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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone knows if the 998RS camshafts will fit and work in a 998R?
Will it give any performance improvements?
Thanks
 

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The RS cam's are really designed for capturing that extra top end, and at a price too; they do it between 12k and 14k RPM. To make them work properly, you'll need the over-sized airbox, proper length trumpets, RS spec timing, matching exhaust, higher-flow fuel injectors, RS fuel regulator and some ECU to control the whole thing. Of course, you're still missing the high comp pistons on that 998R... But if you were to do it all, you'd pretty much gain 25-30 RWHP at 14k RPM.

The RS cam openers have a serious shelf on them, which destroys rockers and half rings. This is why Ducati uses a totally different system on the corse bikes. So your maintenance costs immediately increase with that and the higher RPM's.

BUT!!!!

You can toss those cams in your motor, have them timed more for lower-RPM running and maybe get 5rwhp out of them. There are gains to be made, but they are very marginal without the entire RS package to back them up.



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Discussion Starter #3
The RS cam's are really designed for capturing that extra top end, and at a price too; they do it between 12k and 14k RPM. To make them work properly, you'll need the over-sized airbox, proper length trumpets, RS spec timing, matching exhaust, higher-flow fuel injectors, RS fuel regulator and some ECU to control the whole thing. Of course, you're still missing the high comp pistons on that 998R... But if you were to do it all, you'd pretty much gain 25-30 RWHP at 14k RPM.

The RS cam openers have a serious shelf on them, which destroys rockers and half rings. This is why Ducati uses a totally different system on the corse bikes. So your maintenance costs immediately increase with that and the higher RPM's.

BUT!!!!

You can toss those cams in your motor, have them timed more for lower-RPM running and maybe get 5rwhp out of them. There are gains to be made, but they are very marginal without the entire RS package to back them up.
Don´t worth that such big investment... for ME...
But thanks for the answer...

And what do you think about the 998RS Flywheel into the 998R ???
 

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Very often swapping one stock part for an RS part forces you to swap two more parts in order to make the first fit. A single RS part here and there most likely won't make much of a difference because all RS parts work together as a system and you cannot expect to get the performance gain you're after unless you go all the way and that's going to be <understatement>very expensive</understatement>.

If you really want to lighten your flywheel I'd recommend a Nichols flywheel. Works great. No fuss.
And what do you think about the 998RS Flywheel into the 998R ???
 

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Yep, you're right, 12,500 is about right for the F02, I must have been thinking about the later model 999RS. I know Troy Bayliss frequently hit 14k and didn't use a rev limiter in the later years since they had to re-build them every race anyhow.

The 749RS runs at 13,500, with re-builds every 700km. I know guys who've run entire seasons off one motor though.

And what do you think about the 998RS Flywheel into the 998R ???
Its pretty dam light, it might be worth something, but then again, the 998R already has a pretty light flywheel. You're not gonna see much gain, just a quicker spooling motor. The biggest change will be in the RS crank shaft, if you want quicker spooling.



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A big change indeed; but not neccesarily for the better :D

The 998RS is a 998 cc engine (100 mm bore x 63.5 mm stroke) whereas the 998R is a 999 cc engine (104 mm bore x 58.8 mm stroke) so as far as I know you cannot install a 998RS crank into a 998R engine.

As a matter of fact, I'd advise against installing RS parts unless you know what you're getting into. It's going to cost you a lot of money with deminishing returns power and reliability wise...
The biggest change will be in the RS crank shaft, if you want quicker spooling.
 

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Yes, the 998R has the 999 cc engine whereas the 998RS doesn't.

The 998RS first came out in 2002 and as is normal with the RS bikes, it inherited the factory engine from the previous year (998F01).

If you compare the road and race bikes from that era the 996R corresponds to the 998F01 (both bikes having 998 cc engines with 100 mm bore x 63.5 mm stroke) whereas the 998R corresponds to the 998F02 (both bikes were equipped with 999 cc engines with 104 mm bore x 58.8 mm stroke).

In 2001 the Ducati customer bikes in WorldSBK were 996 machines. The factory team used the 998F01 (the first of the Testastretta engines).

In 2002 the 998RS became available to the privateers but at this stage the factory team started using the shorter stroke, higher revving 999 cc Testastretta engines in their factory bikes (998F02).
Ohh, the 998R wasn't a 999cc machine? Dam, I thought they did that just on the R model.
 

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You might want to consider Ducati's service schedule before fitting many RS parts?

Taken from GTEC Performance (Ducati service specialist) website; http://www.gtecperformance.co.uk

A brief list of items recommended by Ducati to change on the older 998RS02 at 500kms (that’s 500, not 5000)

•Opening rocker arms
•Closing rocker arms
•Big-end shells (Rods are changed at 4000kms)
•Crank-cases
•Cylinders & Pistons
•Cam-belts
•Clutch plates
•Oil and filter
•Valves
 

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Yes, the 998R has the 999 cc engine whereas the 998RS doesn't.

The 998RS first came out in 2002 and as is normal with the RS bikes, it inherited the factory engine from the previous year (998F01).

If you compare the road and race bikes from that era the 996R corresponds to the 998F01 (both bikes having 998 cc engines with 100 mm bore x 63.5 mm stroke) whereas the 998R corresponds to the 998F02 (both bikes were equipped with 999 cc engines with 104 mm bore x 58.8 mm stroke).

In 2001 the Ducati customer bikes in WorldSBK were 996 machines. The factory team used the 998F01 (the first of the Testastretta engines).

In 2002 the 998RS became available to the privateers but at this stage the factory team started using the shorter stroke, higher revving 999 cc Testastretta engines in their factory bikes (998F02).
I was referring to F01/F02 not RS... sorry. The RS bikes in that era were 1/2 desmoquattro's and 1/2 testastretta's, it was a messy period of time in Ducati racing.

Thanks for the info though, glad to see someone knows their facts! :D



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