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Hello,

Found a 2000 M750 for $1945. Here is the link: https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb/mcy/5448086794.html I'm wondering if anyone who owns the bike can chime in on any known issues with this model, things to look out for when I go to inspect it, etc. I've requested to have the bike inspected by a Ducati mechanic near me, I'm hoping he is willing. Other than that, it will be my first Duc, been on a 250 for 3 years and ~50k miles. Let me know what you guys think!

For those that can't view Craigslist, here is the text:


2000 Ducati
750 Monster

Engine starts right up. Sounds like a beast. Clean Title. This was an Exclusive anniversary edition model. The current paint is a plastic camo dip that can be easily be peeled off. Headlights, Brake lights, and Turning signals all functional. Tires/Tread is about 50-60%. Mileage 17,434k and counting. Illuminated Tachometer is aftermarket and came assembled when I purchased the bike including the Steering wheel dampner.

Received Tune-up service end of summer 2015.
Valves adjusted at 14,000 mi
spark plugs replaced
oil change

Brand New Headlamp
Brand New battery just replaced in Dec. 2015
Recently replaced the rear brakes w/ original Ducati name brand Brembo pads.
I have the pink slip/ bike manual/ service receipts/ and also the wiring schematics as a pdf file.
Tags are updated and are good till next year October 2016.

Currently NEEDS a brand new chain and front sprocket. I advised that it be replaced before you take a lengthy ride. I currently have a brand new kit reserved at a dealer for around $250.
The bike definitely needs work and can use a owner who can provide much needed attention!

Things that also need attention:
The rubber gasket in the gas tanks needs to be replaced, its worn but still holds.
There is a small hole in the exhaust pipe that causes backfire from time to time.
The original paint underneath is still intact but might need a little touch-up.
Eventually needs a new full wiring harness for the electrical system ($60-70 online),
to keep the bike electrically sound for the long haul.

This bike has been maintained using the following:
Premium Gas Only
Fully synthetic 10-40 oil
Recommend new buyer to continue this upkeep​




 

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m750's are great bikes.
I am a big fan of the 750 motor in general as they will take a beating and keep going. Things to watch for is maintenance and abuse. the bike has gsxr forks if I am not mistaken which if done right is a plus. I cannot see the fork tube well but it seems black for some reason (fork oil leak?) If you are looking for a decent starter duc I don't think you will go wrong as long as it is not a pile from abuse and neglect. Yes have the local shop take a peek at it and get a better idea (valley desmo service?).

750 had little if any real issues some of that era had oil leaks at the vertical cylinder base gasket (by the breather). A few had over preloaded crankshafts. Thats all I can think of, I would not pass up a good one. I get to ride them all on test rides, a 750 is still a favorite to this day.
 

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the forks are from a different bike as are the brakes, combine that with a new headlight and it sounds like the whole front end of the bike has been replaced, so its probably been down. thats not a bad thing if it was put together well. mechanically these are very solid bikes, timing belts and fresh oil service records would be my main concern. I didnt see anything about it having a new battery, might be worth asking about. A bike this old is always going to need something, but the price is good
 

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I didn't see anything about the cam timing belts. If there is no record of them being changed I wouldn't ride the bike until they are checked and replaced. A couple of dinged valves will cost you almost as much as the bike.
Otherwise, I agree with the others, solid bike and a fair price.
Jump into the Ducati pool!!
 

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Here's a good place to check sprocket and chain prices. Will probably be a lot cheaper than a dealer and a pretty simple project to start building your Ducati skills and tools.

Sprocket Center
 

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This was an Exclusive anniversary edition model
I was at the dealership then and do not remember any such model of 750 , could be my memory but with as much mods as have been done the point is mute. No longer original.

Front end may have been swapped out because they had to (crash) or simply because they wanted an upgrade. Radial brakes and adjustable forks are a mod worth doing to some.
 

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Different bars too.. Flat bars may not be comfortable.ditch the synth oil and use the mineral just change it really often
 

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Wow, I must be seeing a different bike than everyone else. This isn't the bike I'd recommend for a first Ducati. Too much on it has been changed for who knows what reason and judging by the pics and description, the work wasn't done to a very high standard.

