat height is not an issue. It is nice being able to put two feet flat on the pavement when stopped and I do not find the bike cramped at all.

As far as buying this as your first "real" bike I think you will hear many different opinions. Mine is that although it is a relatively large and powerful bike (not by big sportsbike standards I suppose but still powerful enough to cause trouble if not resepcted) you will be fine with practice and the correct attittude.

I bought my GT1000 after not riding for 13 years. I too was concerned about riding the bike since it had been so long since I last rode. I had the bike delivered to my house so that I would not have to make my first ride in traffic with no practice. I then rode to some empty parking lots early in the AM and spent several house practicing low speed manuevers, adjusting to the clutch, etc...with no other distractions. You do not want to be trying to merge into traffic if you are not practiced with the clutch, etc...

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks all! That is very very helpful. A few points from what everyone has said.

I don't spend too much time in slow traffic, some, but not too bad. Although I will be commuting I am lucky to work in the opposite direction of the local traffic flow.

The price and running of the bike does not worry me too much (famous last words). I expect it to cost a bit to run, but still it is nice to have an idea of what I would be getting into.

I am not too stressed about making a safe transition to gears (maybe I should be), although the clutch might suffer some early wear. I have spent alot of safe time on the road in the last few years and am fairly cautious!

There was some suggestions of buying some kind of more practical bike. If being totally practical was my main concern then I would stick with the scooter. I just don't want to buy a bike which is a pain in the butt to use and totally unsuited to everyday riding.

I am not generally really interested jap bikes, or even most modern styled bikes. Much prefer SC/triumph/ or even a sportster. Seems the GT1000 would suits my needs the same or better than these, and is generally recognised as a better (if more expensive) bike?

Thanks again for the advice. I will re-read it and do some more searching. I was at the local ducati dealership today, just need to tee up a test ride now. The Bike feels good to sit on. One of the more comfie bikes I have sat on.

Adam
 

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Adam - not sure where you're located, but you might check around for a demo or consignment bike. When I bought mine (consignment) this spring, I had a number of demo and new '08 and '07 models to choose from, all well below MSRP. But even at MSRP, I think they're worth it when you consider the engine, frame, Brembo brakes, and the overall performance.

I'm by no means a man of means:), but personally I think just owning a distinctive bike with the cachet the name Ducati carries is worth a little more anyway. I've had mine nearly 4 months and the only other GTs I've seen were one day when I was in the shop two other GT owners happened to be there as well. When people find out I have a bike, they typically ask "What do you have - a Harley?" The "Ooohs!" I get when I cooly reply "Actually, it's a Ducati" are worth every cent:cool:
 

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Get the bike. At six five, you'll be a challenge to fit on most any bike. At least get one that has a motor that'll keep you entertained for awhile. Get the Ducati GT. Don't be over intimidated by the engine or shifting it or that stuff. If you can survive the street on a scooter, you'll do fine with the extra power, mobility and visability the bike will bring. It's not like this is a "Busa or something with so much power that'll throw you.
 

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I'm 6'4", 210. I looove my GT. I call it my 'commuter' bike. Stock, except for the 14T, FatDuc, and bar-end mirrors. The bike fits remarkably well. I ride two-up once in a while. Power is never an issue... unless I'm in a 25mph zone ;-)

The bike is great around town -- very manageable. The bike has plenty of power on the two-lane highway rides with my friends. (Most of my riding pals are on Harley's/cruisers.) The bike does fine at interstate speeds, but I would rather be on a faired bike at 80+ mph... but that's just me.

I find it a great all-around bike. I prefer to take something else if I'm doing overnight touring. I don't think you'll be disappointed with what you describe.
 

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I wrote the following many moons ago. I still have both bikes, and ride them regularly.



Well, when I bought the T100, I had not ridden in 25 years, and it was the British cool of the bike that got me back on two wheels. I went for the T100 v. the standard because of the extra instrumentation, chrome, and tank paint. I never regreted the decision, and found the T100 to have good manners, adequate power (I've had it to 115 mph, and still accelerating), and very little vibration. It's comfortable around town, but is not an all day highway machine. Fit and finish are excellent. Nobody does chrome better than Triumph! I've had no reliability issues at all, but the only mods I've done to the bike are to add OEM chromed fenders (a la 1968), low seat grab bar, and centerstand kit. It's been a marvelous bike to ride, with lots of retro British style in a throughly modern package. I love to look at the bike. I've had people follow me to a stop thinking that it was a restored T120, and then be amazed that it is new. I have no regrets in having owned this bike, and indeed have kept it after I bought the Ducati.

