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Interesting to hear duc96cr talk about corn fuel smoothness. I may be on a bit of a rant about this but my wife's 2003 Saab 9.5 puts on an engine light now with that stuff (don't laugh - she bought the car new, it only has 56,000 miles on it, goes like stink and gets 32+mpg. She won't even discuss getting rid of it). So along with smoothness consider the tank rust ethanol can cause etc. Rec fuel (real gas) is about 91 octane but still fine and available - at least here in MI. And, I have the "Pure Gas" app on my phone which ID's the closest station at any point on a trip.
End of rant.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I would modify your game plan.

1. Save the money on the coils,pickups and ignitec
2. put on the 14 tooth front sprocket
3. keep an eye out all summer for a set of good used keihins

My reason being you can do the sprocket cheap and rewards are noticeable. I love the ignitec units but I also have no issues with kokosan in fact All of my personal bikes have 100% stock ignitions even though I can buy aftermarket at cost and have a ignitec setting in the top of my tool box. I have not seen most bikes through my shop benefiting from changing these components. Plug wires yes as my dyno picks up leakage and even though you can not feel it or lose power due to it some wires are starting to break down.

I have not done back to back dyno testing on coils for performance but I know I would take oem over aftermarket from a reliability standpoint. I might change one carby coil every 8-10 years.
The ignition items list you have will be just a little bit short of the cost of a used set of keihins or almost half way to a new set.
The reason I'm thinking about the Ignitech is because I've heard a lot of good things about it. And most important; most benefit seems to be achieved in the region I'd like to see some progress (low revs).
But sadly enough, I've never seen a dyno print of an SS with Ignitech compared to Kokusans.

For now, I'm gonna stick with point 2 of your game plan. Change the front sprocket.
Maybe that change will be enough for me, who knows.
In that case, I don't need the Ignitech and stuff. Like you said; I've got no problems with my current (stock/Kokusan) ignition components. (I did change the plug wires and starter cables a few months ago).

And most important; if leaves some extra time for you guys to convince me to buy some Keihins!
:wink2:


Do we need to start a poll on how to spend BelgianDuc900SS money?
No, you don't need to do that.
Thanks anyway.
I mean really , does someone have his wife's phone number?
I do.
:wink2:
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Ehhh... Like these for example??
https://www.ebay.com/itm/264278578501?ul_noapp=true
Nudge nudge wink wing BelgianDuc900SS..!!!

:grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2:
I've seen those.
Problem is that these carbs have to be shipped from Japan to Belgium...
That means when the price of these carbs is around €900 (incl shipping), import taxes and stuff will be over €250 to get them to Belgium.
...
I can find a pair of brand new ones cheaper than that...

But thanks for the tip!
 

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Discussion Starter #45
And can we now move over to non-Keihin-stuff please?

Google seems to have noticed my interest in Keihin and on top of your attempts to convince me, I've got Google, bombarding me with Keihin-ads all day.

I've gotta be strong these days...
Never thought buying a Ducati would cause this much stress...
 

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I've seen those.
Problem is that these carbs have to be shipped from Japan to Belgium...
That means when the price of these carbs is around €900 (incl shipping), import taxes and stuff will be over €250 to get them to Belgium.
...
I can find a pair of brand new ones cheaper than that...

But thanks for the tip!
Yeah and add to that it´s only a ca. 5 hour drive from Brussels to Ottersberg, there you have your answer :grin2:
(give my regards to Hauke) :D
 

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I've never seen a dyno print of an SS with Ignitech compared to Kokusans.
Be careful of dyno runs when not talking full power runs, most dyno runs are taken at one throttle position 100% so the benefits you are looking at may not be shown on those runs. the most you will get is seat of the pants reviews from other riders unless you specifically make runs in the rpm band like you ride in , if you are doing this type of testing there will be costs that may exceed the benefit which is why no one does it. This why it will most likely be done by bored mechanics with access to a dyno and time to play.

Seat of the pants is a mixed bag, there are plenty of people who have a good feel and can get close but I also have plenty of people who think what they have is good until they see what they should be like. Bottom line if you can get it smooth to your liking and are happy there is nothing wrong with that, at some point when you have the extra cash and think you are done get the bike checked and see if there is room for improvement.

Again I do like the ignitec but see it more as a alternative than a benefit for most people, in some circumstances that will not be the case and you may see benefits based on what part of the rpm band you use.

And can we now move over to non-Keihin-stuff please?
Sure no problem! I hate Google spy but good to know it agrees with us that you need the fcr's

So do we move on to the benefits of Ohlins suspension or light wheels next? >:)
Never thought buying a Ducati would cause this much stress...
No stress intended this is supposed to be fun so be sure to tell us to go stuff it if that's the case.
 

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There is a reason Ducati riders name their bikes after women: Stress from the relationship. The reason I changed ignition components is age. Plug wires, caps, and plugs don’t last forever. If you don’t believe me, next time it’s raining, grab one of them with the engine running.
 

