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Discussion Starter #41
2007 AND LEAKING??!!!! How can my 2007 ss800 have a leak in the tank after buying the bike just over two years ago new from the dealer? I have read most of the posts in this thread there are a lot of them, any problems with the fixes now that they have been used a couple of years? Any chance Ducati has stepped up and is replacing the tanks now?
In short, no.

They used steel tanks.
Invariably, gas has moisture in it.
The bikes are no longer in production.
That leaves us to fix it.
 

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POR-15 gone bad....well installation gone bad by prior owner or a shop he took it to. Starting with this


Huge build up of POR-15 and looks like they did not prep the tank. Looks to me like they just dumped it in and rolled it around alittle bit, not even letting the tank dry! So after some work here is where I am at now.


Below is the PILE of stuff that came out after scraping it out. I used screw drivers and a wire brush. Note that the thick stuff was easier to pull off than the thinner stuff. Some is still bonded to the tank and can not be removed. I still have more work to do tomorrow but after 2 hours of scraping and pealing I had to stop.
 

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Ok after all the treatment this is what I got.


This is after application and before its dry. Looks alot better and I sponged the excess out with supplied sponge brush. Now got to wait 3 days and for my new fuel sensor to come in.

 

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i repair it using Bison Epoxy solution. Very cheap and reliable solution for now. I repair it 5 months ago and looks good.
 

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Here is a question for those that have done this. If the tank only rusts in the bottom towards the hinge, why is it necessary to seal the whole inside of the tank?
 

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The masters way to repair it

Ok, so before you judge, this worked amazingly. This is how a professional improvises, lol, I had no duct tape or cork to seal the drain valves or cap opening. So I sealed the bottom valves with the balloon animal balloons, and then sealed the gas cap hole by sticking a balloon in, blowing it up till it would not pull thru, and then blowing it up more while keeping pressure on it so it sealed both sides, still waiting in the 4 day waiting period after, but it looks really nice, and even, and made sure to do all the steps, cuz skipping any steps to save time can really mess things up. Oh and by the way, warning to all, the metal ready stinks really bad, so just be ready, cuz when you get a whiff of that, it really knocks you back.
 

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Now I am a bit confused. Was the tank previous lined as that is what I seem to have read in your posting. But in the photos it doesn't look as if it was lined.
 

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Let me start off by saying I am not associated, by any means, with POR-15.
I bought it from Por-15 Outlet here in Texas, and paid retail price for the kit.
I got the motorcycle tank repair kit, and it is for steel tanks only.
I have no endorsement from them (although sponsorship would be nice [wink]).

I am copying their directions with my own anecdotes, experiences, and warnings inserted. Larger version pics are in the gallery and are available for viewing.

Here is my story.

I bought several gas tanks from eBay. One I had painted the fluorescent yellow to match the fairings et al.
One day I was riding along, and parked, only to smell fuel.
I had a leak!
I tried the 2 part epoxy, but alas, that was a band-aid on a open wound. With the help of Jaguara, we epoxied the hell out of the seam, and around the hinge where the tank is mounted to the frame. Despite our best efforts, the leak continued to worsen.
So, I posted here for help. One member suggested POR-15. (Thank you Rebelpacket). I ordered it and followed the directions. Here is my experience with the product, and why I think it is the best stuff since water based lubricants!;)

I took off the tank, removed the filler, and all the fuel pump stuff, filters, etc..

Down to the bare tank.
What did I see?



Yes, that red stuff you see is rust.
How did it get there?
Simple, there was a debate about water being in fuel, blah blah blah
It is and here is proof. Water is denser than fuel so it sinks to the lowest spot.
The back corners of the tank.

So, here goes the repair...

MOTORCYCLE FUEL TANK REPAIR KIT POR-15

PLEASE READ THIS INFORMATION CAREFULLY BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO REPAIR YOUR FUEL OR UTILITY TANK

Kit Contains:
1-Quart (949mls) Marine Clean
1-Quart (949mls) Metal Ready
1-8 oz (236mls) Gas Tank Sealer
1- piece of repair cloth
1- 1? foam brush


SUGGESTED SUPPLEMENTAL SUPPLIES
Latex Gloves (I din't use these, but I am TOUGH! HA!)
Eye Protection (I wear glasses)
Bucket and access to hot water and a garden hose (In my case a shower and tub)
Soft rags for wiping any chemical spills on the exterior of
the tank
Duct tape for sealing up openings in the tank (petcock hole, etc.)
Work bench and/or soft padding to lay the tank on.
Sandpaper

THESES DIRECTIONS ARE FOR STEEL TANKS ONLY
It is important to understand each product in your repair kit and how it works because proper chemical interaction is essential for achieving the best possible bond of the sealer to the inside of the tank.

