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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just sold my 08 1100S a couple weeks ago, after having it for 9 mths.
Why? I just could not bond with the bike. I know ppl rave about it, how fun and raw it is to carve twisties and racetracks alike... but I just could not get comfortable on it at all. I didn't come from dirt bikes, I've mostly had fully faired sport bikes. So I never did get used to that sitting up position, tall centre of gravity, long reach to the ground and massive wind blast at even normal freeway speeds. I wanted to like it, I really did. I wanted to taste what everyone raves about. But the deal breaker was the suspension... could not get it to work for me at all, just felt wallowy in turns and would not hold a line. Now I am first to admit that the problem is prob 90% me. I'm not here to trash your beloved 'tard, so hold your fire. I'm just saying that even after searching and asking the forum here for advice, I still could not get it to work in a comfortable way for me, I just had no confidence in the way it moved and tracked in corners. Again, maybe it's me and I'm just not that confident, period. In the end, most common advice received was "re-spring / re-valve / re-build / replace". It was already costing me more money than I was willing to spend, and taking more time to fix things than spent riding it. So I cut my losses, chalked it up as a failed experiment / bad partnership, and bid it adieu.

On the plus side, the torque of the engine was phenomenal, the sound was intoxicating, and the brakes were mind blowing. If only all roads were straight.... lol

So just wanted to say a big thank you to the forums in general for all the valuable information and those of you who took the time to answer my questions and genuinely tried to help. I really appreciate it.

And a special huge thanks to @GT6Racer & @hypermo for working out the solution to the low fuel level sensor failure - amazing calculations and easy to follow instructions. It was a very satisfying and cheap(!) DIY fix... and the bike's new owner thanks you as well ;)
 

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I totally get it I have been wanting a 1290 Superduke for the last few years
with them blowing out the leftovers new 2015's for 13K OTD I tried out a
few even one with the full system. It just didn't do it for me I wanted that
Scare me raw Animal that they call the Beast but I found it lacking I really
wanted to like it. Full system traction control off and it still just didn't live
up to all the Hype.
 

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I sold my R1200RT and Aprilia RSV and bought a K1300GT thinking it would be perfect. Wrong!! Never liked it.... (loved the other two bikes though)


In February we had a few very warm days (45-50 degrees). I went out for a ride and on a whim went to the Ducati store. I was really just looking. The salesman said I have plates on some of these bikes... you want to ride one?


I rode a Multi. When pulling out of the parking lot I thought wow this steering is so light, I'm going to hate this bike. Well about 30 miles later I knew this was the bike I should have bought. I bought it a month later. :grin2:


Rule#1 - always demo the same model of bike that you think you want!!
Rule #2 - if you don't like it, get ride of it.
 

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I hear you. I bought my MTS1100S last August, I've always ridden sportbikes too. It takes quite a long time to get used to the riding position, and in the long run every bike is a compromise. I had my last sportbike during the years my kids were little. I knew I'd only be going for max 2 hour fast rides on twisty roads and wasn't worried about comfort on 500 mile rides. The multi was appealing for a lot of reasons - more comfortable riding position for my 50+ year old back and wrists, the possibility of getting my wife on the back once in awhile, the ability to carry anything larger than my wallet and cellphone with me, and the reviews of mind-blowing power and handling. I am OK with the suspension setup, mine has Ohlins back and front, but you sure don't get the same front-end feel compared to a sportbike in the turns... you just gotta' put good sticky rubber on, and trust and not push hard enough to find out you crossed the limit. I've recovered from some slides over the years, but I don't think I'd be able to do much on the multi, the geometry of the bike has you way higher up off the ground, you won't be dragging any knees (or elbows!). I've had a few great rides though... you know when you get to that zen place where you're really not thinking, but you're smoking through the turns at a rapid rate of speed and it's just fun.

I still haven't put a nickel into aftermarket parts as I'm not 100% sure I want to keep it, unlike your hyper I find the multi's stock exhaust sounds more like a UJM than a Duc, it's a little too quiet for me.

Hope you find the bike that turns your crank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Didn't a number of members give you suggestions on how to address your suspension issues? Where there's a will there's a way
Yes. I deliberated for a long time before deciding not to respond to that thread anymore, but since you asked...

