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As mentioned at some point it would be best for a couple reasons to do your gearing with the rear and return to a 15t front sprocket. Until then you should be fine with the 14t asd i have never changed a worn out chain slider due to running one. It was/is a common mod and though the SS never came factory with one it's not that different from some models that did.

If you start with a longer than oem shock so you have a steep swingarm angle and you run a 14t front the chain will rest on the top leading edge of the swingarm, until you sit on the bike. this is a common track setup and we still do not see increased wear from running these angle in part due to the slider gaining clearance as you use suspension travel.

On another smoothness note I am in the process of changing flywheels on a 1200 multistrada, the stock flywheel is almost 9 pounds! I think They were trying to make this bike smoother at those super low rpms figuring with the amount of power it has most riders will spend the majority of the time at sub 5000rpms. Bruce Meyers was hypothesizing that due to the super lean emmissions they may need the extra weight to keep them from stalling but the 1200 monster has a normal flywheel. That is a lot of weight to be slinging around outboard of the main bearings at high rpms. I am fitting up a slightly modified 4 pound flywheel as the customer was nervous of dropping to 2 lbs.

Makes you wonder if the majority of riders of big bikes seldom use the power why they want it so bad? I still find my air cooled motors to be just fine for road duty but then I do not live where speed limits don't matter and there are loooonnnngggg stretches of straight road.
 

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Discussion Starter #82
I noticed the chain touching the chain guard on the swingarm but as you said, it seems okay when I sit on the bike. I don't have the longer SSie shock, just the stock one.
I might change the front sprocket back to a 15T but only when I have to replace the chain and right now it's nearly new.
For now I'm running a 14-37, when changing chain and sprockets I'll condider a 15-39 or 41.

But for now, I thought the best way to try a different gearing was by changing the front sprocket (no need for a longer chain). If I didn't like it, I just spend €20 instead of +€100 on a new chain and sprockets.

I'll keep a close watch at the chain guard and make sure my chain is set to the correct tension.

I don't expect big problems but I'll keep an eye on things.
 

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I found this old thread while googling how to get my Bimota Mantra (Ducati 900 carb engine 1998) to run smooth at low revs. Lots of good ideas like FCR 39 carbs well balanced, Ignitech ignition, gearing, new chain and sprockets, new coils leads and plug caps, new spark plugs....

Here are I few ideas were not touched on....

1. Clutch design and wear and it's effect on the drive line free play... the hammering back and forth of the clutch at low engine speed causes the bike to not run as smooth as it could. The solution (part one) is new clutch parts, basket, centre and frictions plates to minimize the slack. To solve the design aspect you need to fit one of the "quiet clutch mods" which help hold the clutch pack from slamming back and forth at low engine speeds and smooth out the bike a lot.

2. Ignition timing and cam timing.... these can be adjusted to give better low rev running. For the cam timing you will need adjustable cam belt gears. At least to get them dialed in exactly in time with each other.

3. Twin plug heads will also help some say to a degree....

I am looking for more ideas!
regards
Gavin
New Zealand
 

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Here is the list I have put together to get a carbed Ducati to run smoother at low revs. In the rough order that I would do them.... some have a very small effect, some a larger effect.... some cheap or free, some crazy expensive.... :)

Lower gearing.

Balance carbs.

Dynojet kit for standard carbs.

New chain & sprockets.

Light weight chain.

New clutch parts, basket, centre & friction plates.

"Quiet clutch mods" which stop the clutch pack from slamming back & forth.

FCR 39 carbs.

Ignitech ignition, or any good ignition with adjustable maps.

Ignition timing can be adjusted to give better low rev running.

New coils, leads, plug caps, & spark plugs.

Keep standard weight flywheel or increase weight.

Cam timing, adjustable cam drive gears to set perfectly in time with each other or advanced for low rev running.

Twin plug heads.

Engine balancing internally.
 

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I certainly have had experiences like you driving through small villages while being very careful to observe the posted speed limit. In CH they pride themselves in exact speed measurement and there's no questions about calibration of their equipment if they catch you. They confirm the accuracy - "equipment error = zero". So my '95 SS-SP went to a 39 rear sprocket and it worked very well for over 4 years while I lived over there.
 
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