Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
And so I am about to pull the trigger on a 2007 Ducati Sport 1000s with a full fairing and I am stressing over it. Its modded and I won't have to do a thing. Yea, for some it’s a no brainer but as a current owner of a Yamaha Roadstar Warrior ( performance/ sport cruiser) , it’s a big switch. I had a BMW and a Yamaha and I know about the maintenance issues with Ducati's and only hear good things about this motor and I know there have been some tremendous steps in curtailing some of the costs. It's not an issue for me maintaining a bike but reliably is something I like and have enjoyed with my Yamaha. I know the Duc is not good for two up riding, it's not a tourer and from what I have read, it's about a 3 hour bike tops. My wife says she likes to ride but rarely does anyway so it’s a moot point.
In the best of both worlds, Id like to have both but the wife says, I can only have one. I like the character of the Duc, its sound, its quirks,its history and performance. I just fear it might be a bad fit for me. I have been a lurker here for about a year and half and respect the information flow. I have learned loads information and respect your opinion... so, should I? or shouldn’t I? What should other things should I be asking myself as it pertains to this bike...
thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
do it...if you hate it you can always get a yammy again....im familiar with the supersports ,but the mechanicals are basically the same as sport classics ...the 1000 air cooled motor is one of the best in motorcycling imho...easy to maintain yourself, if you're so inclined....
 

·
Master of Bumnitude
Joined
·
5,132 Posts
I wouldn't hold back due to any limitations with the bike. It is winner with loads of personality and enough performance to keep an experienced road rider happy for many a mile. But it will be an enormous change for you, especially as regards riding position. Can you arrange for a test ride?

-don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have test rode one and indeed, the riding positon is way different than what I am used to. It was a vieceral experience but I have read, the body toughens up to the postion after a few months.., at least, thats what I was told.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
I've owned 11 Yamahas since 1973 as well as a few Kawasakis and one sportster. I have been eyeballing the Ducatis for quite a long time (since I was 15). I bought my first Duc last year and I tell you what...IT IS THE BEST BIKE I HAVE EVER RIDEN! I cant get over on the power, the way it maneuvers, etc. I rode a 848 a few months back and was very impressed with that one too. Dont take me wrong, I love my Yamahas, but I give credit where credit is due. I am 47 now and can't wait to ride that Duc! it is an awesome machine.:D

PS- The riding position is more aggresive. When I rode out of the dealership I was thinking to myself "Oh man, what the hell did I just do?" it felt not that comfy and ackward. It took me like a month to get the hang of it... now I love it! DO IT! DO IT! DO IT! DO IT! DO IT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
I became interested in the sc1000 because of the looks. Finally having gotten one, I can tell you, looks aside, it's an excellent bike, and really better than I had anticpated. I've had a number of HD's, a few bmw's and a moto guzzi, and the sc is the most pleasurable of them all. And mine's totally stock. In particular, I was expecting some suspension issues, and discomfort issues due to the ergonomics. In fact, I've had no problems with either.
 

·
Master of Bumnitude
Joined
·
5,132 Posts
In particular, I was expecting some suspension issues, and discomfort issues due to the ergonomics. In fact, I've had no problems with either.
Apostate! Heretic! Jabberwockist! :eek:

-don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,821 Posts
And so I am about to pull the trigger on a 2007 Ducati Sport 1000s with a full fairing and I am stressing over it. Its modded and I won't have to do a thing.
Oh, don't worry, there's ALWAYS more to do.

Yea, for some it’s a no brainer but as a current owner of a Yamaha Roadstar Warrior ( performance/ sport cruiser) , it’s a big switch.
Here we see the biggest reason for you to run away from the Ducati screaming "NO! NO! NO!" You refer to your Warrior as a "sport cruiser." First of all, there is no such thing. There are Muscle Cruisers, and Performance Cruisers, but there are no Sport Cruisers, and, if there were, your Warrior would certainly not be one. Ducati makes Sport Bikes - real Sport Bikes - and they are an entirely different world of motorcycling from cruisers, regardless of how much power you put in that cruiser. It's like calling your 57 Chevy a "Sports Car" because you dropped a breathed-on big-block under the hood. It doesn't matter how fast you make a 57 Chevy, it will never be in any way related to a Sports Car.