I only wanted to know one thing: if there were members out there who weighed similar to me and if they wouldn't mind telling me what their suspension settings were, to give me a rough starting point. I thought that was a reasonable request, as I've seen the same question asked on other forums, and even on this forum (with a different model bike) and there were many helpful ppl giving answers along the lines of:
"I weigh xx lbs, these are my settings, hope it works for you!"
"I weigh xx lbs more/less than you, but here are my settings anyway, you can tweak from there..."
"I weigh xx lbs but I like my ride harder/softer but here are my settings, see how you go..."

Instead most of the replies I got were along the lines of "you need to re-valve / re-spring / re-build / replace" when I made it clear that spending money at this time was not an option. Honestly I felt like I was made out to be a cheapskate for not wanting to throw money at it to "do it properly". But why throw money at it unless absolutely necessary? What's wrong with at least trying to get the stock stuff working properly before pulling it apart?

I also felt chastised for seemingly asking for a "miracle", a "magic number" that won't work for me no matter what. I was quite clear that I know it won't be an exact fit, that there are many environmental factors that could affect it. But I also said I DIDN'T expect a magic number, only a ball-park figure, a baseline from which to further experiment. I weigh 150lbs, and 150lbs is 150lbs no matter where you are in the world, so another rider that weighs roughly the same can absolutely give me the starting point that I need.

I don't know, maybe suspension settings are a closely guarded secret locked away with the recipe for CocaCola and the JFK assaination...

Anyway, in the end that wasn't the only reason. I would've sold it anyway - it just wasn't a good fit for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I totally get it I have been wanting a 1290 Superduke for the last few years
with them blowing out the leftovers new 2015's for 13K OTD I tried out a
few even one with the full system. It just didn't do it for me I wanted that
Scare me raw Animal that they call the Beast but I found it lacking I really
wanted to like it. Full system traction control off and it still just didn't live
up to all the Hype.
Actually a friend was selling their Duke 390 but I think it'll be too hard to give up 700cc in one hit haha

Think I might look at nakeds next... prob not such an extreme departure from what I was used to, compared with the HM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I sold my R1200RT and Aprilia RSV and bought a K1300GT thinking it would be perfect. Wrong!! Never liked it.... (loved the other two bikes though)


In February we had a few very warm days (45-50 degrees). I went out for a ride and on a whim went to the Ducati store. I was really just looking. The salesman said I have plates on some of these bikes... you want to ride one?


I rode a Multi. When pulling out of the parking lot I thought wow this steering is so light, I'm going to hate this bike. Well about 30 miles later I knew this was the bike I should have bought. I bought it a month later. :grin2:


Rule#1 - always demo the same model of bike that you think you want!!
Rule #2 - if you don't like it, get ride of it.
Rule #1 - unfortunately even the dealers here are loathe to give test rides... you have to put down a huge deposit and even then sometimes have to wait to sign up for one of their specific test ride days. It's very different to other parts of the world where they might be begging u to try their bikes. And forget about test riding for private sales - it's just not something they usually do here (except for expats maybe). Just a different market culture. On the plus side, there's usually a few very low mileage, under a year old, bikes to be had thanks to buyer's remorse lol

Rule #2 - couldn't agree more. We're not just talking about bikes here anymore, are we? hahahaha
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I hear you. I bought my MTS1100S last August, I've always ridden sportbikes too. It takes quite a long time to get used to the riding position, and in the long run every bike is a compromise. I had my last sportbike during the years my kids were little. I knew I'd only be going for max 2 hour fast rides on twisty roads and wasn't worried about comfort on 500 mile rides. The multi was appealing for a lot of reasons - more comfortable riding position for my 50+ year old back and wrists, the possibility of getting my wife on the back once in awhile, the ability to carry anything larger than my wallet and cellphone with me, and the reviews of mind-blowing power and handling. I am OK with the suspension setup, mine has Ohlins back and front, but you sure don't get the same front-end feel compared to a sportbike in the turns... you just gotta' put good sticky rubber on, and trust and not push hard enough to find out you crossed the limit. I've recovered from some slides over the years, but I don't think I'd be able to do much on the multi, the geometry of the bike has you way higher up off the ground, you won't be dragging any knees (or elbows!). I've had a few great rides though... you know when you get to that zen place where you're really not thinking, but you're smoking through the turns at a rapid rate of speed and it's just fun.

