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I think I will weigh in here as well. I have lots of experience on liquid cooled Ducatis and own an 08 Hyper 1100S.
First things first ...The air cooled 2 valve Ducati is considered an Iconic motorcyle engine and rightly so. It is very reliable and quite simple to work on. Most of the bugs got worked out on that motor long ago. Provides a very clean and uncluttered look to the bike.

My Hyper is fitted out with pod filters, a cobbled together "full" exhaust system and a reflashed ECU. Thing runs like a champ and is very light and has plenty of power. The S model with the forged wheels and the big Brembo Monoblocs has sublime handling and great braking. When I take it to deals gap I can run past the liter bikes. I rarely have to use the brakes tho because of the engine braking.

It is a mechanical symphony of clattering clutch and intake. People look at it like it is from a different planet. It is simply the best all around town bike, sport bike, canyon carver. Like a dirt bike on steroids with a bad attitude.

The Evo SP models (highest spec'd versions) decked out with tons of mods can be had relatively cheaply compared to the new more high tech models. I guarantee you would not be disappointed with an air cooled Hyper.

They will get a bit more scarce in the future I would imagine.
 

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Mexican Ducatista
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I really do want to get my ass onto a track to learn a bit more about aggressive riding and I was hoping to do that with the hyper. If i dumped my 2018 KTM SDR I'd probably cry. lol.
The 1100 can be good to learn on the track. But if you become addicted to the track you will need more power. Because all the superbikes will get past you in the straights. Ducati's desmodue engine provides great low rpm torque, (great for the canyons) but on track straights it is no match to water cooled engines that peak at high RPMs. Maybe after going through the first stage of the learning curve with the hyper you might become confident enough to get the SDR into the track, as it will be better suited for that.

You're absolutely, 100% right on the money with your closing statement. Unfortunately, I dont have access to an 1100 so test riding one is not in the cards.
Imagine that you decide to go for the 1100.
Wouldn't you need to find one and arrange a meeting to ride it before you actually buy it?

Do the same thing: Find one and arrange a meeting to ride it.
You will still have the last word before actually buying it. The potential seller should be aware that you will not buy a bike without a small test ride. He should be willing to provide the test ride if that gets him closer to close the deal.

IMHO that is the only way to know for sure that the bike you decide to buy, was the right one for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
The 1100 can be good to learn on the track. But if you become addicted to the track you will need more power. Because all the superbikes will get past you in the straights. Ducati's desmodue engine provides great low rpm torque, (great for the canyons) but on track straights it is no match to water cooled engines that peak at high RPMs. Maybe after going through the first stage of the learning curve with the hyper you might become confident enough to get the SDR into the track, as it will be better suited for that.



Imagine that you decide to go for the 1100.
Wouldn't you need to find one and arrange a meeting to ride it before you actually buy it?

Do the same thing: Find one and arrange a meeting to ride it.
You will still have the last word before actually buying it. The potential seller should be aware that you will not buy a bike without a small test ride. He should be willing to provide the test ride if that gets him closer to close the deal.

IMHO that is the only way to know for sure that the bike you decide to buy, was the right one for you.
Ha, great points.

We have relatively "small" tracks down here local to me in Florida so im not too worried about straight line speed. Its awesome and all but its pretty easy to go fast in a straight line with minimal skill. Also ,sport bikes with clip on's dont work for me ergonomically due to some injuries that I have so handle bar based bikes are my jam.

As far as test riding an 1100....erf. The problem is...I live in Florida. 99% of sellers down here will only let you turn the darned bike on. I have two bikes im interested in so we will see who will let me ride it to find out if i dig it.

The awesome deal that I had lined up on a left over 2019 fell through as the bikes sold while I was out working in this crazy world we live in today. This is causing me to lean more towards the 1100 as the pricing is marvelous and some of that character that you guys were talking about is actually exciting to me. I love the sound of a rattle trap dry clutch. :)
 

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Shame your not closer OP. I'd let you take mine for a run. Totally stock as of now. I can help with a purchase as well. I belong to the FZ1 forum. A pal in Georgia is selling an 1100 supposed to have been the Duckshops test mule for parts made. I was contemplating it but, I gotta watch my money as health issues are spoiling my fun. I'd say it has everything I'd want to do and a touch more.
Send me a PMif interested, I can forward pics and information to you. Be glad to help out anyway I can.
 

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Don’t worry about lack of power at the track. So what if superbikes pass you on the straights? I tracked my hyper once at Little Tally (Jennings sister track) and it was an absolute blast. I’ve since gotten a 900SS for tracking. Older, smaller version of the hyper’s motor. For Jennings, the 1100 hyper will be wonderful. The braking ability of that bike will boggle your mind.
 

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I have no issues running advanced pace at JenningsGP on my Hyper with street tires. I've run it a couple of times while I was waiting on suspension service on my regular track bike.