THE NATURE OF FUEL
All organic fossil fuels (gasoline. diesel fuel, fuel, oil, etc.) gradually deteriorate if left unused in a tank. If a tank ?sits? for months or years, gum and varnish deposits form on the walls of
the tank, and are very difficult to remove: Often, it is hard to see this contamination because the tank looks okay even though the deposits are present. It is always best to assume there?s foreign matter or contamination in a tank you wish to restore, even though the tank may appear to be perfectly clean.

MARINE-CLEAN
This is the first product you will use in the restoration of your fuel or utility tank. Marine-Clean is a very powerful cleaner that will break down gum and varnish deposits in your fuel tank, but it will take time and often-repeated application. A hot solution of Marine-Clean is more effective than a cold solution. This product is caustic and alkaline, and therefore your tank must be neutralized and acidified before gas tank sealer can be used most effectively.

METAL-READY
Metal-Ready is an excellent prep for any coating or paint product, and its essential that it be used before gas tank sealer is applied to your tank. Metal-Ready is also the best rust remover available, and it will dissolve all the rust and scale that has formed in your tank. In instances of heavily built-up rust formed over many years of neglect, the application and use of Metal-Ready will enable your POR-15 Fuel Tank Sealer to chemically bond with whatever rust may remain in the tank and form a permanent non-porous barrier against further rusting. The primary job of Metal-Ready is to change the ph of your tank from alkaline to acid, because coatings and paints stick much better to acid-prepped metals. Be sure to rinse your tank thoroughly with water afterward, neutralizing the surface.

TANK SEALER
The Tank Sealer in your kit is impervious to all conventional automotive and diesel fuels. The most important thing to remember is that your tank must be totally, completely, bone-dry before the sealer can be poured into it.


1. PREPARATION: Empty tank of all fuel and rinse out with clean water, remove fuel petcock, float, filters, fittings, etc. Seal up those openings in the tank with duct tape or cork to keep the solutions in the tank when you clean, prep and seal the tank.

2. Outside painted surface of your tank should be protected from preparation and sealing products with soft rags or other suitable protection.

3. MARINE CLEAN: This product cleans varnish and rust out of the tank. It leaves the metal surface alkaline and must be treated with METAL-READY to create an acidic surface for the sealant to stick to. GLOVES AND EYE PROTECTION SHOULD BE WORN AT ALL TIMES.

Mix your quart of MARINE CLEAN with 1 quart of VERY WARM (not scalding hot) water. Extremely hot water could melt the adhesive on the duct tape.
Note: The higher temperature of the water helps to activate the chemical process of the cleaner.
Pour the mixture into the tank, shake vigorously, and "roll" the tank around to ensure the cleaner gets to all inside surfaces for a minimum of 20 minutes. Now empty the solution from the tank and rinse it out with water.

Rainman says I didn't take pictures of this, as it looks like soapy water. Palmolive diluted. I did the "rolling" of the tank for 90 minutes, actually just turning the tank into different positions every 5 minutes.

METAL-READY: This product makes the metal surface acidic and removes rust, which is necessary for the sealer to effectively bond to the surface.
Pour the entire bottle of Metal-Ready into the tank. NOTE: Tank should be empty of rinsing water but does not have to be dry before using metal ready. Roll the tank around to ensure it coats all surfaces for a minimum of 20 minutes. Place the tank in different positions every half hour until the entire inside of the tank has been treated with Metal-Ready. Metal-Ready should not be in the tank longer than 2 hours. Rinse the tank thoroughly with WARM - not scalding hot - water several times and drain it thoroughly (low spots in tanks collect water, so be sure to roll tank around to get as much water out as possible).

Rainman says- Again I did this for 90 minutes.
Here is what it looked like with the metal ready in it.




In order to get the tank completely dry, you must blow warm air into it because no tank will dry out on the inside by itself. The only way to do this job is to use forced air. This can be accomplished by using a hair dryer or hot air gun. TANKS MUST BE COMPLETELY DRY INSIDE BEFORE SEALING. THE SEALER WILL NOT STICK TO A DAMP OR WET TANK. No shortcuts, please. If any moisture is present in the tank when you pour in the sealer, IT WILL NOT WORK PROPERLY and all your hard work will be wasted.

NOTE: Once the metal is treated, it can flash rust. Though the coating is designed to bond with any new flash rust, ideally you'll want to perform the forced air-drying promptly after draining the tank, and coat the tank with sealant soon after drying it.

Rainman says- Okay, I took this seriously, and used a blow dryer. The tank got hot! And it did flash rust.

It looked like this-




4. PATCHING -If you have any big exterior-to-interior leaks - we recommend performing this step before the sealant step.
There are several methods to fix holes, but you must fix them before you put the POR-15 sealer into the tank. First, remove all paint around area to be patched. Soak area with Metal-Ready and keep wet for a minimum of 30 minutes; then rinse with water and dry. Next, paint area with a liberal amount of gas tank sealer and place a small piece of repair cloth (provided) over the wet painted area. Now, brush paint sealer over repair cloth from the center outward so that the painted cloth is stretched evenly over repaired area. Let patched area dry for 96 hours.