Camo dip? Flat black everywhere else? That the lights work is a selling point? "Steering wheel dampner"? Needs chain and front sprocket (but the rear sprocket is ok? Not likely). Eventually needs a full wiring harness? (WHY?) Hacked frame with what looks like a DIY license plate bracket? Does the bike have a speedo??? WTF is up with the clutch reservior? Hard to tell from the pics but is the front brake lever bent out? Why does he keep talking about electrical stuff and points out it comes with a schematic??? Seller states the bike definitely needs work... as in even after all the crap he's done to it, it's still not right.

Anniversay edition? The monster came out in 1993... is this the coveted 7th anniversary edition? 2000 was not a special edition anniversary year for anything in the Ducati line up. Ducvet is right, even if it was a special edition it's been screwed with so much now that any added worth would be gone anyway.

The ad is written by someone who knows nothing about Ducati (nor I'm guessing bkes in general), and the work was done by someone with little attention to detail. To me everything about this bike says RUN AWAY.

It's cheap for a reason. Do yourself a HUGE favor, spend more money up front on a nicer bike, and avoid the money pit of a project this bike will be. Cheap Ducatis are rarely the right bikes for newbs.

Seriously. Run away. It's a parts bike, or at the very least a project for someone who knows what they're doing.

EDIT: Ok, so I looked at the ad and the aftermarket tach he mentions has a speedo on it too. So the mileage stated is documented where? And that aftermarket gauge is showing KPH if I'm seeing it right. FFS they couldn't even bother to set that correctly???

Run away...
 

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Keep in mind I am proficient working on these bikes so I might be skewed in my advice.

I see a monster as a pile of parts to have fun with. Yes they are good bikes in stock form but as one of the most produced Ducatis they just scream modify me. That is I would not care if it had non-oem parts if the parts are what I want. I see no down side to the forks if done right and are in good shape.

Many bikes need chain and sprockets as well as tune and other wear items. This one appears to have had the valves done recently so that is a savings. I would check for belt history and if none is found change them too.

The harness is not common but possible I would be more concerned that the owner has a schematic.

Condition is one thing but do we know if the current owner did any of the work/mods? I have seen good mods done from previous owner left to poor care .I agree that some of what we see is not great but it is a $1900 monster that might be had for $1500. That gives the poster a fair amount of money to make it their own.


A few years ago I had a friend buy a m900 with a broken frame for $1500. He put another $2000 into it to make it right. His son bought the same year m900 for $3500 in great shape. My friend was bummed his son had a great bike for the same money without realizing he had a custom bike the son dreamed of while the sons bike was mostly stock.

long story short sometimes it is better to start with a cheap bike with good basics than a perfect bike you are going to part out. Depends on what the buyer is looking for.
 

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i'm proficient in these bikes. i occasionally buy a cheap one. never had one not turn into a money pit. part of that is my obsession to fix them right, part that i tend to buy chunks of crap. it's got some good mods, tempered by sounding like it's had a reason to have all that stuff replaced or hidden with black and plastidip. i'd expect it to be pretty rough up close.

if it was immaculate, he'd want a lot more. there's a reason behind that, and it never works out for me. but then i usually have delusion of selling after playing and not losing money. if you want to keep it, anything can be fixed. except the fact that buying a good one would ultimately be cheaper.
 

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Keep in mind I am proficient working on these bikes <snip>
…which puts you in a totally different situation than the OP. From what I'm gathering he has no experience working on Ducatis (or any other bike?) and will be relying on a shop to get this bike to useable shape.

I may well be reading too much into this but I'm guessing that the OP is thinking "Hmmm, for about $2k I could be into a DUCATI!" meaning he wants to buy the bike, pay someone to install a chain and front sprocket, and have a useable bike.

Ain't gonna happen.

Advice seems to be coming from people that are thinking "Well he could buy this for $1500, search around for a few parts that will work on it, spend a few hundred on a chain and sprockets, clean up the electrical work, tend to the typical issues they all have, and have a basis for a project that could be kinda fun and a good learning experience". And if you've been around the block a few times, know where to get what you need and can install it in your own garage on evenings and weekends, and have another bike to ride when the parts for this haven't shown up yet, then, well, it still isn't going to happen that way but you've been around the block a few times and deep down already knew that. You enjoy the process and that's fine.

