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Discussion Starter #1
I was replacing a worn clutch on my 999 and was asked if I would take some pictures along the way. So here are the pictures and the steps in the process which I followed.

If anyone has any corrections they would like me to add just let me know and thanks to the people who gave me advice along the way when I was doing the job.

The upload size on the forum is very small. So sorry the images are not very good quality now. If anyone has a way of up loading it at 1.7MB I would be glad to know.
 

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Nice write up on .PDF!

Thanks for the plug on the needle bearing.. just know that I've only had to do one on my SS, and it came out easily with an angled pick. Others have posted that theirs have not come out so easily. You results may vary ;)

One other note on the pushrod seals: I've seen the "wavy" marking on the seal oriented on either side after changing 3 of them on different bikes; so I would not consider that a reliable reference. The seal should be oriented so any pressure would force the seal against the pushrod.(see crude drawing) If it's installed backwards, it will leak oil into the clutch (been there, done that :eek:) Also a good idea to renew the o-rings on the slave cylinder side of the pushrod.
 

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Well done James. I'm the guy who asked you to document project as this will be my next project. Really appreciate the time and effort. Just one question-how come you decided to use the latex gloves on the last step instead the first??? :confused: thanks again Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks for the comments and Bella749 thanks for the info and diagram on the Push Rod Seal. I will change that in the wright up and in my bike! I will also add the diagram.

Is there any way to edit the post now?

I checked my old seal and by the looks of it, it was also orientated the other way. I think 'wavy side out' is correct.

I will also add the Plate order and to clean the oil from the Driven Plates with Brake/Clutch Cleaner before assembly. And post the new edited version up.
 

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wow...really good write-up...I was considering tackling the clutch this winter and this post came just in time. Can you let us know what tools you used in the process. I have a full ratchet set and numerous tools but want to be completely prepared before I tacle this job.
thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #8
wow...really good write-up...I was considering tackling the clutch this winter and this post came just in time. Can you let us know what tools you used in the process. I have a full ratchet set and numerous tools but want to be completely prepared before I tacle this job.
thanks
Glad you enjoyed the wright up.
The tools you will need to do the job are fairly standard apart from the Clutch Holding Tool which you will need to torque the Basket and Drum back up again.

The one I used had way too short a handle and in my opinion did not protrude into the Clutch far enough. You could make one yourself out of old plates but I don't know it it is worth the hassle. (If anyone has found a really good one I would be glad to head about it?)

You can also use it when loosening the 32mm (from memory) Drum Nut, but an Impact Gun is far easier.
The hydraulic ones are best, but you can get electric ones pretty cheap. I've had mine since my Scooter tuning days, when I used to use it to take the Centrifugal Clutch off and its still going strong and that was about 14 years ago.

You also need a Torque Wrench, with the correct range to do everything back up again and a Vernier Gauge and Feller Gauge to take your measurements.

You might want a Hot Air Gun and a Rubber/Nylon Mallet if you are replacing bearings and a Die if you are reusing the Basket Bolts, to remove the old Thread Lock.

It might be worth replacing the the Push Rod Seal also (make sure you get it the right way around!) and a Pic could be used to remove it. Also check the Needle Bearing while you are in there.

I've just ordered a new Push Rod Seal and I've edited the wright up some more, but I'm waiting to get a photo of the Push Rod Seal being fitted the wright way before posting it up again and I'll also include a list of Tools needed.

Socket Set
Clutch Holding Tool
Impact Gun
Torque Wrench
Vernier Gauge
Feller Gauge
Hot Air Gun
Rubber/Nylon Mallet
Threading Die
Pic
 

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Glad you enjoyed the wright up.
The tools you will need to do the job are fairly standard apart from the Clutch Holding Tool which you will need to torque the Basket and Drum back up again.

The one I used had way too short a handle and in my opinion did not protrude into the Clutch far enough. You could make one yourself out of old plates but I don't know it it is worth the hassle. (If anyone has found a really good one I would be glad to head about it?)

You can also use it when loosening the 32mm (from memory) Drum Nut, but an Impact Gun is far easier.
The hydraulic ones are best, but you can get electric ones pretty cheap. I've had mine since my Scooter tuning days, when I used to use it to take the Centrifugal Clutch off and its still going strong and that was about 14 years ago.

You also need a Torque Wrench, with the correct range to do everything back up again and a Vernier Gauge and Feller Gauge to take your measurements.

You might want a Hot Air Gun and a Rubber/Nylon Mallet if you are replacing bearings and a Die if you are reusing the Basket Bolts, to remove the old Thread Lock.

It might be worth replacing the the Push Rod Seal also (make sure you get it the right way around!) and a Pic could be used to remove it. Also check the Needle Bearing while you are in there.

I've just ordered a new Push Rod Seal and I've edited the wright up some more, but I'm waiting to get a photo of the Push Rod Seal being fitted the wright way before posting it up again and I'll also include a list of Tools needed.

Socket Set
Clutch Holding Tool
Impact Gun
Torque Wrench
Vernier Gauge
Feller Gauge
Hot Air Gun
Rubber/Nylon Mallet
Threading Die
Pic


so I have everything except the clutch holding tool....any ideas where I can get something like that....
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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You can simply put the bike in 6th gear and have someone stomp on the rear brake while you remove the nut.

You can also build your own clutch tool using the old clutch plates as seen in this pic of a home made tool:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3184922373/#

Here is a quote of how that tool was built:

"You can make the tool, it sorta looks frankenstein-ish, but it works. I got a few of the plates together and a piece of inch and a half flat stock. Used painters tape to tape the plates together, then drilled them for a small bolt/nut. Only needed three bolts to hold the plates together. Then drill for the metal handle. Wrap some electrical tape around the handle... tah dah!"

Here is the orginal thread where that came from:

http://ducatimonsterforum.org/index.php?topic=23079.msg408084#msg408084
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I had a look at the Push Rod seal last night and it is defiantly the right way around in my bike. The wavy pattern is to the inside but the lip is also facing inwards.

You can see in the photo that the Push Rod seal on the bench has the a piece of wire in the lip (to point it out) and the lip is to the wavy side but the one in the bike is the opposite.
(If anyone understands this they deserve a medal!:))

I'm not sure how to describe the orientation of the Push Rod Seal in the wright up so I will just edit it to show the diagram posted by Bella749.
 

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One of the best documentation I have seen. Just curious what kind of riding you do though to trash the clutch so quick? Not that you are doing something wrong just seem pretty low mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The bike was new to me when I changed the clutch. So I'm not sure what type of riding it has had before I got it, but it is in very good condition so its not been abused but may have had some town riding, maybe.
Also I had a loose flywheel when I got it which made it run very rough which wouldn't have helped but I think 5500 miles is about average for an aluminum OEM clutch.
 

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Hmm, my 999 had nearly 7000 miles on it before I sold it and it run great, I'm surprised to see people already changing their clutches around the 5K mark. :eek:

It must have something to do with the fact that I hardly every thrashed it, and the first owner was an older gentleman that didn't strike me as the type to gun it everywhere he went either.
 

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To make a large file available to the public for down load, you can go to this website, open an account, and they give you 10 gig. (I think) of space for free. The whole thing is completely free, I use it...

http://www.4shared.com/
 
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