Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought a 1997 900SS and am reviving it after 7 years of sitting in a garage. I have replaced the battery, Changed the oil, replaced the fluid in the brakes and gave it a quick once over. The Clutch is flat...does nothing when you squeeze the handle. I tried to change the fluid and bleed it but still nothing. I decided to fire it up after draining all the fuel and filling it with new fuel. It will fire for a couple seconds with the choke on fully but will not stay running. Where do I start? How tough is it to rebuild the carbs? Could the brake master cylinder have went bad from sitting? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks, Rick.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
Hi Rick,

Just rebuilt my carbs - will add some pics tomorrow (10pm here, off to bed :) ), they are very easy to work on!

The clutch slave cylinder seal's go for a pastime - would recommend a new seal & also new belts before she starts up. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
very nice looking bike; the rack on the rear seat unit is an interesting touch too, but I think you'll find it's not a '97 (manufactured) model as there isn't an oil temp gauge or underslung rear brake caliper, more likely to be a '95.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You are right. I bought the bike with the previous owner stating it was a 1997. The year it was built was 95 but first sold in 97. I discovered this last night. The rack is interesting isn't it......that was the only thing I don't like about the bike. I am going to talk to a friend of mine to see how much to cover the holes and repaint the tail section.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
very nice looking bike; the rack on the rear seat unit is an interesting touch too, but I think you'll find it's not a '97 (manufactured) model as there isn't an oil temp gauge or underslung rear brake caliper, more likely to be a '95.
My '95 has the temp guage & underslung caliper, yours may even be a '94?


Right - carbs!

Remove your seat & hinge the tank up, plenty of room to work without removing it? Turn the fuel off by twisting the tap clockwise, undo the jubilee clip on the "Y" hose junction & pull off the petrol hose going to the carbs, catching any excess fuel with rags etc.

Remove your battery, undo the two allen bolts holding the coil/ignitor rail onto the airbox & move the rail back towards the tail... remove the large fuse on the side of the airbox & the starter solenoid from underneath?

Towards the front of the underside of the airbox there are two 8mm bolts, one either side - bit fiddly to get to! I have a large sofa cushion I use to lie on top of to access difficult bits like this, also saves my knees kneeling. :D Remove the two drain tubes on the carb float bowls whilst you are there...

Two more 8mm bolts either side of the battery box, remove the airbox lid & filter, fitting small pieces of rag/paper towel into the gap under the slides to stop you dropping things into the carbs/intake tubes... :rolleyes:

Remove the tank clamp bracket from behind the headstock - you should be able to remove the airbox without undoing the jubilee clips clamping the rubbers onto the top of the carbs? Pull it off - it will need a wiggle to get it out? This should leave you with this...





Undo the clips clamping the carbs to the intake trumpets, remove the choke cable from the top of the carbs, also remove the two large tubes from either carb to the square black plastic box.

Wiggle the carbs from the intake rubbers - stuff rags/towel down the intake tubes to stop you posting anything - there is a throttle cable bracket bolted to one of the float bowls, loosen & undo the two throttle cables by loosening the two 10mm nuts on each cable.



Underside of the carbs - the big bolts in the middle of the bowls are where the carb heater hoses fit - there are four posidrive/crosshead screws holding the bowls on, these are made of cheese and will probably have been chewed up by a previous owner like mine were... use an impact driver to remove any stubborn ones - I replaced mine with stainless M5 x 12mm allen bolts - the two holding the cable bracket on are M5 x 14mm, M5 x 16mm bolts will fit fine!

Drain the remaining fuel out of the carbs using the drain screws (top right of the bowls), roll the carb around to ensure it is all out, this will stop you tipping fuel down yourself when you pop the bowls off...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
Float bowls off - the floats can be pulled out of the carbs, being held in by an o-ring seal at the bottom left of the carb? Be careful not to lose the small pin assembly holding the shutoff valve in.


Floats removed - there is a 6mm nut & spacer (removed in photo) holding the jet holder assembly in place, once removed the jet holder will slide off the emulsion tube base.







Two screws hold the diaphragm cover on - be careful not to lose the tiny o-ring on the left of the photo, also be careful not to tip the diaphragm/needle assembly upside down, the needle & spacers will slide out!