I had a BMW and a Yamaha and I know about the maintenance issues with Ducati's and only hear good things about this motor and I know there have been some tremendous steps in curtailing some of the costs. It's not an issue for me maintaining a bike but reliably is something I like and have enjoyed with my Yamaha.
This is a site of Ducati lovers, so the group, in general, tends to think that Ducatis are not really that maintenance intensive or unreliable. It all depends on your perspective.

Compared to a 4-valve Testastretta motor, the valve adjustments aren't that bad. Compared to a BMW Airhead or Oilhead, they are insanely complicated, difficult, expensive, and time-consuming (for those of you who find that overly harsh, remember that a BMW Boxer valve adjustment takes less than 20 minutes and no parts).

Some other maintenance items are just inconvenient, but not difficult. Changing the timing belt, for instance, is not hard, but by the maintenance standards of the the bikes you are used to, the idea of needing to replace the timing belt every 10k miles seems outrageous. Whether or not those kinds of mantenance requirements are okay with you or not is something only you can know, but it's something that shouldn't be hard for you to figure out before you buy. And, of course, you are leaving shafts and belts behind and returning to the world of chain-drive. That means lube and chain/sprocket-life issues that you haven't had to worry about, but that's how real sport bikes are made. That issue does have the big upside of you being able to easily and cheaply fine tune the final drive ratio to your preferences and riding habits. The down-side is that it is an absolute necessity that you do so since Ducati has horribly over-geared these bikes to help them meet noise and emissions standards.

Reliability is definitely not at the level of a Yamaha cruiser or any BMW. Can you imagine BMW owners being told not to let their bike get wet because their electronics might all quit? Yet, the reliability of the SC's (and all new Ducatis) is huge leaps ahead of the old Ducati reputation. Are these bikes reliable compared to some of the most reliable makes/models on the market? No. Are they reliable for an Italian High-performance machine? Amazingly so.


In the best of both worlds, Id like to have both but the wife says, I can only have one. I like the character of the Duc, its sound, its quirks,its history and performance. I just fear it might be a bad fit for me.
Well, this is a problem. The number one reason I think it's a problem is because, while I think Ducatis are absolutely wonderful bikes, and everyone should have one, I also think anyone who has a Duc as their only motorcycle is nuts. There are people on this board who feel differently, but you will notice that a very large percentage of the people on this board own more than one motorcycle (I currently have four).

If you can't own them both (always the best solution), then I would talk to the wife and tell her that you really need some time to decide which one it's going to be. Buy the Duc, and give it this one summer. Then, sell one of the two. By the end of the summer you should know whether or not the Duc is really the right fit. If riding the Duc gives you the joy that it brings us, then you'll happily learn to live with everything else. If it doesn't, you will have learned something important, and had your one memorable summer with a beautiful Italian Sport machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
Here we see the biggest reason for you to run away from the Ducati screaming "NO! NO! NO!" You refer to your Warrior as a "sport cruiser." First of all, there is no such thing. There are Muscle Cruisers, and Performance Cruisers, but there are no Sport Cruisers, and, if there were, your Warrior would certainly not be one. Ducati makes Sport Bikes - real Sport Bikes - and they are an entirely different world of motorcycling from cruisers, regardless of how much power you put in that cruiser. It's like calling your 57 Chevy a "Sports Car" because you dropped a breathed-on big-block under the hood. It doesn't matter how fast you make a 57 Chevy, it will never be in any way related to a Sports Car.
Nicely said, Major! I only picked one excerpt but your entire post was very well said.

I loved my GT and now love my Hyper but I don't think I'd be "comfortable" if either was my only vehicle. For city riding, I far prefer my scooter to any motorcycle but the GT and Hyper are both satisfactory. A Sport, on the other hand, would be pure misery for me in the city.

My Ducati is for recreation. I hesitate to call it a toy, but I do not have to depend on it for my everyday livelihood. However, looking back over the past 2 years, I think there was only one time I would have been left out in the cold because of my Duc. Others have been luckier than me while others have had far worse luck. Still, knowing that I have my scooter for my everyday commute, there's no motorcycle I'd rather own than a Ducati. They're everything I want in a bike.

