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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So last night I took my new 848 out for a 25-27 ride and on the way back home I managed to over rev it to 6800-7000 RPM for a split second. Now with the owner’smanual strictly saying it shouldn’t go above 5500-6000 during the first 600 miles (1000 km), do you think that could have caused a problem? When I got home and parked my bike in my garage I noticed my yellow engine light was on. In a panic I turned the bike on a few more times hoping the light would go away but it still lit up. After the 3rd time I turned the key to ignition (without starting the engine), I waited 5 minutes and then the yellow engine light disappeared. It hasn’t come back but how weird is that? Should I be alarmed?
 

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Old Wizard
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Engine Break-In

Don’t worry, your engine is OK.

Every Ducati engine is run-in for ten minutes or more on the dyno using a prescribed rpm and temperature sequence. The piston rings seal is mostly complete after this initial test run. The follow-up part of the break-in that you read in your Owners Manual has little to do with piston ring sealing. It’s meant to accommodate the time it takes for normal wear to occur to thousands of mating parts.

The 600 mile break-in period is actually the final finishing step in manufacturing an engine. At the factory, Ducati hones the cylinder walls to a fine finish, grinds cams to accurate, smooth profiles, and makes connecting rod journals to high standards of roundness and accuracy. But, metal surfaces are still microscopically rough, consisting of tiny peaks and valleys. When you start a new engine, these surfaces must slide over each other and wherever the peaks stick up higher than the local oil film thickness, metal hits metal, welds momentarily from the intense local pressure, and then tears away. The oil flushes away these bits of metal, and the oil filter removes them from circulation.

This process works quickly at first, then more slowly as break-in proceeds. Once the high spots are knocked or pushed down, the roughness of the surfaces no longer sticks above the oil films. Piston rings have filed themselves into a fine fit to their cylinders. Bearings spin without metal-to-metal contact, on full oil films. Break-in is complete in 600 miles.

If you decide to ignore Ducati’s recommendation that engine rpm be limited for the break-in period and instead you run at high RPM and heavy throttle, the wear process may generate more heat and metal debris than the system can handle. Then the result is destruction of contact surfaces in some parts of the engine.

If you use Ducati’s break-in method and gradually build up to higher revs and throttle, the washing action of the oil will keep up with the generation of wear particles, and the surfaces will bed into each other in such a way that the oil film can carry the load.

Finally, the 600 mile period of moderate operation needs to be followed by some hard acceleration and trips to the red line. Sustained, high-speed operation is not a good idea because it provides no wash time at low load, during which the oil system can flush away any wear particles.

So take the above advice and (after 600 miles) ride it like you stole it.
 

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Don’t worry, your engine is OK.

Every Ducati engine is run-in for ten minutes or more on the dyno using a prescribed rpm and temperature sequence. The piston rings seal is mostly complete after this initial test run. The follow-up part of the break-in that you read in your Owners Manual has little to do with piston ring sealing. It’s meant to accommodate the time it takes for normal wear to occur to thousands of mating parts.

The 600 mile break-in period is actually the final finishing step in manufacturing an engine. At the factory, Ducati hones the cylinder walls to a fine finish, grinds cams to accurate, smooth profiles, and makes connecting rod journals to high standards of roundness and accuracy. But, metal surfaces are still microscopically rough, consisting of tiny peaks and valleys. When you start a new engine, these surfaces must slide over each other and wherever the peaks stick up higher than the local oil film thickness, metal hits metal, welds momentarily from the intense local pressure, and then tears away. The oil flushes away these bits of metal, and the oil filter removes them from circulation.

This process works quickly at first, then more slowly as break-in proceeds. Once the high spots are knocked or pushed down, the roughness of the surfaces no longer sticks above the oil films. Piston rings have filed themselves into a fine fit to their cylinders. Bearings spin without metal-to-metal contact, on full oil films. Break-in is complete in 600 miles.

If you decide to ignore Ducati’s recommendation that engine rpm be limited for the break-in period and instead you run at high RPM and heavy throttle, the wear process may generate more heat and metal debris than the system can handle. Then the result is destruction of contact surfaces in some parts of the engine.

If you use Ducati’s break-in method and gradually build up to higher revs and throttle, the washing action of the oil will keep up with the generation of wear particles, and the surfaces will bed into each other in such a way that the oil film can carry the load.