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There is a reason Ducati riders name their bikes after women: Stress from the relationship. The reason I changed ignition components is age. Plug wires, caps, and plugs don’t last forever. If you don’t believe me, next time it’s raining, grab one of them with the engine running.
No thanky, i was taught hands off electrical long ago, as toddlers my sister shoved a fork into an electrical outlet (long before advent of childproof plastic guard inserts)...old man went semi-ballistic with a speech on both good and bad of electrics...instilling both a respect and fear of electrics present to this day in this old boy.
 

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If you don’t believe me, next time it’s raining, grab one of them with the engine running.
Hahahahahahahahahaha literally LOL hahaha!!!
:grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2:
 

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So do we move on to the benefits of Ohlins suspension or light wheels next? >:)
Well yeah at this point in the discussion we almost have to. :laugh:
 

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Be careful of dyno runs when not talking full power runs, most dyno runs are taken at one throttle position 100% so the benefits you are looking at may not be shown on those runs. the most you will get is seat of the pants reviews from other riders unless you specifically make runs in the rpm band like you ride in , if you are doing this type of testing there will be costs that may exceed the benefit which is why no one does it. This why it will most likely be done by bored mechanics with access to a dyno and time to play.

Seat of the pants is a mixed bag, there are plenty of people who have a good feel and can get close but I also have plenty of people who think what they have is good until they see what they should be like. Bottom line if you can get it smooth to your liking and are happy there is nothing wrong with that, at some point when you have the extra cash and think you are done get the bike checked and see if there is room for improvement.

Again I do like the ignitec but see it more as a alternative than a benefit for most people, in some circumstances that will not be the case and you may see benefits based on what part of the rpm band you use.



Sure no problem! I hate Google spy but good to know it agrees with us that you need the fcr's

So do we move on to the benefits of Ohlins suspension or light wheels next? >:)


No stress intended this is supposed to be fun so be sure to tell us to go stuff it if that's the case.
Lol - When I got some spare cash to spend on mine (a genuine one owner bike) for goodies a few years back, it got the carbs, a full spaghetti exhaust, AND the Ohlins shock and spring setup - all at once. :D ...OK - the front springs actually went in last by about a year, as I'd just done the fork oil a month earlier before the goodies arrived, and wasn't inclined to pull the front apart again so soon.

Some years later, I still wouldn't change what I bought. However - an Ignitech, GSXR fork damping mod, 944 kit, wheels, ... , are all on the list for the future - mostly on a - 'if it breaks or gets broken then I'll upgrade it' basis.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
So do we move on to the benefits of Ohlins suspension or light wheels next? >:)
:laugh:

You may if you like but I don't think these things are what I'm looking for.
I never do track days and 75% of the time I use to bike to commute at speeds around 50 to 70 km/u.
So Ohlins and light wheels will be some kind of overkill for my bike I guess.

Anyway; as I am happy with the way the bike runs I just ordered a 14 tooth front sprocket and hope this makes the bike a bit more 'user friendly' a low speeds (higher rpm at the same speed, so therefore smoother running at these low speeds).

But I must admit it is tempting, all these nice, shiny, hyped, expensive parts.
But since I'm happy with the bike (being a 22 year old SS) I'm not gonna spend too much money on it (yet).
I rather spend some more money on maintenance and try to keep the bike in excellent condition then spending a whole lot of money on parts that I really don't need for my style of riding.
So next things are gonna be stainless steel brake lines, as I think my lines are still the original ones and safety is at least as important than FCR's I think.

So FCR's, Ohlins, light wheels,... are shifted to my 'when I win the lottery'-bucketlist.

Thanks to all who made a comment in this thread!! As always, your comments have been very helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Still thinking about an Ignitech anyway.
It's not that expensive (As I'm living in Europe, I can have it shipped from Ignitech for around €150).

And I once was on a dutch Ducati forum and read some great reviews about Ignitech there.

I don't expect miracles from the thing but just thinking about the theory behind it, it may be a good investment I hope.

We'll see...

I keep you posted if I should buy one.
 

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I never do track days and 75% of the time I use to bike to commute at speeds around 50 to 70 km/u.
So Ohlins and light wheels will be some kind of overkill for my bike I guess.
Just to clarify that yes at those speeds the wheels are not going to be a huge benefit.
I do often hear the belief that you need to be a racer or some such thing to benefit from good suspension, this is far from the truth. Suspension helps stabilize the bike and add comfort to the ride as well. those cobblestones would feel better if the suspension absorbed them instead of transmitting every one to your seat,footpegs and handlebars. Simple fact racers need suspension to be stable to allow them to be consistent but road riders also benefit from not having the bike dive and pitch over bumps and when brakes are applied.

You can set suspension to feel every pebble for that person trying to feel for those last bits of tire traction or to run over bumps and not transmit anything to the rider. This makes the ride more comfortable and less fatiguing with the added benefit of a bike that turns more predictably and safely. You do not need to spend huge money to get good suspension but 90% of the time it should be the first place you spend money after the bike is properly maintained.