Now on to the Ducati. I bought it because it's beautiful, knowing little about it before I rode it home. Where all aspects of the Triumph can be described as really good, the Duc in comparison is excellent. Really, the two are hardly comparable to each other. Again, think of any comparison point. The Triumph is really good, and the GT is excellent. The GT has an enormously powerful but controllable engine, with razor sharp handling that is still quite forgiving. The T100 is good in the twisties; the GT is inspired. Brakes on the GT are state-of-the-art, and amazing. The GT has the best gear box that I have ever ridden, with six speeds. No second nudges, "just to be sure": you just think about being in the next gear, and you're there. (I'm forever be trying to nudge the Triumph into a sixth gear that it just does not have.) I'd say that the quality of the two bikes is uniformly excellent, but Triumph has the better parts network. That said, I've needed very little for either bike, but you might have to wait for a back order on the Duc; whatever you need for the Triumph drop ships from Georgia yesterday.

The GT is 50 lbs. lighter, has 20% more displacement, and gets 53 mpg v. 38 for the T100. The EFI of the GT is amazing. Never a stumble, burble, or pop; perfect idle when cold or hot, and no choke. (The T100 gets EFI this year. . .)

It's probably a real cop out to say that you'll love either bike, but you will. Still, the GT will raise your level of riding skill and enjoyment to new levels. I have a choice of which bike to ride, and I almost always choose the Ducati. I doubt if I've put 500 miles on the T100 this year. The GT? 5,000.

Well, probably way to many words here, but I hope that this helps. Good luck and best wishes!


Since, I've discovered that the Triumph gets over 50 MPG on the road. I suspect that it's the heavy flywheel that drops the around-town MPG so much. EFI may help, but don't know for certain.
 

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just a coupla points

Hi Guys,

Yep the GT has loads of character but it does have it's failings for an expensive motorcycle. The suspension is substandard both front and rear, no steering dampner, heavy wheels with tubed rubber. I have only had my GT for about 6 months and in addition to the base price I have added $2500 for rear shocks, $900 for front forks $800 odd for a dampner $1000 for lighter wheels.

In Australia a new GT is $20K on road.....

You can argue that stock is fine for "crusin"....but at the premium we pay to have the Ducati logo on the tank and the reputation for a great handling motorcycle that goes with that logo...sorry I just reckon that Ducati are being greedy putting substandard suspension on these bikes.

I won't have won any friends with my opinion & I love my GT to bits and it reminds me of my Italian girlfriend from a few years ago....loud, sexy & demanding! :D

Cheers

Roger
 

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I agree with the mods you made, and that Ducati should have done it right to start with, but very comparable improvements can be made for more like $300-$400 for wheels, $400-$500 for forks, and $500-$700 for shocks. I'm sure you're choices are lovely and effective, but you can get comparable performance for much less. They wouldn't be all new parts, but they'd work.
 

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I agree with the mods you made, and that Ducati should have done it right to start with, but very comparable improvements can be made for more like $300-$400 for wheels, $400-$500 for forks, and $500-$700 for shocks. I'm sure you're choices are lovely and effective, but you can get comparable performance for much less. They wouldn't be all new parts, but they'd work.
Roger is talking about kangaroo dollars:D
 

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Yep....a mixture of Kangaroo Dollars and wanting it to be as good as it could possibly be. A lot of what I have done is new ( except the ex-wasp ex stressfest excel rims). My GT is quite lovely to ride now so the mods were well worth it. The Wilbers rear shocks are sensational. Ebay and this very forum has been excellent....without this forum I would have sold the GT...quite disappointed. Thanks to all that have helped make my GT a lovely ride.

Cheers guys

Roger
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yep....a mixture of Kangaroo Dollars and wanting it to be as good as it could possibly be. A lot of what I have done is new ( except the ex-wasp ex stressfest excel rims). My GT is quite lovely to ride now so the mods were well worth it. The Wilbers rear shocks are sensational. Ebay and this very forum has been excellent....without this forum I would have sold the GT...quite disappointed. Thanks to all that have helped make my GT a lovely ride.

Cheers guys

Roger
Hey Roger, Thanks for the feedback. How do you think the sport 1000 compares? Is the riding position different mainly becasue of the handle bars? Is the sport1000 any better in the areas that you are highlighting? ie suspension, alloy wheels and tyres? I am still trying to get a proper understanding of the differences, and what they really mean. Would all the extras you have installed also be necessary for a sport 1000 too?
Thanks for the advice.
Adam
 

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The Sport 1000 has identical forks, but better Sachs rear shocks that are fully adjustable.

I'd +1 what Majorsoftie said about shopping for parts. Really, these bikes are very capable in stock form. If the forks are harsh or too soft, new springs for about $150 or less can help, or simply changing the fork oil to lighter or heavier. This is what we used to do to bikes before they had adjustments for compression and rebound dampening.

I bought my forks from a member here for $350 plus my stockers. A lot of guys will put their bike back to stock before selling it, and sell the upgrades here.

Another member changed his shocks on a Sport 1000S, so I bought his Sachs shocks from him for $400. They were perfect with less than 2000 miles. Ducati retails these same shocks for $1600.

It's really best to get some saddle time in before deciding what you might like to change anyway. A lot of what we all do to our bikes isn't necessary, we just get bit by the 'mods bug' and can't stop...:)
 
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