Finally, the 600 mile period of moderate operation needs to be followed by some hard acceleration and trips to the red line. Sustained, high-speed operation is not a good idea because it provides no wash time at low load, during which the oil system can flush away any wear particles.

So take the above advice and (after 600 miles) ride it like you stole it.

Great post!
 

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I second that. Phenomenal info Shazaam.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don’t worry, your engine is OK.

Every Ducati engine is run-in for ten minutes or more on the dyno using a prescribed rpm and temperature sequence. The piston rings seal is mostly complete after this initial test run. The follow-up part of the break-in that you read in your Owners Manual has little to do with piston ring sealing. It’s meant to accommodate the time it takes for normal wear to occur to thousands of mating parts.

The 600 mile break-in period is actually the final finishing step in manufacturing an engine. At the factory, Ducati hones the cylinder walls to a fine finish, grinds cams to accurate, smooth profiles, and makes connecting rod journals to high standards of roundness and accuracy. But, metal surfaces are still microscopically rough, consisting of tiny peaks and valleys. When you start a new engine, these surfaces must slide over each other and wherever the peaks stick up higher than the local oil film thickness, metal hits metal, welds momentarily from the intense local pressure, and then tears away. The oil flushes away these bits of metal, and the oil filter removes them from circulation.

This process works quickly at first, then more slowly as break-in proceeds. Once the high spots are knocked or pushed down, the roughness of the surfaces no longer sticks above the oil films. Piston rings have filed themselves into a fine fit to their cylinders. Bearings spin without metal-to-metal contact, on full oil films. Break-in is complete in 600 miles.

If you decide to ignore Ducati’s recommendation that engine rpm be limited for the break-in period and instead you run at high RPM and heavy throttle, the wear process may generate more heat and metal debris than the system can handle. Then the result is destruction of contact surfaces in some parts of the engine.

If you use Ducati’s break-in method and gradually build up to higher revs and throttle, the washing action of the oil will keep up with the generation of wear particles, and the surfaces will bed into each other in such a way that the oil film can carry the load.

Finally, the 600 mile period of moderate operation needs to be followed by some hard acceleration and trips to the red line. Sustained, high-speed operation is not a good idea because it provides no wash time at low load, during which the oil system can flush away any wear particles.

So take the above advice and (after 600 miles) ride it like you stole it.
Awesome post and thank for all that detailed information! I’ve just been taking my 848 on roads and not getting above 65 MPH or really ever 5000-5200 RPM. My acceleration hasn’t been faster than the other vehicles on the road. My typical cruising RPM is 3400-4200 RPM. Would you say I’m safe? :)
 

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I wonder why the engine light came on. Weird. Probably nothing though. Just might want to let the mechanics know what happened when you service it at 600 miles.
 

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Hammer Down
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So take the above advice and (after 600 miles) ride it like you stole it.
So you don't think the extended break in procedure outline in the user manual for another 1500 kms is necessary? In the manual for the 848 it says to not exceed 7k RPMs 1000 kms to 2500 kms.
 

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Old Wizard
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So you don't think the extended break in procedure outline in the user manual for another 1500 kms is necessary? In the manual for the 848 it says to not exceed 7k RPMs 1000 kms to 2500 kms.
For the reasons stated above, I consider it much more important to avoid running at a constant 7,000 rpm than an occasional excursion above 7,000 rpm.
 

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So you don't think the extended break in procedure outline in the user manual for another 1500 kms is necessary? In the manual for the 848 it says to not exceed 7k RPMs 1000 kms to 2500 kms.
The Ducati salesmen that sold me my bike (SF848) also mentioned to ignore the second break in period and give it a few hard runs. Just nothing to sustained like a 7000rpm holding. He's been racing and riding over 15 Ducatis in 10 years. I trust him, and he pretty much said the exact same :)
 

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The Ducati salesmen that sold me my bike (SF848) also mentioned to ignore the second break in period and give it a few hard runs. Just nothing to sustained like a 7000rpm holding. He's been racing and riding over 15 Ducatis in 10 years. I trust him, and he pretty much said the exact same :)
I specifically asked my dealership about the two step run in for my SF 848 (because I'd been told to abide by it when I had an 848 SB), and they said it was OK to give it a good rev, once you get past the first 1000 km. THEN I read the manual and its advice that I'd void warranty by not following the second stage run in procedure. Sigh. :confused:

I think I'll largely stick to the 7k limit till 2500 km, but I won't panic if I do go over.

Tony F
 
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