I still haven't put a nickel into aftermarket parts as I'm not 100% sure I want to keep it, unlike your hyper I find the multi's stock exhaust sounds more like a UJM than a Duc, it's a little too quiet for me.

Hope you find the bike that turns your crank.
Yeah the riding experience on a HM is so different... maybe you're right and that's the way it's supposed to feel and I just never adapted to it. But I sure didn't have the confidence to be pushing it even remotely hard enough to get anyway near the limit. I see that as a good thing tho, given Ducati replacement parts prices, dropping it is def not something I want to do lol

Yes I really miss that zen place... I miss my rides back in Australia. Not likely to replicate that feeling here in HK tho haha

I'm looking at Zed's next I think... completely different beast, but not as extreme on the spectrum as the HM
 

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I also felt chastised for seemingly asking for a "miracle", a "magic number" that won't work for me no matter what. I was quite clear that I know it won't be an exact fit, that there are many environmental factors that could affect it. But I also said I DIDN'T expect a magic number, only a ball-park figure, a baseline from which to further experiment. I weigh 150lbs, and 150lbs is 150lbs no matter where you are in the world, so another rider that weighs roughly the same can absolutely give me the starting point that I need.
Weight is not the only factor that comes into play when setting up a bike, sure it's how you start to determine a base line, lets you determine spring rates, but your riding style (which in reality, there's not going to be two identical ones) will determine a lot of what you need to feel for the bike to be "responsive" to you, not to mention the roads you are riding, the conditions, etc. all come into play and there is no magic static setting that will accommodate you for all of them (you'll make sacrifices on any settings you end up on, you just try to get the best setting for the majority of the riding style/roads you will be doing)

I personally wouldn't even give out my settings, as most probably were reluctant to, because it probably won't be a good starting point for you at all. It seems like you're a bit too afraid to make changes yourself. You should have looked up the stock settings for the suspension, set everything to "default," and started a journal on changes made. Make changes of 1-2 clicks, go for a ride, log the changes. Don't change more than one setting at a time. Rinse and repeat. This goes for any bike. This also costs nothing as long as you have some basic tools.

Even running a different type of tire within the same brand usually requires tweaking of the suspension settings, so people throwing out numbers for you really have no idea what they are doing and really are doing a disservice to you.

https://www.amazon.com/Sportbike-Suspension-Tuning-Andrew-Trevitt/dp/1893618455/

https://www.amazon.com/Techs-Motorcycle-Suspension-Motorbooks-Workshop/dp/0760331405/
 

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So long @Kookinen, I’m sorry your experience with the 1100S was not like mine but I’m glad you’re moving on. I mean that in the best way possible - you get to find a find the right bike that you can bond with, and your bike can hopefully find its way to the right rider. Even if you wanted to spend money on it, it would only go so far. Some things are too fundamental to fix.

Best of luck with your next ride(s). You know, if you liked the Hyper’s sound and brakes, but are more comfortable with fully-faired sportsbikes, I think there might just be a manufacturer that makes something for you. The name escapes me for the time being ...
 

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Rule #1 - unfortunately even the dealers here are loathe to give test rides... you have to put down a huge deposit and even then sometimes have to wait to sign up for one of their specific test ride days. It's very different to other parts of the world where they might be begging u to try their bikes. And forget about test riding for private sales - it's just not something they usually do here (except for expats maybe). Just a different market culture. On the plus side, there's usually a few very low mileage, under a year old, bikes to be had thanks to buyer's remorse lol

Rule #2 - couldn't agree more. We're not just talking about bikes here anymore, are we? hahahaha
A while back I don't think many places allowed test rides either... But now all of the Euro bike dealers have demos to let people ride. The Dealers who sell Honda, Kawi, Yamaha.... I don't think they give rides...

As for rule #2, I didn't think of that but it does apply. Maybe that one should really be rule #1? :D
 
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