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Discussion Starter #1
About how many labor hours can one expect from a qualified Ducati Shop when putting a samco silicone tubing kit on my 2006 749s?
 

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About how many labor hours can one expect from a qualified Ducati Shop when putting a samco silicone tubing kit on my 2006 749s?
not sure how much they'll juice you for, but I'd expect at least an hour just to remove the fairing... which in reality takes about five minutes... taking your time and sipping a latte

It's not a difficult job. A knowlegable shadetree mechanic could do the job in less than two hours, but I'd estimate a dealership to get 3-4 hours to remove the fairing, drain coolant, replace hoses, refill/purge cooling system, replace fairing and road test.
 

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My shop charged me 1.5 hours for the DP hose kit on my 1098. That was with the fairings already off and me reinstalling them.
 

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Do it yourself and save the money.....it's easy to do! Plus you can clean the grim off the motor at the same time! Why pay a dealership 1.5 or 2.0 hours at $90/hour to do a job that you could do!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do it yourself and save the money.....it's easy to do! Plus you can clean the grim off the motor at the same time! Why pay a dealership 1.5 or 2.0 hours at $90/hour to do a job that you could do!!!!
Id prefer to do it myself. I am mechanically inclined however arent there several liquid systems that need to be drained etc? Im afraid I simply lack the experience however i certainly have the desire. If anyone would care to describe how or refer me to how-to vids or blogs I would prefer to do this myself. Its fun to take my bike apart!
 

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The only fluids you'll have to deal with is coolant. Did you get a kit that uses the OEM coolant manifold behind the battery box? If so:

1. Strip right and left fairings

2. Remove radiator cap; drain coolant by removing lower hose on radiator or drain plug on water pump (it has a copper wasr and looks differnt from the other bolts) If reusing coolant, be sure to use a use a clean container. If not, remember to drain the overflow tank on the right side air runner by spihon, or remove the runner to dump the contents

3. Remove old hoses, replace with pretty silicone hoses, not a bad idea to get new hose clamps and do not overtighten... it will cut into the silicone and cause a leak.

4. Refill coolant and purge the system just like a car. Putting the bike on it's sidestand makes the radiator filler neck the highest point in the system to get the most air out. Leave the cap off as you run the engine up to temp. You'll notice the coolant level drop significantly once the thermostat opens up. Let it run a bit with the cap off to let the air escape the system. Top off radiator, top off overflow tank.

5. Check for leaks, replace fairings, go for ride. Keep an eye on overflow tank level as air will continue to work it's way out over the next few rides, and be replaced with coolant from the tank as the bike cools.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So I wont get any leaky surprises with the other hoses? Dont the hoses all carry one form of liquid from point a to b? Pardon my ignorance I really have limited experience with engines despite loving to work on machines. I suppose I just though that that is what hoses do (transport liquids). If not then the coolant being my only challenge doesnt sound so bad at all....
Did I mention this is for a 749s?

Thank you for your enthusiastic and informative responses!!!


The only fluids you'll have to deal with is coolant. Did you get a kit that uses the OEM coolant manifold behind the battery box?

1. Strip right and left fairings

2. Remove radiator cap; drain coolant by removing lower hose on radiator or drain plug on water pump (it has a copper wasr and looks differnt from the other bolts) If reusing coolant, be sure to use a use a clean container. If not, remember to drain the overflow tank on the right side air runner by spihon, or remove the runner to dump the contents

3. Remove old hoses, replace with pretty silicone hoses, not a bad idea to get new hose clamps and do not overtighten... it will cut into the silicone and cause a leak.

4. Refill coolant and purge the system just like a car. Putting the bike on it's sidestand makes the radiator filler neck the highest point in the system to get the most air out. Leave the cap off as you run the engine up to temp. You'll notice the coolant level drop significantly once the thermostat opens up. Let it run a bit with the cap off to let the air escape the system. Top off radiator, top off overflow tank.

5. Check for leaks, replace fairings, go for ride. Keep an eye on overflow tank level as air will continue to work it's way out over the next few rides, and be replaced with coolant from the tank as the bike cools.
 

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Just dont' remove any banjo bolts or stainless lines, and you'll be good ;)

The biggest thing to watch for with silicone hoses is to not overtighten and cut into the hose. Good luck.

One note: I assumed you were familiar with working on your bike, so if not, I apologize if my instructions were simplistic. You will probably need to move the battery box out of the way to access some of the clamps... IIRC theres two 5mm bolts on the outside casing and one 4mm bolt behind the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just dont' remove any banjo bolts or stainless lines, and you'll be good ;)

The biggest thing to watch for with silicone hoses is to not overtighten and cut into the hose. Good luck.

One note: I assumed you were familiar with working on your bike, so if not, I apologize if my instructions were simplistic. You will probably need to move the battery box out of the way to access some of the clamps... IIRC theres two 5mm bolts on the outside casing and one 4mm bolt behind the battery.
Thanks for breaking that down a little more. No problem there! I think I can figure this out! If anyone thinks of any other tips kindly let me know! THANKS ALL
 

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Whoa! $145 for the hoses and another $50 for the clips- this from the Samco Site. Than 2hrs to put them in at $100/hr plus the coolant. Give me a friggin' break! They are hoses for crying out loud. Do it yourself for sure.

Anyone have a good source (price) for just the hoses?

Also, is it recommended to replace the thermostat while your at it. On cars that step is a no-brainer. Hard to get too? Oh, and let me guess, that DP thermostat is $120....more?
 