If you can make your way to Tampa, for a beer, I'd let you take a spin on my HyperS.

t_bare
 

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One thing to keep in mind if you test ride an 1100 hyper they cant breath stock when you open
up the air box or change to stacks and free up the exhaust the engine comes alive its a nite and
day difference on the air cooled 1100.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I have no issues running advanced pace at JenningsGP on my Hyper with street tires. I've run it a couple of times while I was waiting on suspension service on my regular track bike.

If you can make your way to Tampa, for a beer, I'd let you take a spin on my HyperS.

t_bare
I'm not too worried about any of that stuff guys. For me, if racing becomes my "thing" im without a doubt simply in it to enjoy it.
 

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Do you want to do most/all of the maintenance?

Yes= 1100
No I prefer to have someone else do it ( and can afford it) then 950 is fine.

You like a bike that revs to high rpms and makes power to the limiter?
yes= 950, 4 valves always breathe better at high rpms so more power up there.
No= under 6500 rpm the 1100 will have probably 10hp on the 9950 and above the 950 will go on to make 20=rwhp more. If you like to run at lower mid range rpms then the 1100 will be better.

Next time you take a ride pay attention to what rpms you are in most of the time, most come out of corners right where you live on a 1100 so the bike simply rockets away where on a 4-valve bike you need to pay attention to keep the prms higher for the same effect.

Both are good bikes but as a mechanic I would take the 1100 without hesitation, no benefit to me to have extra power up where i would not use it (without undue attention from police) . The complexity of how the 950 is assembled just takes away from the fun as it is a mess of assembly.

The rider aids are good and something to consider if you are concerned with power output being a bit more than you are ready for. I have newer riders who ride around on bikes that are more powerful than pro superbike racers used to get (all the fun but none of the skill). The nice thing is they can press a button and lose 1/2 the power and gain a safety net to allow them not too become lawn darts, as they improve they do not need a bigger bike they simply press that button again. Lawn dart mode ACTIVATE!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Do you want to do most/all of the maintenance?

Yes= 1100
No I prefer to have someone else do it ( and can afford it) then 950 is fine.

You like a bike that revs to high rpms and makes power to the limiter?
yes= 950, 4 valves always breathe better at high rpms so more power up there.
No= under 6500 rpm the 1100 will have probably 10hp on the 9950 and above the 950 will go on to make 20=rwhp more. If you like to run at lower mid range rpms then the 1100 will be better.

Next time you take a ride pay attention to what rpms you are in most of the time, most come out of corners right where you live on a 1100 so the bike simply rockets away where on a 4-valve bike you need to pay attention to keep the prms higher for the same effect.

Both are good bikes but as a mechanic I would take the 1100 without hesitation, no benefit to me to have extra power up where i would not use it (without undue attention from police) . The complexity of how the 950 is assembled just takes away from the fun as it is a mess of assembly.

The rider aids are good and something to consider if you are concerned with power output being a bit more than you are ready for. I have newer riders who ride around on bikes that are more powerful than pro superbike racers used to get (all the fun but none of the skill). The nice thing is they can press a button and lose 1/2 the power and gain a safety net to allow them not too become lawn darts, as they improve they do not need a bigger bike they simply press that button again. Lawn dart mode ACTIVATE!
What a great post! Thank you!

I do my basic oil changes and everything else is left up to the dealer. With the 1100 I have a buddy that has a higher degree of knowledge with me where we could probably work on the bike with zero issues. Still more complex things are generally left to a dealer so its mostly a non issue either way. I do however appreciate that perspective as I personally am more inclined to tinker with less "complex" machines as I have less fear of breaking shit. Electronics, as much as I love them, i'm genuinely afraid of them lol. Its not so much the fact that something might break, its the fact that IF i break something, its probably going to cost a fortune to repair/replace.

Given that I live in Florida, most of my riding is done at higher speeds. The "average" speed on the highway here is 85 regardless of a 65 MPH speed limit lol. Most roads generally see speeds in excess of 55-65 depending on where you are. The hyper for me would be more of a short jaunt style bike where ideally, im taking it on lower speed roads but again, generally speaking, to get there, it requires a longer ride on a larger stretch of road, ie a highway that will require some top end grunt.
 

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One thing to keep in mind if you test ride an 1100 hyper they cant breath stock when you open
up the air box or change to stacks and free up the exhaust the engine comes alive its a nite and
day difference on the air cooled 1100.
This is true. But then, you'll be wanting to change to stacks anyway, because you need to in order to fit in the CA Cycleworks 6-gallon gas tank. ;)

PhilB
 

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100mph would be no issue for either bike just know you will be using 6th and find yourself in the higher end of the rev-range. I would think with either bike the greater issue with long high speed runs is that neither bike is really made with wind protection. I honestly would prefer a monster over 100mph due to you woould be more low and able to get down on the tank. With a hyper you are bolt upright and a sail. Not bad for short runs but I don't think it is much fun foor long runs over 100mph.