Diaphragm, slide & needle removed, showing the slide guide.



The emulsion tube is visible through the slide hole, is a tight fit in the carb base but can be carefully pushed through? The hole in the middle will enlarge/ovalise in time giving you too rich /incorrect carburation?



That should be a help! Couldnt find any carb pics before I stripped mine bar the black & white ones in my Haynes??

Good luck, young Jedi. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
P.s.

You will need new gaskets for the float bowl, jet holder & new o-rings for the carb top & floats?

Will list part numbers asap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
13440031A - float bowl gasket

13440111A - jet holder gasket

13240041A - emulsion tube

78910011A - float o-ring

13440081A - carb top tiny o-ring (2off)

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,434 Posts
2 things. 1. Don't even start it again without replacing the cam belts. 2 years is the recommended replacement interval. 4 years is pushing it, but after 7, it is Russian Roulette! If they break, bad things will happen to the valves and probably the pistons. 2. You might try bleeding the clutch at the master cylinder. Even if the piston seals in the slave are toast, you should still have a clutch action as long as there is fluid in the system. Most people only bleed the slave, but the master is the high point in the system and air bubbles can collect there. I had to remove my clutch hose when I replaced the frame on my track bike, and after refilling and bleeding the system, I had no clutch at all until I bled the master (wrap a rag around it to keep the brake fluid off the paint, and bleed it be cracking open the banjo bolt). Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
470four said:
That should be a help! Couldnt find any carb pics before I stripped mine bar the black & white ones in my Haynes??

Good luck, young Jedi. :D
Wow! Great write up, Four! Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
WoW! This should be a sticky!! Thank you for such in depth info. I will be tackling the carbs this weekend. I am very impressed four!! You rock!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
WoW! This should be a sticky!! Thank you for such in depth info. I will be tackling the carbs this weekend. I am very impressed four!! You rock!!
No prob! :yeah:

Just edited said post, also have some points to add:

DON'T strip your carbs down & lay all the bits out on a filthy workbench etc, any tiny piece of dirt on your carbs will make your bike run like a pig - keep things clean! An old eggbox or similar is great for keeping fiddly bits seperate.

On reassembly when you tighten the 6mm jet holder nut the emulsion tube will skew slightly - it is held in line by the groove along its side & a nubbin in the jet holder, but this will not stop it turning slightly? Look through the slide guide & undo the nut a tiny bit, this wont actually loosen the nut but will *poik* the tube back where it should be. :)

Your carbs will be full of seven-year old fuel. I rescued a CBR6 from its six-year garage hibernation & the fuel that was in the tank was - I kid you not - neon green & fkn STANK! I left the tap & cap off for it to vent a while but had to move the tank from the garage to the shed as the fumes gave me a headache...

Here are the emulsion tubes...







(akkkkk) :eek: Ikky! No brake or carb cleaner would touch this crap - in the end I LIGHTLY blowtorched them, all the gak turned to ash & brushed off real easy! ;) Get the worst of the crap off by scraping it with a brass scraper - or a screwdriver with the corners rounded?

Do NOT under any circumstance use wire or similar to clear carb jets or passageways, this can cause widening of said orifice & poor running?

NO EXCUSES!


(If you do, then guitar strings come in many sizes & are perfect, providing you are careful. The wires on a wire brush are also handy. :D)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
Re: clutch problems - get yourself a 60ml syringe (eBay etc?) and a short piece of suitable hose - wire twist the hose onto the syringe nose to secure it, draw up a syringe-full of brake fluid!

With the master cylinder lid off, slide the ring-end of an 8mm spanner onto the hose on the syringe.

Push the fluid all the way to the end of the hose to ensure no air gets pushed in and pop it onto the slave bleed nipple. Twist some wire around the hose to keep it from popping off under pressure, slide the spanner down onto the nipple & crack it open a quarter-turn.

Push the fluid out of the syringe through the hose back up through the slave, clutch hose & master cylinder, pushing any air out with it!

Air rises naturally, most bleeding operations try to push bubbles down the hose & out the other end, not easy! Pushing the fluid back up the other way is a much more natural way to *BURP* any bubbles up and out - real good way to fill new brake hoses etc. ;)
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top