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I’m sorry for bringing up this old one, but I will get my Samco hose set next week and I would like to change the hoses my self. I need to be sure that I’m doing it the correct way. I understand step 1 to 5 what Matt, Bella, has given, but do I need to fill the radiator (top side has a decal "WARNING" on it) or the cooling fluid reservoir attached to the air tube?

I also would like to know the torque needed to add the Samco clamps to the Samco hoses. Or is it just hand tight?

Should I take care of something when I remove the complete battery unit? Just remove the 3 bolts and pull? It seems that all parts are tight together.

Thanks for the advice!

Dennie
 

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Before you start make sure your kit has ALL the necessary hoses... some of the kits don't include all the hoses (I found out the hard way) for some bizarre reason. I ended up having to piece together one run of hose from auto coolant hose and aluminum conduit! It has been working for 5yrs that way but kind of unsightly (fortunately hidden behind the fairing).
 

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I haven't used Samco brand but have on my ST4s another brand of silicone hose, but made to the same specs as the Samco, or so I was told.

First, do yourself a favor and get LT Snyder's new desmoquatro book: Ducati Desmoquattro Maintenance Guide You seem like you don't have much experience and this is the best beginner's bible, bar none. Think of all the money you'll save by not breaking so much stuff by following his directions. Yeh, you'll still break a few things, but not so much. :cool:

The battery, cables and other stuff all come out together. Keep them as a unit and simply move them out of the way. Covering them with plastic will be helpful, as you will get old coolant around, no matter how careful you are. Made slick with the coolant, it'll be a bugger to get back in - actually, it'll be a bugger to get back in no matter what, so be prepared for it.

Put in the hoses very gently. They're slick - hey, silicone! - so they should go in easy. If you need to, then lube with your coolant, which is a pretty good lube, even diluted. Don't use petroleum as a lube in the coolant system, please.

Tightening the clamps is also easy - as in, easy does it. Otherwise you may tear the hose, and perhaps the interior of the hose where you can't get to it. I put my hoses on in under 2 hours (drain, replace, refill).

My best experience in filling up Ducati radiators in such instances is to put all the hoses in except the one that attaches to the top of the radiator on the left side. Then fill up the system from that hose draining to the vertical cylinder, so that it goes down through the vertical cylinder rather than having to fight its way back up through the water pump. Told to do that by my mechanic and it worked like a charm - your mileage may vary. After you connected that final hose, then top off the radiator and then the coolant res.

The important part is to very gently hand tighten the clamps, really no more than slightly snug. Then turn the beastie on and tighten as necessary.

In my case, I simply tightened the clamps down to about 2 ft lbs. and waited for the leaks. None came. I buttoned it up and went for a ride.

Best of luck.
Ron
 

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I haven't used Samco brand but have on my ST4s another brand of silicone hose, but made to the same specs as the Samco, or so I was told.

First, do yourself a favor and get LT Snyder's new desmoquatro book: Ducati Desmoquattro Maintenance Guide You seem like you don't have much experience and this is the best beginner's bible, bar none. Think of all the money you'll save by not breaking so much stuff by following his directions. Yeh, you'll still break a few things, but not so much. :cool:

The battery, cables and other stuff all come out together. Keep them as a unit and simply move them out of the way. Covering them with plastic will be helpful, as you will get old coolant around, no matter how careful you are. Made slick with the coolant, it'll be a bugger to get back in - actually, it'll be a bugger to get back in no matter what, so be prepared for it.

Put in the hoses very gently. They're slick - hey, silicone! - so they should go in easy. If you need to, then lube with your coolant, which is a pretty good lube, even diluted. Don't use petroleum as a lube in the coolant system, please.

Tightening the clamps is also easy - as in, easy does it. Otherwise you may tear the hose, and perhaps the interior of the hose where you can't get to it. I put my hoses on in under 2 hours (drain, replace, refill).

My best experience in filling up Ducati radiators in such instances is to put all the hoses in except the one that attaches to the top of the radiator on the left side. Then fill up the system from that hose draining to the vertical cylinder, so that it goes down through the vertical cylinder rather than having to fight its way back up through the water pump. Told to do that by my mechanic and it worked like a charm - your mileage may vary. After you connected that final hose, then top off the radiator and then the coolant res.

The important part is to very gently hand tighten the clamps, really no more than slightly snug. Then turn the beastie on and tighten as necessary.

In my case, I simply tightened the clamps down to about 2 ft lbs. and waited for the leaks. None came. I buttoned it up and went for a ride.

Best of luck.
Ron
Thanks for your help Ron!!
 

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I just did the the Samco installation, it took about 2hrs. Theres no way i would pay someone do this. Easy job and looks nice. I went with red, even though blue seamed like the natural choice.:D
 

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I went with red, even though blue seamed like the natural choice.:D
I bought a red set too. Also a blue hose that matches the blue Corse water union and a thin white hose for the upper side of the water union. There is a 4 weeks production/ delivery time and I hope I will get them next week.
 

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I bought a red set too. Also a blue hose that matches the blue Corse water union and a thin white hose for the upper side of the water union. There is a 4 weeks production/ delivery time and I hope I will get them next week.
Never thought about a combination of colors. Thats gonna look sweet. Please post pics.
 

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The Samco hoses are on their way and should arrive next week. The cooling fluid should have corrode some parts of my bike. Can I use different cooling liquid that does not corrode parts of my bike? I do not use by bike in cold weather so can I use normal water?
 

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You need to use a Antifreeze regardless of your climate, as water alone does not have any of the lubricating properties of Antifreese.
 
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