Is the OP looking for a learning experience or a bike to ride?

Here's what I envision happening.

The OP buys the bike for $1700. Spends about $500 having the obvious stuff fixed. Then tries to use the bike as a normal motorcycle but there are all these nagging details that interfere with that. Now he's thinking "WTF, my 250 was plug and play, these Italian bikes really do need a lot of maintenance!" as he spends $100 here and $100 there buying carb kits and other junk trying to keep the plugs from fouling every 150 miles.

Electrical gremlins start to get worse so he attempts to replace some of the harness. The cable to the starter? No big deal. Until the terminal on the start spins and oops, time for a rebuild there. But the rebuild parts aren't quite right so screw it, time for a new starter motor. Pulling the sidecover for that reveals a ton of silicone sealer the last guy used to stem the oil leak, so clean all that up, buy some new seals, a gasket or two, and a more silicone sealer because he can't dress the cover well enough to remove the screwdriver marks from the last guy who pried it off the case.

Yadda yadda yada, a year later he's got $3500 into the bike, it kind of sort of works most of the time now, but he doesn't really trust it and then half way through that beautiful Saturday afternoon ride, the headlight connector melts and he's done with these POS Italian bikes. Time to sell it. The added $1800 has increased the "worth" of the bike a whopping $500 as the best offer he gets is $2200 from a guy who wants to cut off more of the subframe, yank the fenders, and put a skateboard deck on it for a seat.

Final tally - the OP is out $1300 and a lot of hours screwing with a POS Ducati that let him down more times than he can count. but he's glad to be rid of it and will never buy another Italian bike again, ever, because they SUCK. His never ran right. And all his friends have the same view of them after having to help him load it into the back of the truck all those weekends. "Those Ducati guys are idiots!"

Ok, fine, it's early and I'm rambling, but still. Fantasy vs reality. What does the OP truly want/expect out of the bike? From what I'm reading, the fantasy will not match the reality and it will not be a pleasant ownership experience. He's put 50k miles on a 250 in three years. Doesn't sound like a guy who enjoys working on bikes to me. Sounds like a guy who likes riding them. A 750 Monster might work great for him. THIS 750 Monster? Seriously? Spend the extra money on one that has been taken care of. Bummed you'll be riding a stock Ducati instead of working on someone else's custom? Go back to the fantasy part. Was the fantasy fixing someone else's mistakes, or riding a Ducati?

OP, What are you expecting out of the bike? I'm reading into things when I say you should run away. But again, to me, this is a parts bike. A donor for some other project you might have in mind. If you want an inexpensive bike that's reliable and fun to ride on weekends, this is a horrible place to start.
 

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The Op has not re-posted so this may be beating a dead horse at this point.

But I would add that without someone taking a real look at the bike we do not know what the bike is. I see plenty of cosmetically rough bikes that are rock solid mechanically, flip side is I also see perfect looking bikes that need major work.

I have had customers buy "creampuff showbikes" that turned out to have bent frames. Bad main bearings, rod bearings,rocker arms and on fully faired bikes complete nightmare under the pristine bodywork. I have seen bikes that were beautiful that customers destroyed bearings and electrics by cleaning. there is more to a motorcycle that how nice it looks.



The ad states the bike was just tuned and it does not sound like someone capable of doing the work owned the bike. So just because it is looking like a rat bike does not mean it is truly is one. Only someone taking a close look would know.

None of this means it is a good bike, The OP stated that it would go to a local shop to be inspected before buying. It all sounds reasonable as does the caution you are recommending. Buying a good example is always best but is best based on looks,mods ,mechanical condition? I would think we would agree that all of the above is the best answer. Without the OP letting us know we have no idea what the OP wants,needs or considers best.
 

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That bike has been on Craigslist for at least 4 months.

My friend inquired about it months ago, and I remember him telling me it was "sketch"; sorry I don't have more information.

I remember it was listed at around 3.5 at one time. I'm not surprised the price has dropped drasticsllddrastically.

But of course the best way to gauge it is to experience it in-person. Best of luck.

Also, I'm not sure if you're part of this group already, but there's a FBT group called "Los Angeles Motorcycle Riders"; some friends and I are in that group. If youre down, let's ride sometime.
 
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