If you want to know which would be faster on the top speed I would say 950 but after 120mph I would be rolling off because it is as much fun as riding a superbike at 10mph.

dyno runs with bike #1 with pods (red run)
Bike #2 with stock airbox
Both with termi side mount exhaust systems
I also have hyp1100 that have pods with less power than either of these. I look at the airbox and think it HAS to be restrictive yet I have not seen big gains when they are removed.
Driveability airboxes are usually better bbut in the case of a hyper 1100 the tank size would push me towards a california cycleworks tank and pods.

Magsz
I also would ask yourself if you are the type to keep a bike forever. If yes I think down the road 20 years from now the 1100 will be easier to keep running due to the lack of electrics that are combined. Ducati starts thinking of discontinuing parts after 10 years so a ecu that has already been hacked means you can cross purpose parts for years to come. The 950 may get there but???
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I'm definitely not the type of person to keep a bike forever. However, I'm in a financial place to do so at this time but again, I like new things every now and then so I tend to horse trade them out more often than not.

I say that while I'm considering my third bike. :p

The top speed thing isnt' a huge deal for me as i'm not interested in doing bonneville salt flats racing with either. I also wont lie though and say that my buddies and I tend to do some stupid shit while we are en route to where we want to ride...So speed is definitely necessary. It doesnt necessarily have to be comfortable. Like you said, either bike will get me there, its just a matter of how much I can stand it when I get there. :p All very salient points.

I'm still searching for a decent deal for a hyper around me. Ive narrowed it down to two bikes but i'm a little confused by the nomenclature that maybe someone can clarify for me.

The 1100 came in three models?

1100
1100S
1100S Evo?

Am I off base here?
 

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1100 and 1100S were the dual spark motor from 2007-09. The 1100 is the base model with the 1100S being the higher spec model (M4 Monoblocs, Marchesini forges aluminum wheels, better suspension, carbon fiber decor).

1100 EVO and 1100 EVO SP were the EVO motor from 2010-12. I believe it’s quoted at 95 hp (90 hp for DS motor). Similar to above, the first is base, second is the higher spec model.
 

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For the extra money you would spend on the 950, you can turn the 1100 Evo SP into a featherweight beast. I have mine down to 380lbs full fuel ready to ride. Here's a pic of my 3 "forever keeper" bikes.
IMG_2014.jpg
 

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Engine wise base and S are the same (IIRC) S gets you forged aluminum wheels, ohlins rear shock and upgraded calipers. maybe a better fork. If price is close the wheels are worth while upgrade.

The evo motor is a good runner but they do not produce better power than a non-evo from what I see on my dyno. In fact if it has O2 sensors ... well look at the chart and you can see what a lean bike does to power, bottom graph is AFR and the top is lean/bottom rich.

Where the evo is hands down better is weight, nice light cases and many internals are lightened. Durability will be told in another 10 years but so far they hold up fine and long as you do not hit them in the wrong angle (crashes). Dual spark vs single? I would take dual spark any day, it was only dropped for cost reasons.
 

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Engine wise base and S are the same (IIRC) S gets you forged aluminum wheels, ohlins rear shock and upgraded calipers. maybe a better fork. If price is close the wheels are worth while upgrade.
Where the evo is hands down better is weight, nice light cases and many internals are lightened. Durability will be told in another 10 years but so far they hold up fine and long as you do not hit them in the wrong angle (crashes). Dual spark vs single? I would take dual spark any day, it was only dropped for cost reasons.
I have only heard of and seen documented issues of main bearing failures on the EVO Hyper 1100's on this site but it has been documented as a rare but real issue . Since you work on these have you seen this problem?
 

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I have changed main bearings on 748,996,750,900,st4,st4s,1000,1100. and 1200 to date. Main bearing failure can be a defective part or poor oil maintenance (leaving dirty oil in for too long). I do not see any one model having the issue but I do check condition of the oil when I look at a used bike. If the owner is lax on maintaining a bike you often see it and if it is simply parked with old ,dirty and acid filled oil then bad things can happen. Yes just like salvage yard bikes (ebay motors) and "cheap" used Ducati's.

I just rebuilt a 1100 from spun rod bearings and have a 996 main bearing failure in the shop right now. neither is a issue specific to any one model as much as the life they have lived.
 

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On the main bearing issue, I bought my 2011 1100 EVO from a fellow forum member. He’d had the failure and dropped like $4K having it rebuilt, different ball count bearings went in. I’ve added 5K miles and it hasn’t missed a beat. These are righteous bikes, I’ll be hanging on to mine for a while.
 

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Where are you located? I am in Gainesville. More than welcome to come take her for a rip and I'll hop on the Multi. Granted, my bike is about 50lbs less than OEM 1100evo sp, the characteristics are the same... Just more wheelies.
 
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