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Having trouble finding neutral. Two dealers have said that this is a common thing and that ST2's (1999), tend to have difficulty finding that little green light that we take for granted. Especially at a long, long traffic lights, as my hand begins to cramp up. Any guesses as to what can be the cause? I have new sprockets and new a new chain. A major tune up and it passed with flying colors. Also a new clutch slave cylinder was installed sometime ago. It changes gears just fine in all the other gears, just 1st and 2nd and finding neutral are the hidden gems that I cant find. Thanks
 

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What grade & type of oil are you running, and when did you last change it?

Craig
 

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On my 98 ST2 the culprit was a combination of air in the clutch line and the clutch stack height. Does your machine have a aftermarket slave and or an aftermarket clutch? I ended up installing a bleeder in the clutch line at the master cylinder to facilitate easy bleeding and swapped a thinner steel plate in the clutch pack. Neutral easily found and shifts great. I hope this helps.
 

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I agree that it sounds like air in the clutch line. It doesn't take much to make neutral really hard to find. I would also pull the clutch basket and plates to see if one or more of the plates is getting hung up/ not allowing full travel.
 

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Another thought just to expand. Check your shift arm, it may be out of alignment.

You will need to remove the alternator cover and it is located just above the front sprocket. There is a line on the shift arm, it should be in line with the nut/stud on the shift drum when you are in 2nd or 3rd gear. You can adjust with the bolts on the left side.

Since I learned this from LT's book (desmotimes.com), I have to give him kudos and recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It appears that my dad installed an aftermarket clutch and slave cylinder (Barnett). The bike just had a major tune up, all fluids were changed about 950 miles ago. I might try the adjustment regarding the shift arm and then work my way up the thread. I have that manual by LT Snyder. It is a god send! There doesn't appear to be any air in the line, but I will change it anyway just to cover all the bases and the dealer put in 300V, 15W50 Synestr 4L. I wanna thank everyone for the responses. Printing out the thread now for guidance.
 

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Last time I had issues on my 98, I pulled the clutch pack, measured and restacked to get the correct height and it was like butta again! I LOVE the way I just think about shifting and it goes. I never understood "snickity snick" until I got my Duc. (Now if I can just get the darn gallery plug fixed.)
 

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I've always found it easier to find neutral while still rolling, but coming to a stop, than when stopped.
 

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On my ST2, first after a cold start, when I pull the clutch lever in, I can watch the clutch tach down to zero...If you removed the 3 raized screws on your cover, you could check this also. I attributed this to the oil being a bit thicker when the engine is cold.

While you're in there, another thing is to look to see how much the pressure plate moves when you pull the clutch lever. I can see mine move about 1/8". If it's moving less than that, then you probably have air in the lines, and should bleed. Note that the aftermarket slaves sacrifice a bit of this motion...(larger slave piston will move LESS with the same displaced fluid from the master).
 

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On my 907, predecessor to the ST2 finding neutral was a real pain so I perfected hitting it as I rolled to a light, as once there finding it was hit or miss, mostly miss.
 

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Shifting to N before stopping is not always do-able, since certain folks think that sitting in-gear is safer, while you eyeball your rear view mirrors. But that method does work.

The problem is that with a small amount of clutch drag, even if you are in N...when you select 1st again, you'll get a loud POP and it's not great for the tranny.

The reason I pointed out the zero, or close-to-zero rpm clutch is that you CAN find neutral even at a standstill. It's worth checking. If I get a chance, I'll try to measure the actual amount of throw-out that I'm seeing.
 

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I measured 0.060" of clutch throw on my ST4S tonight. Note that this one doesn't tach all the way down to zero when cold, so a better number might be closer to 0.070"
 
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