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Discussion Starter #1
What would adding 1098 triple clamps with a 30mm offset do for a SF 1098?
This is for a track only bike.
Thanks for any information.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that information Shazaam.
My problem is that I don't know what I'm starting with.
Sent you a PM.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok....
From what little information there is out there on SFS offset....

I think the stock offset is 32mm, so not too much difference from the Nichols 30mm offset triples. The main reason for the triple change is to get rid of all the handlebar clutter since I use clip-ons. It would be nice to quicken the steering a little bit too.

Am I correct in thinking that the switch from 32mm to 30mm offset will do this?

Thanks again for any help.
 

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Ok....
From what little information there is out there on SFS offset....

I think the stock offset is 32mm, so not too much difference from the Nichols 30mm offset triples. The main reason for the triple change is to get rid of all the handlebar clutter since I use clip-ons. It would be nice to quicken the steering a little bit too.

Am I correct in thinking that the switch from 32mm to 30mm offset will do this?

Thanks again for any help.
No it won't quicken the steering it will in fact increase trail leading to more stability and less quick steering but if you push the forks up through the clamps sharpening the steering head angle causing a reduction of stability because of reduced trail,you will regain lost trail with the clamp you mentioned and have a sharp head angle quicking up steering
 

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Excellent move.

Many with superbikes who install risers, ergonomically friendly clip-ons, forward and lower rearsets, etc. should similarly move to a Streetfighter or other more relaxed bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
why don't you sell it and get a 1098? that would solve all of your issues and keep 2 bikes doing what they are meant to do...
Totally agree flynn, that's what a rational person would do.
It's kind of a long story. I'll abbreviate it.

I tend to get sentimentally attached to my bikes and like to keep them.
I also have two SFS's, so lots of spare parts.
And it's been a fun project which I really enjoy working on.
It's neverending, but I love spending time in the shop.

Thanks to all who have replied.
 

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Bon Vivant
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Totally agree flynn, that's what a rational person would do.
It's kind of a long story. I'll abbreviate it.

I tend to get sentimentally attached to my bikes and like to keep them.
I also have two SFS's, so lots of spare parts.
And it's been a fun project which I really enjoy working on.
It's neverending, but I love spending time in the shop.

Thanks to all who have replied.
Well, I've owned both bikes and have a sentimental attachment to them both. The 1098R has to be one of my all time most loved bikes and If I did more track days I would have kept it - hell I loved just keeping it around because it's so Damn cool. But I ride on the street and the SF does that job much better.

You never know - an SBK may capture your heart as well and give you a better starting point for your track needs.
 

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You could go with the shorter SBK swingarm, that seems like a good first step. I have thought about it even for street use.

From the early promo material, I think the steering angle got relaxed, and the swingarm lengthened to make the bike more stable when the SF1098 was released.
 

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...if you push the forks up through the clamps sharpening the steering head angle causing a reduction of stability because of reduced trail...
This is true, but of all the people I've talked to or read about that did this, no one has mentioned any instability. All I have heard is high praise in the way this sharpens up the steering and can transform the bike. I've ridden a SF pretty hard and never felt any instability, but as always keep your own council and judge for yourself. Go down 1/2 a line at a time until you hit your sweet spot.

I had a Looonggg list of mods done to my bike, SFS, and dropping the forks was the single most beneficial change to me. (Bazzaz did smooth out the lean spot)
 

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Agreed proheli I've done this mod and it does make a significant improvement with no negative effects ( mines at 2 lines showing I found 3 lines made turn in a tad quick for my liking) ,my point was theoretical and the reason and solution for the less off set yoke
 

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Yep, and I knew what you meant. I was throwing that in there for any newer riders. Mine was at 1.5 lines, and if I put it at 2 lines the bike would go down fast, but want to stay down a little too much. But what you are saying is important, and that's why think it is the last adjustment to be made when someone is trying to quicken up/ lighten up their steering.
1. Tire pressure
2. Tires
3. Sag
4. Compression and Rebound dampening
5. Raising the rear.
6. Lowering the front.

I found that on my bike, llowering the front was really the only way I could get sharp/clean direct turn in. Where I would ride a lot there was a down hill, sharp, right hander. A couple of times I could barely get the bike turning and almost ski jumped the thing off the back side. It wasn't until I dropped the front that I felt like the front tire was truly planted and trust worthy, and then the bike would come right around.
 

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I haven't experimented with rear ride height,have been dialling in other stuff first but that'll be this years priority. Now I do wonder should I just take note and adjust from where its set now or buy ride height tool to reset it to factory height then adjust,I'm aware that each chain tightening adjustment lowers the ride height
 

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I haven't experimented with rear ride height,have been dialling in other stuff first but that'll be this years priority. Now I do wonder should I just take note and adjust from where its set now or buy ride height tool to reset it to factory height then adjust,I'm aware that each chain tightening adjustment lowers the ride height
Well, the way you tell other people where your ride height is adjusted is, millimeters raised. Mine was up roughly 8mm up from 0, or no rise. Its pretty easy just to mark or note where yours is at and just screw it down to 0 to see where you started, but you can always just go up or down from where you are at to see what suits you. On my bike, so I would assume it is this way on others, going up made the bike turn lighter, less effort. I went from 0 up to 10mm and liked the new feel a lot, but could also tell it was just a bit much, so I brought it back down a couple of mm, thought it was great and left it there. So lowering the front made it turn FASTER, but not necessarily LIGHTER. It took me a bit to get my head around that. So front is rate-of-turn and rear is ease-of-turn.
 

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My SFS1098 is strictly for track use. When I picked it up in late October I went to Misano for 3 days of racing. The geometry was standard and like You guys I experienced the steering of being quite slow. I have now lowered the front by 5mm and raised the rear also by 5mm, and I'm looking forward to feel the difference at Slovakia Ring in April.

I have bought a 1098 SBK frame and with very little modification it will fit perfectly. This will sharpen the steering significantly and I might even through in a 1098 SBK swing arm. That should do the trick.
 

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Well, the way you tell other people where your ride height is adjusted is, millimeters raised. Mine was up roughly 8mm up from 0, or no rise. Its pretty easy just to mark or note where yours is at and just screw it down to 0 to see where you started, but you can always just go up or down from where you are at to see what suits you. On my bike, so I would assume it is this way on others, going up made the bike turn lighter, less effort. I went from 0 up to 10mm and liked the new feel a lot, but could also tell it was just a bit much, so I brought it back down a couple of mm, thought it was great and left it there. So lowering the front made it turn FASTER, but not necessarily LIGHTER. It took me a bit to get my head around that. So front is rate-of-turn and rear is ease-of-turn.
Cool thanks for the advice ill give it a go when the weather improves and can evaluate it properly and report back my findings
 

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My SFS1098 is strictly for track use. When I picked it up in late October I went to Misano for 3 days of racing. The geometry was standard and like You guys I experienced the steering of being quite slow. I have now lowered the front by 5mm and raised the rear also by 5mm, and I'm looking forward to feel the difference at Slovakia Ring in April.



I have bought a 1098 SBK frame and with very little modification it will fit perfectly. This will sharpen the steering significantly and I might even through in a 1098 SBK swing arm. That should do the trick.


Hi Trackfighter, how did your change go?


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