Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been dealing with a scraping/grinding noise coming from the front brakes (I assume) of my 2010 Hyper1100 EVO.

The noise can't be heard at slow speeds below 35mph or on the stand. Can hear it in 3rd gear around 45-65mph. Can also hear it when pulling in the clutch from 50-65mph also. Some days its louder than others.

I never noticed the noise until I switch from wearing headphones to a Bluetooth comm device a few months ago. Pulled off the calipers and gave them a good cleaning without breaking them apart. Took out a few pistons that I believed to be stuck and cleaned them, although they weren't that dirty. Greased the caliper pins and the back of pads. Pads are the original ones and don't seem to have heavy or uneven wear...Bike has almost 11k.

Today I put new tires on, so I had the front wheel removed. Was hoping re-installing the front wheel/calipers would solve the problem but nope.

I cannot feel any negative effects on front braking power, btw. Everything seems fine other than the scraping sound.

Was thinking of pulling the calipers off the line and thoroughly cleaning the internals....

Any thoughts and suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,013 Posts
So , you’ve spun the wheels with the bike on stands, applying the brakes, and you can’t replicate the noise ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
There are only a few moving parts that are completely speed related. Front wheel and related hardware, Rear wheel and related hardware, and the drive chain/sprockets. It can be hard to pinpoint a sound while moving, I once had a sound I could have sworn was coming from the front when it was actually a backed out bolt hitting by the chain, so it might be worth checking the final drive and rear wheel as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So , you’ve spun the wheels with the bike on stands, applying the brakes, and you can’t replicate the noise ?
No I cannot replicate the sound on stands. Seems to only happen at speeds above 40mph. I will check the final drive later today but I'm 99% sure it's coming from the front wheel area.

Could it be a bent rotor?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Check your wheel bearings?
Have a friend stand in the middle of a parking lot; ride past him a few times. He may be able to help pinpoint it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,013 Posts
If you can’t hear it when on stands,you can still check your rotors for flatness and turn wheels slowly feeling for roughness or just a spot that feels different. That would probably be wheel bearings. Have the wheels been off the bike lately ? Check your chain, chain guards, and fenders for rubbing. Sometimes it’s a loose nut holding the throttle.😁
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the input so far guys.

Like ducati dad said there is no issues with braking power/feel so I think a warped rotor is out of the question.

Update:

I took out the pads and put the bike on the front stand. I spun the front wheel and I can hear a slight "low grinding" sound coming from the center hub. It's very faint but the faster you spin the wheel the louder it gets. I've never had any bearing issues with any vehicle of mine so I'm not sure if this noise is normal and I'm mistaking the bearing rolling around the axle as "grinding"....Or is it supposed to be completely silent?

If it's supposed to be silent...I think I found the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
There should never be an actual grinding sound with wheel bearings. Total silence is also unlikely (in my experience) you will probably hear the bearings as they move but it should be smooth sounding.

You might compare it to the rear wheel or another bike just to give it some perspective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,013 Posts
There should be NO noise or grinding coming from the hub. You need to tear into it. Good bearings would be totally silent and smooth. They are cheap, replace them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
So I ripped off the front tire again and this time checked to see how the bearings were spinning.

Well.... they weren't. Couldn't even get them to move.

I was curious to see what the insides looked like and immediately could tell the bearing seal had failed. Small gaps around the inner race. There was plenty of lube though but I could barely get the balls to spin pushing with a screwdriver. I guess this explains why I could only hear the noise at higher speeds. Pretty relieved to say the least.


Here's what I ordered last night from the information I researched on bearing removal and install.

Pit Posse Wheel Bearing Remover Tool Set.



Motion Pro Bearing Driver Set




Along with some All Balls bearings/seals.

Anything I should know about the removal or install? Is there a bearing I'm supposed to remove and install first?

From the looks of the removal tool....You find the right size "remover" and fit it snug inside the bearing from the outside, flip the entire wheel over, insert the rod tool through the hub and into the remover and pound it out. Then do the same for the other bearing.

The install: Place the spacer in the middle of the hub (Unless it stays put) with the notch on the axle nut side. And hammer in the bearings until seated. Then hammer in seals.

I believe I read some info on some hubs being different sizes at each end or bearings of different diameter? I'm not sure if that applies to Ducati or my bike so hoping someone can shed some lead on the entire process. Thank You
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,687 Posts
For removal, I use a drift or a flat screwdriver and tap the bearing out from the opposite side. You'll notice the internal spacer has a slot that gives access to the edge of the bearing, place the drift there and tap, rotate the spacer a bit, tap some more, keep rotating and tapping and it'll come right out. Of course, you can use your fancy bearing removal tool too! :wink2: For install, I'll use a socket or an old bearing race that will fit on the outside edge of the new bearing. Gently tap it into place making sure it goes in evenly. Keep tapping until it's seated. You'll know when the sound pitch changes. Don't forget to put the spacer back in when you install the second bearing!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top