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Discussion Starter #1
This bike is fast and I want to most from it's steering geometry and suspension damping. I do not see myself as a poser (although it is the coolest looking naked bike ever).

I see where guys have their suspension set-up for static and race sag, but no one talks numbers.

The initial stuff is easy to sequence thru; to measure and set. I'm not even talking about having my damping valving altered (yet). Nor the fluid height in the fork. I'm talking initial geomtries; static sag, race sag, link tuning, spring rates...

There has to be someone out there that can give starting numbers for the suspension sag for my Ohlins for this particular chassis and geometry.

It's not black magic where some guy charges me to take it in a backroom and do it, but give me sag numbers from experience of optimizing the steering throughout the suspension range and to optimize damping charcteristics if the shock is position sensitive. If the rear shock is position sensitive like my WP suspension on another bike, then its paramount to optimize damping operation in the full range of the shock.

So let's say the bike's rear sag (rear spring preload) is set (improperly) to drop real far in the stroke when I get on the bike, then the steering geometry is altered and the bike steers like a truck. I respond by extending my rear shock link to regain steering agility, but maybe the shock is still acting within its most compressed position and really isn't optimized for the correct damping characteristics. See what I'm saying?

My thoughts are to set the rear spring preload to have race sag (the amount of drop in the chassis when fully laden with suited up rider and full tank). Then set the front end. (I think the front spring rate might very well be inadequate and cause me to replace them with the next rate). Then set the rear link length to optimize high speed stability and the balance between under and over-steering when heeled over.

Maybe I don't understand any of it. But it's common to have a rule of thumb for sag settings on a dirtbike and it matters. I know it matters to guys going out on the track with their superbike. I've got to imagine its important for the Monster owner going out on the track, lest he find out the geometry isn't set up properly by crashing. Or at least wondering... He may be told he made a mistake, but maybe the suspension was not set-up for the right geometry and the frontend suddenly over or under-steered and pushed or tucked the frontend. I know I felt a huge difference between the link at its shortest value and now at it's longest setting.

I see the Monster forum filled with what mirrors and turn signals look coolest and that's great, but I also see some guys going out and having at it with their Monsters on the road and track. Have you set up the basics? Can you share the steps and values? How do I opitimize the handling on coolest bike I've owned?
 

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I have have same bike as you, and I weigh 195 loaded. I am sure yours will be a bit different, but here is how I have mine set up for the street.

Front end:

15 mm front static sag
30 mm front rider sag, total of 45 mm

I run the preload adjusters on the forks 4 turns out to get my sag numbers.

I run 16 clicks of compression, and 12 on rebound.

(I also tie wrapped the front tubes to check total usage of the forks)

Rear:

15 mm rear static sag
30 mm rear rider sag, again, total of 45

Ride height adjuster rod has 5 threads showing top and bottom.

I run 14 clicks of compression, and 12 rebound.

I have found that raising the rear too much causes the bike to turn better and faster, but it becomes unstable at higher speed, especially in traffic with wind turbulence caused by trucks, etc. (I also think some of this is caused by those big mirrors sticking out)

My setting have got the bike decent under all conditions for my riding style. It is a bit on the soft side, but the roads around here are not the best and I really don't race around town that much. I also took the front fairing off, the wind got blown right under my chin and was annoying as hell. I actually seems to help the bike handle better at highway speed without it IMO.

Good luck with your bike!
 

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My thoughts are to set the rear spring preload to have race sag (the amount of drop in the chassis when fully laden with suited up rider and full tank). Then set the rear link length to optimize high speed stability and the balance between under and over-steering when heeled over.
You may have to fine-tune both of them (spring preload & ride height adjuster) back and forth a few times as one adjustment may alter the other. For example you may have the shock sag correct but when you then raise the rear ride height with the threaded rod it will transfer your body weight forward onto the forks and at that point you will no longer have enough sag on the rear shock.
 

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Start by dropping the triple down the fork tube ~10-15mm or ~ 2-3 bands showing. Increase rear link a turn or two and install a damper. This will make it turn in much easier and not stand up as easily when breaking or powering out of corners. The damper will stabilize the steering under "light" conditions because the head tube geometey is less slack now. Put a zip tie on one fork leg and go for a spirited ride laying off hard straight line braking. Adjust front shock preload to allow 1/2" - 1" bottoming clearance. This ought to get you started, the other adjustments are simply refinements from this starting point and dont expect them to make major changes in feel.
 

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Around these parts, if you go to some track days, there is a guy there named Dave Moss that will help you set your bike up for you, and although I've never used him personally, a whole bunch of guys that I know have, and according to them, he is THE guy to set up you suspension. I realize that that isn't what you are asking, but It's as close as I can get.

I don't know about the midwest where you are at, but professional setup make a world of difference.

You might try calling or emailing him, his company is Catalyst Suspension, or something close to that.
 

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i can vouch for Dave Moss...he helped me set up my 2007 S4RS for street riding...haven't tried to run the bike at the track however. would love to hear how it handles on track...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for your thoughtful replies.

Steve600, I appreciate the details and sequence. I weigh within 5 lbs. with gear. Your descriptions make sense as does the sequence. I will give it a go. I like the looks of the fairing, but useless doesn't best describe it! I suspect the mirrors also, but I'm considering the alternatives and mounting bar-end types, albeit smaller, are moved further out on the lever that steers the bike. Besides, glancing further to the periphery of my forward field of view makes a difference to me in a traffic situation. These things blur when the engine is running, so finding a clear alternative is high on the list. All things tuned for functionality first, then form.

Thanks again.
 
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