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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have a little 749/999 envy here. I have a 749 Dark, and I realized it doesn't have the adjustable swingarm pivot. What is that for anyways?

Is it to optimize the chain line if you change your gearing? Or perhaps its because you have a different ride height preference?

And, selfishly, does anyone know where the Dark is compared to the normal adjustable settings on the other bikes. Is it in the low or the high, or in the middle?

Thanks!
 

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rustysrustyduc said:
Hi,

I have a little 749/999 envy here. I have a 749 Dark, and I realized it doesn't have the adjustable swingarm pivot. What is that for anyways?

Is it to optimize the chain line if you change your gearing? Or perhaps its because you have a different ride height preference?

And, selfishly, does anyone know where the Dark is compared to the normal adjustable settings on the other bikes. Is it in the low or the high, or in the middle?

Thanks!
It's a secret...if we told you, we'd have to kill you... :D
 

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An adjustable swingarm pivot allows for adjustment of the swingarm angle which lets you adjust the anti-squat/ squat characteristics of the rear suspension due to the lifting force generated by the chain (chain tangential lift).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So would changing the pivot also change ride height? I would think that small changes in the pivot, if the shock were to stay the same would result in some pretty big changes at the end of the swingarm.
 

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Yes it would, but that's not what it's adjustable for. There are other better ways to adjust ride height.

Adjusting the swingarm pivot changes the way the bike comes out of corners.

For example, if the ride heights are good and spring rates are where you want to be, compression and rebound are working good, yet the bike has a tendency to run wide on corner exits, raising the pivot would help keep it on line. It would keep the rear from compressing so much, therfore increasing rake and trail.

Conversly, if rear traction is lacking, lowering the pivot would give more weight transfer, causing the rear tire to hook up better.

There are lots of other senarios and causes to look at before one starts swapping inserts. Tire compounds, construction, profile, and pressures, spring rates and oil levels, shock linkage ratios, rake and trail figures, front and rear ride heights, weight bias, and the most important thing, what exactly is the rider doing with the throttle when he is having a problem. The varibles are many.
 
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