Really the reason to do Ohlins and wheels is if you find them used they often are the cheapest modification you can do with a noticeable benefit. If you wantch the classifieds here you will see someone just sold a set of forged aluminum (light weight) wheels for about $1500 in about a week. Those wheels new are about $2000 new so if you bought them new you would have lost about $500 but the guy who bought them used will likely lose nothing when they are resold. If in good shape they should sell for about the same price in 5 years or 10 years so though the money is parked in the wheels the cost of ownership should be about zero.

Used Ohlins have similar resale especially on rare/old components as more new people are fixing /building Supersports. For modern bikes these prices are not high at all ($3000-$6000 exhausts today) so this will continue to drive prices of sought after parts higher. I have customers who are able to sell wheels they bought from me 10 years ago new for more than they paid.

I still would do the suspension next.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
Just to clarify that yes at those speeds the wheels are not going to be a huge benefit.
I do often hear the belief that you need to be a racer or some such thing to benefit from good suspension, this is far from the truth. Suspension helps stabilize the bike and add comfort to the ride as well. those cobblestones would feel better if the suspension absorbed them instead of transmitting every one to your seat,footpegs and handlebars. Simple fact racers need suspension to be stable to allow them to be consistent but road riders also benefit from not having the bike dive and pitch over bumps and when brakes are applied.

You can set suspension to feel every pebble for that person trying to feel for those last bits of tire traction or to run over bumps and not transmit anything to the rider. This makes the ride more comfortable and less fatiguing with the added benefit of a bike that turns more predictably and safely. You do not need to spend huge money to get good suspension but 90% of the time it should be the first place you spend money after the bike is properly maintained.

Really the reason to do Ohlins and wheels is if you find them used they often are the cheapest modification you can do with a noticeable benefit. If you wantch the classifieds here you will see someone just sold a set of forged aluminum (light weight) wheels for about $1500 in about a week. Those wheels new are about $2000 new so if you bought them new you would have lost about $500 but the guy who bought them used will likely lose nothing when they are resold. If in good shape they should sell for about the same price in 5 years or 10 years so though the money is parked in the wheels the cost of ownership should be about zero.

Used Ohlins have similar resale especially on rare/old components as more new people are fixing /building Supersports. For modern bikes these prices are not high at all ($3000-$6000 exhausts today) so this will continue to drive prices of sought after parts higher. I have customers who are able to sell wheels they bought from me 10 years ago new for more than they paid.

I still would do the suspension next.
I might do the suspension if I find a nice deal on some used Ohlins or any other good quality brand.

A few weeks ago I came across a Ohlins DU-235 (for the SS) in nearly new condition for only €400. They were sold by a guy who trades in second hand Ducati parts in the Netherlands.
I found these while I was having lunch at work (at 3a.m., I always work nightshifts) but could not make a payment with the computer (some security-settings from my boss did not allow that).
So i checked again when I came home (6.30a.m.) and apparently they were sold between 3a.m. and 6.30 a.m...

So yes, if I can find a good deal on some Ohlins, I might get them but it's not the most urgent part I'd like to replace since I'm quite happy with the stock suspension (which has a hyperpro spring in the back) after some experimenting with the settings.

And then again, the bike isn't the only thing to spend money on. I' married, two daughters (one in high school), 3 cars, a bike, a house, half an animal-zoo, my music instruments... So you can imagine I have no problem spending my money.
Choices have to be made and right now, I rather spend my money on holidays and city-trips with my family as my kids will not always stay with mamy and dady.

I like the Duc very much but it's far from the most important thing in my life. And I don't have access to an unlimited budget...
 

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You don't have to go all out with Öhlins stuff to noticeably improve your suspension. The stock setup is so unbalanced that even springs alone make a huge difference. Most people also never service their rear shock, and after 20 plus years it would be a miracle if the dampers still worked properly.


I did racetech gold valves and springs, in the front and back. The front can be done in any reasonably well equipped home workshop, the rear I chose to send away. Total cost was less than any aftermarket shock I could find, let alone öhlins. The bike is noticeably better to ride anywhere, and totally transformed on a twisty road
 

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Yes what he said....

The Ohlins is good and has resale oem will never have but functuion wise just a set of springs get you 75% of the improvement. If you have the rear sprung did someone also valve it when they sprung the shock? often times when someone was tearing into a carby shock they would valve especially once they saw what valve was in it. If you have a valved and sprung showa you should be quite happy. Also it is/was common when someone did one end they soon saw the value in doing the other so many bikes started with just a spring and soon had complete suspension re-do.

I have 2 kids at home myself so I fully get dividing the pie for both time and money, always a challenge. No one is saying you need to do any work all at once we are just nudging you in a direction that has worked for us when you do get the chance. I hunted and saved for 10 years to get my first set of magnesium wheels and have always found there is a relationship of parts become available when we can least afford them. Simply make a list of wants and if AT SOME POINT you come across a deal know the value in picking them up.
 
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