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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi. Been going through a load of old bits and found that I have more than enough to put a scottoiler together.
Has anyone got any advice or pictures as where to fit the metering unit?
Thanks broadie
 

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Can't help you with the brand-name one. I made my own, since I didn't want any of the hadrware showing. It's in the HOW area. I placed "my" metering device on the LH side of frame, not too far from the 12V outlet on the newer ST's.
 

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Broadie:

How do you deal with the mess? Aren't the auto-oiling systems going to naturally be a messier solution than letting the chain lube dry to a tacky finish prior to riding?

Just curious!

M5driven....
 

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Hi. Been going through a load of old bits and found that I have more than enough to put a scottoiler together.
Has anyone got any advice or pictures as where to fit the metering unit?
Thanks broadie
Where ever you chose just try to keep the flow line from the reservoir to the outlet as short as possible.

If it is long then the oil builds up a gravity feed and then the amount of adjustment you have on the reservoir is very limited.

I installed one of the large reservoirs that are mounted behind the license plate and the flow line was about 48 inches long. I had only about 20-30 degrees of adjustment from full off to a big oily mess.

HTH.

M./
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Where ever you chose just try to keep the flow line from the reservoir to the outlet as short as possible.

If it is long then the oil builds up a gravity feed and then the amount of adjustment you have on the reservoir is very limited.

I installed one of the large reservoirs that are mounted behind the license plate and the flow line was about 48 inches long. I had only about 20-30 degrees of adjustment from full off to a big oily mess.

HTH.

M./
I was wondering about the extra suck of a twin. Have you tried the thicker red oil or possibly a restrictor in the vacuum line.

As for the oil on the wheel. Once setup right the scottoil is not stickie like the cans of chain lube or wax, it will wipe off the wheel with very little effort. Waterless wash and wax works very well. How ever I do degrease around the front sprocket once a year or on the oil service which ever comes sooner.
 

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I have mounted a few behind the left hand side cover,keeping in mind that you have to keep it as up right as you can, so on the st4 you can usually get it about 45degres which works fine. Then you only have to lift the seat to fill it.
As for the mess, if it's adjusted right there isn't much and like Broadie said very easy to clean up compared to chain lube.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Went for the visible option for a few reasons. 1 it's all odd bits that were kicking around so I like to see that it's working. ( also didn't have a lot of pipe). 2 I've got a lube tube somewhere that can go behind the side panel. 3 this seems like the best angle without making a bracket.
Running on setting 2 ( everything seems to run on setting 2) with a small amount of splatter on the wheel after 500 miles.
Cheers broadie
 

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So the benefit is a well-oiled chain, but does that extend chain life or sprocket life? Any studies of the difference?

Thank you!
 

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doubled my average chain life on the first bike i fitted it to, i have one on all my bikes now, i figure they pay for themselves pretty quickly. The other benefit of course is touring, especially if it's raining along the way.
 

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So the benefit is a well-oiled chain, but does that extend chain life or sprocket life? Any studies of the difference?

Thank you!
The main advantages to a Scotts are;

the chain does last quite a bit longer, at least twice as long and depending on various factors some have reported 3-4 times longer life. This would be for the chain *and* the sprockets.

the added friction of a dry chain consumes up to 10% of your rear wheel power vs. a lubricated chain.

removing the ongoing hassle-factor of constantly having to lube the chain is one of the bigger advantages. In order to keep it properly lubed, you do have to lube a chain every 200-300 miles and you have to do when it is hot and will not be ridden for a while. Otherwise, the lube does not have time to seep between the side-plates and set up and will just fling off.

even if you do lube a chain as often as you should the coagulating action of modern lubes cause them to gather grit and create a slurry that increases wear vs. the light oil film of the Scotts lube.

Hope the above helps, I have a Scotts on my bike and I am at about 2.5 times chain life vs. my original chain which I ran prior to installing the Scotts.

M./
 
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I was wondering about the extra suck of a twin. Have you tried the thicker red oil or possibly a restrictor in the vacuum line.
There is no extra suck with a big bike. The vacuum just raises a needle valve off its seat. The amount of clearance on the valve is determined by the adjuster knob on the top of the reservoir.

I did try the red oil but it really was the amount of line from the reservoir to the injector at the rear sprocket. I have a place inside my left side-cover pencilled in for the new location but have not moved it yet.

The large license plate type reservoir they offer is not a good way to go. Mine gave up the ghost a long time back (will not siphon from the large reservoir into the small) and I now have to refill the small reservoir on the metering system.

HTH.

M./
 
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