Sure, I'd love a BMW or something else for long distance rides but it's not going to happen until I have more parking space. For now, for the type of riding I do most often, a Ducati is pure joy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Good information, thanks for keeping it real. I appreciate the candor and point blank opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I recently traded my GT1000 for a Sport 1000s, and although the riding position for me was a bit more committed, my wife commented that the passenger seat was more comfortable than the standard seat on the GT. This surprised me a little but my daughter agreed with my wife when she rode on back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
How long of a test ride did you do? When I first bought the bike I experience terrible pains in my neck after 15 minutes of riding. Finally I ditched the full face helmet and got a really light 3/4 helmet and the pain eventually went away and I don't experience it anymore. But a lot of people have sold their bikes because of discomfort.

The bike is a blast to drive and it is plenty fast. Lose your license fast. Strangers give me compliments on my bike all the time.

On the negative I broke my rear brake light cover and it took 4 months for the part to come from Italy. After 2 months the dealership took a brake light off a new bike and gave it to me.

Also, my bike broke down to the dreaded gas line problem. I only have 5000 miles on my bike though. I am sure someone with more mileage on their bike could give you a more realistic reliability view.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,821 Posts
How long of a test ride did you do? When I first bought the bike I experience terrible pains in my neck after 15 minutes of riding. Finally I ditched the full face helmet and got a really light 3/4 helmet and the pain eventually went away and I don't experience it anymore. But a lot of people have sold their bikes because of discomfort.
I know that even if my hands and wrists could handle the Sport's riding position, I could never ride that machine with my current helmet. The top of the opening is much too low for a really leaned forward position. I wonder how many people even consider that they may simply need a different helmet to ride in that seating position?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
It was a vieceral experience but I have read, the body toughens up to the postion after a few months.., at least, thats what I was told.
Nah, that isn't true - you need to be hard to start with :rolleyes:

In all seriousness though pull the spacer pins (if not done already) and find a light helmet, this helps a lot to take the strain off your neck. Once you are over 80kmh (50mph) the weight is pulled off of your arms and this makes the bike a pleasure to ride, also once you are in the twisty stuff you will understand why the position is the way that it is :cool:

Just buy it.

And as a final point; never, repeat never try to commute on it or you may begin to hate it with a passion - use your rice burner for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I have vespa for my daily comute. Good tips so far and am glad that the wind plays a factor in the comfort. This would be my first sport bike so I understand the comfort and what the bike is desiged to do. Sadly, I live in south florida and there arent much twisties around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Well, before falling in love with the GT1000, I took a serious look at the Warrior.

The SC line is a heckofa lot better for 2-up riding than the Warrior, assuming your bike still has the stock pillion seat.

And if you're concern is reliability rather than service cost, the Duc will serve you just fine. While the service intervals are more often and the bill fatter, you'll find the reliability to be great.

I've had my GT for over 10k miles now and she's been running like a champ. The only caveat is that these bikes normally need a bit of "dialing-in" before they run solid, and there are some definite mods that need to be done over stock.

But if this bike is already sorted...

Man, I'd pull that trigger before somebody else does -- you won't regret it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
After having BMW for quite a few years, (the last one a R1100RS) and wanted to buy a new bike for my 60th birthday, the selection was between the BMW R1200S and the Ducati SC1000S, I love the look of the Duc since I saw it on the net, but I love the simplicity of servicing and the comfort and performance of the BMW. I choose the SC1000S. I had the bike now for almost a year and twice I had to travelled 1000Km in one day i was amased how comfertable it really was, most of the other trip about 500Km, and to this day I still love this Duc when i ride it it make me feel alive and 20 year old, but I only ride for pleasure, this is not my commuter bike. My wife ride her Harley, the very few time that she a passenger she still prefer the BMW to the Duc.
Hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
go for it...

Reliability is definitely not at the level of a Yamaha cruiser or any BMW. Can you imagine BMW owners being told not to let their bike get wet because their electronics might all quit? Yet, the reliability of the SC's (and all new Ducatis) is huge leaps ahead of the old Ducati reputation. Are these bikes reliable compared to some of the most reliable makes/models on the market? No. Are they reliable for an Italian High-performance machine? Amazingly so.
I use my '07 GT as a daily commuter. I ride about 10 months out of the year -- and you can imagine the "moistness" that accompanies a pacific northwest winter... :rolleyes: It's often very wet after a day-long rain sitting in the parking lot, but has never left me stranded.

I actually sold a 250cc scooter for my SC and have *zero* regrets. I'm not getting the 55mpg as other guys around here are... I'm guessing that has to do with the 14T front sprocket... which is the only mod I've made.

I have a good buddy with a recent model Warrior... he loves my bike.

do it... do it...
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top