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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does the reservoir size for break and clutch matter? looking at some rizoma's they have small medium and large would prefer the 2 small versions but not sure if thats appropriate ..

Thanks for the input\



Also does anyone have experience with CRG ( gold color ) does it match up to the Rizoma Gold color... Trying to keep the same version of gold across all components, but like CRG levers better...
 

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Here's Brembo's guidance regarding brake fluid reservoirs from their High Performance Brake Systems Catalog.

http://www.brembo.com/en/bike/Racing/Racing/Documents/Pompe-Catalogo.pdf

2.1. Choice of the reservoir

The capacity of the reservoir must be such that when the brake fluid is between the MIN and MAX levels (with the cover in a horizontal position) the volume is at least equal to that required by the brake pistons in case of maximum pad and rotor wear.


Questions regarding the size and location of the hydraulic fluid reservoirs come up from time-to-time, so lets take a moment to address some safety concerns regarding modifications to the clutch and brake actuation circuits.

To some owners, the hardware and its placement is considered to be quite unsightly so they have taken various approaches to replacing the mounting brackets and tanks with more attractive items and relocating them to less obtrusive locations on the bike. The Rizoma billet reservoir tanks, for example, are a popular replacement item but introduce another concern, as you will later see.

The first question that comes up is whether a smaller-than-stock replacement reservoir can be used given that the size of the stock reservoir design is based on the need to always maintain an adequate fluid level.

Clutch Reservoir. The stock clutch reservoir is designed hold a volume sufficient to accommodate the fluid displaced by the slave cylinder when the clutch plates wear over their service lifetime. However, clutch plate wear is a slow process so a smaller reservoir, checked for excessive level more often, would also seem to work. Also note that the volume of clutch fluid displaced over time is quite small yet the stock clutch reservoir is relatively quite large.

Brake Reservoir. The brake reservoir is designed to be larger because the volume of fluid displaced by the caliper pistons is larger than the clutch slave piston. But again, a smaller reservoir (with the fluid checked and replenished more often) would work just as well.

So how much reservoir volume do you actually need to maintain brake and clutch function in the short term?—perhaps a thimble full. As others have pointed out, a short section of clear tubing attached to the master cylinder holds enough fluid to accommodate normal wear experienced during a day at the track.

That said, my recommendation is, for safety reasons, to leave the stock design and components in place or be careful about which aftermarket units you buy. What’s my concern?

LEAKS

Keep in mind that motorcycle master cylinders, unlike automobiles, have no redundancy. That is, there is no separate second piston and reservoir, so if you loose fluid you loose braking or clutch actuation.

The reason that the stock reservoirs are translucent plastic and placed up near the instrument gauges (ugly, up and in your face, say some riders) is that they allow you to periodically scan for rapid changes in fluid level and consequently to avoid impending catastrophic brake loss while you’re riding.

Checking reservoir fluid level is part of your pre-flight checklist so if you’ve tucked them away or replaced them with billet units with tiny windows that don’t’ allow you to see level changes at a glance you’re depriving yourself of important safety information. Out of sight, out of mind.

Automobiles use a low brake fluid level dashboard indicator light to give an alert, but on a Ducati you need to use the computerized warning circuit between your ears.

There is one aftermarket reservoir that addresses these concerns—the CT125 "Next" reservoirs made by Rizoma. The units are more attractive than stock plastic and have large viewing windows to allow seeing trends in fluid level before it's too late.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the reply vary informative...




Here's Brembo's guidance regarding brake fluid reservoirs from their High Performance Brake Systems Catalog.

http://www.brembo.com/en/bike/Racing/Racing/Documents/Pompe-Catalogo.pdf

2.1. Choice of the reservoir

The capacity of the reservoir must be such that when the brake fluid is between the MIN and MAX levels (with the cover in a horizontal position) the volume is at least equal to that required by the brake pistons in case of maximum pad and rotor wear.


Questions regarding the size and location of the hydraulic fluid reservoirs come up from time-to-time, so lets take a moment to address some safety concerns regarding modifications to the clutch and brake actuation circuits.

To some owners, the hardware and its placement is considered to be quite unsightly so they have taken various approaches to replacing the mounting brackets and tanks with more attractive items and relocating them to less obtrusive locations on the bike. The Rizoma billet reservoir tanks, for example, are a popular replacement item but introduce another concern, as you will later see.

The first question that comes up is whether a smaller-than-stock replacement reservoir can be used given that the size of the stock reservoir design is based on the need to always maintain an adequate fluid level.

Clutch Reservoir. The stock clutch reservoir is designed hold a volume sufficient to accommodate the fluid displaced by the slave cylinder when the clutch plates wear over their service lifetime. However, clutch plate wear is a slow process so a smaller reservoir, checked for excessive level more often, would also seem to work. Also note that the volume of clutch fluid displaced over time is quite small yet the stock clutch reservoir is relatively quite large.

Brake Reservoir. The brake reservoir is designed to be larger because the volume of fluid displaced by the caliper pistons is larger than the clutch slave piston. But again, a smaller reservoir (with the fluid checked and replenished more often) would work just as well.

So how much reservoir volume do you actually need to maintain brake and clutch function in the short term?—perhaps a thimble full. As others have pointed out, a short section of clear tubing attached to the master cylinder holds enough fluid to accommodate normal wear experienced during a day at the track.

That said, my recommendation is, for safety reasons, to leave the stock design and components in place or be careful about which aftermarket units you buy. What’s my concern?

LEAKS

Keep in mind that motorcycle master cylinders, unlike automobiles, have no redundancy. That is, there is no separate second piston and reservoir, so if you loose fluid you loose braking or clutch actuation.

The reason that the stock reservoirs are translucent plastic and placed up near the instrument gauges (ugly, up and in your face, say some riders) is that they allow you to periodically scan for rapid changes in fluid level and consequently to avoid impending catastrophic brake loss while you’re riding.

Checking reservoir fluid level is part of your pre-flight checklist so if you’ve tucked them away or replaced them with billet units with tiny windows that don’t’ allow you to see level changes at a glance you’re depriving yourself of important safety information. Out of sight, out of mind.

Automobiles use a low brake fluid level dashboard indicator light to give an alert, but on a Ducati you need to use the computerized warning circuit between your ears.

There is one aftermarket reservoir that addresses these concerns—the CT125 "Next" reservoirs made by Rizoma. The units are more attractive than stock plastic and have large viewing windows to allow seeing trends in fluid level before it's too late.
 
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