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Featured in this months "me and my bike section". My hat off to you for being a true biker! Very cool! This if proof of Ducati reliability for sure. To the guy in the article If you lurk on this forum. No offense but can I ask you if you ever heard of washing your bike and the use engine degreaser? Then it wouldn't look as though you hadn't washed it since it was new in 1993.
 

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Doesn't have time to wash it, he's out riding it...........;)


I saw that story too and thought holy crap thats a pile of miles. I would say he got his monies worth out of that monster. Ducati should buy it back from him and use for advertising.......:D:D

p.s. wasn't it in Motorcyclist not CycleWorld
 

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Ride? Wash? You decide.
 

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If it's who I think it is (haven't seen the article), he won an award at Laguna Seca for the fact that he put those miles on it. Pretty sure it was the 'Passion Award'? Really nice guy who loves his Monster, after all those miles, he just didn't care about looks as much as just riding his Ducati.
 

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160kmile Monster-Prince or Toad?

Ya, the guy was in Monterey for the MotoGP race. His bike was selected to compete in the Motoconcourso...one of 22 bikes selected out of the the 2500-3000 bikes that were there, or near there, on Ducati Island. Not to be a snob, but the other 21 bikes selected were the "creme of the crop" as selected by the Ducati folks who walked the entire Island and alternate parking lot. It was an honor just to be selected to compete in this group. Phil's "high mileage model" while notable for his passion to ride so much, was out of place against the other bikes, all of whom were ridden too, AND kept clean and polished! One of the guys in our club has a older Monster that is ridden alot and kept outside in a carport, but covered and cared for...and his bike looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor. The Motoconcourso was billed as a contest that judges those bikes that were above and beyond the norm in appearance and cleanliness....several guys who could have been selected were not...and this was just one of the reasons why they were not allowed to compete. Give the guy a passion/mileage award...but let the guys/gals who poured alot of sweat and money into the brand get recognized for their efforts to make Ducati's the Crown Jewels of Sport Motorcycling. That is what a Motoconcourso is all about, and what the crowd came to see. Across town in Carmel you will never see a car with a million miles on the odometer, but never washed or cared for, on the lawn at "The Quail" Concourse. While admirable that the car has made it that far in distance...Concourse Events are held to judge those cars that have been maintained in top condition...the jewels of the Marque...and that should have been the case at Ducati Island in my opinion.
Note: It was Ducati's Event...they can do whatever they wish. They put on one hell of an event...even in a crappy economy. They are to be commended for that commitment to their owners and fans. When you put on the party, you get to call the shots...and it was Ducati who selected the bikes as they felt fit. I'm just saying that the guy who put a lot of money and time/sweat into his effort and not to be selected to compete vs this bike with 160k on the clock, but never washed or cared for, is a slap in face to the guy who tried but didn't make the show.
 

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It's very cool that this guy has 160K on his bike, but I have no idea why people think that dirt is a badge of honor. It isn't. I rode my Multistrada out to Colorado from Oregon this summer for the AMA Women's Conference and two seperate guys from the BMW tent asked me if it was new. It wasn't a compliment, trust me. I've had this bike for 3 years and it was really annoying that after a 1200 mile ride, it still wasn't dirty enough to have 'street cred' with them.

It's like saying, 'man, I haven't showered all month - I was too busy living life and riding, baby!'

Washing your bike is respecting it. I even wash my dirt bike and it's supposed to get dirty, but I'm not a slave to it. I just don't get why you would maintain it on the inside and not on the outside.
 

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im just humbled that that guy had 160k on his monster and yet i didnt have mine for a year before i was swapping its motor for a larger one! there is something to be said for liking a bike enough to RIDE IT FOR 160K!
 

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What's surprising to me in the responses here is not so much the
amazement that Monster went 160K miles, or that Mr. Boncer had
the tenacity to stick with it so long, but that no one questioned the
ultimate veracity of the article. If we are to believe him, the only
repairs in 160K were new rings, a new clutch basket, and something
called an "alternator bearing"(?)! Does anyone here believe this is
the true and complete list of repairs? I have a gently treated '99 M750
with 28K miles, and to date the required repairs include a voltage
regulator, an ignition pickup, a clutch seal, a neutral switch and various
odds and ends. Now perhaps Mr. Boncer mentioned only repairs to
the powerplant itself, and not the bike as a whole. Who knows. Still
enough to raise an eyebrow or two. I'd strongly suspect a full and
complete accounting of monies spent would present a very different
picture. Or maybe, just maybe, that's just me.
 

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What's surprising to me in the responses here is not so much the
amazement that Monster went 160K miles, or that Mr. Boncer had
the tenacity to stick with it so long, but that no one questioned the
ultimate veracity of the article. If we are to believe him, the only
repairs in 160K were new rings, a new clutch basket, and something
called an "alternator bearing"(?)! Does anyone here believe this is
the true and complete list of repairs? I have a gently treated '99 M750
with 28K miles, and to date the required repairs include a voltage
regulator, an ignition pickup, a clutch seal, a neutral switch and various
odds and ends. Now perhaps Mr. Boncer mentioned only repairs to
the powerplant itself, and not the bike as a whole. Who knows. Still
enough to raise an eyebrow or two. I'd strongly suspect a full and
complete accounting of monies spent would present a very different
picture. Or maybe, just maybe, that's just me.
At Laguna Seca, he did go into several stories of all the maintenance, including a breakdown along the way to the Races. Most articles never go to the lengths of presenting all the facts or info, otherwise most readers would not even bother reading.
 
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