If you aren't aware of any holes, check to make sure you don't have new ones now that the chemicals have removed the rust layer The tank cleaning process may reveal new leaks in the tank after removing rust and rust deposits from weakened and thin tank walls. These areas are likely to be in the low points and seams, especially if there are low tank areas below the level of the petcock. These areas may have collected water from tank condensation and water in your fuel and over time may corrode the tank metal. Carefully check these areas for leaks when you have fluid in there {it will only be a very small trickle if there is a pinhole leak}.

5. SEALER: {open the POR-15 Sealer and stir until a uniform color is achieved.}

Rainman says- This took me 20 minutes. You have to do it by hand, shaking it introduces bubbles and problems.

CAUTION! Pour entire contents of can into the tank. Roll the tank SLOWLY to ensure it coats the insides uniformly. In tanks with seams, and with low areas below the opening through which you are draining the sealant (typically the petcock hole) the sealant will puddle. Take great care to ensure you've drained out the excess. Any pooled material can cause you trouble later.
IMPORTANT! This is a very strong and durable coating. Take care to immediately clean surfaces on which you may have spilled the sealer. Any sealer remaining on painted surfaces will become permanent. Any excess sealer must be cleaned from screw hole threads for the petcock before it dries. A clean soft rag can be twisted into the screw holes to clean the material out. A Q-Tip is also effective for this job.

Rainman says-
I did this properly. And when they say "immediately clean surfaces on which you may have spilled the sealer. Any sealer remaining on painted surfaces will become permanent." they mean it! I have three drip marks, that I have tried to remove with Xylol, acetone, simple green, and any chemical in my cabinet, including easy off. NOTHING takes it off. Not even a razor blade. And this is on a gloss tile surface.
This is what it looked like when it was freshly wet with the sealer.



6. FINAL NOTES
Follow directions on sealer can and let cure for at least 96 hours (4 days) before pouring in fuel.
CAUTION: Leftover sealer may not be used again. Pour it back into can, then add a little water, and let it sit until the next day when the sealer is hardened in the can and can then be thrown out with the garbage.


Rainman says-
The sealer hardens in the can in no time, just toss it.
I let the tank dry for 4 full days.

The end result is this-



End result?

2000 miles, Texas summer heat, and not a drop leaked.
I plan on doing ALL of my tanks now.
An ounce of prevention....

Any questions? PM me and I can answer.
Sorry but what sort of two part epoxy did you use before? It doesnt look as if was epoxy coated. .
 

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you dont really need any epoxy before you do this, i used some jbweld to try to seal my hole before, it worked for maybe a month, then started to leak again, but the por 15 kit i ordered was about 50 dollars with shipping and all, but it comes with everything to seal your tank of most small holes, it comes with a cloth to put over bigger holes also, and a sponge to put some of the sealant onto the cloth to patch, but if you have just a small leak, even if you have a little rust, this kit will clean it of the rust and should seal it, i havent used it for a long time like the guy who posted, but i did mine about a week ago, and it seems to be working great.
 

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I know this is an old post, but....

I'm about to do my tank. Not because it leaks, but because it sat for a year plus and the interior is rusted all to hell. Especially the TOP.
I keep reading the directions, and looking at the pics in regards to the tubes. I have all of them closed off from the outside of the tank. I'm assuming this is to keep the solutions from running out all over the place. (a few pieces of plastic aquarium tubing fit the ends perfectly.
My question is, do they need to be closed off from INSIDE the tank as well???
It would stand to reason that the inside of these tubes has 'grown' rust as well, and the POR-13 would address this issue.
Is my thought process correct in allowing the inside of the tubes be treated/coated as well, or am I in left field?
 

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Have a kit ready to go, have spent today removing my tank, emptying it of fuel & all the internals etc...

I have taped off all the tubes & holes bar the big top hole - no-one has said how they sealed this up when rolling the tank around, I take it you left it open & were just careful to not tip any fluid out? :confused:
 

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I have a to-do list for my carby which I am steadily working my way down, eeeking out all the niggles & weirdness which they are known for & hopefully making this into a very competent tidy reliable motorcycle! (stop laughing at the back!)

This was next on my list - sorting out any tank rot issues... The carby tank's will rust the same as any other tanks? The trouble being their shape - any water/condensation will sink to the bottom of the petrol itself, this is at it's lowest point at the back two corners where it will gather in a large puddle??!





Rust never sleeps... it will eat through the base of the tank/tank seams, the first you will know of this will be petrol dripping through your tank?!

The wet patch at the back is water. There was a similar patch on the right, the clamp gubbins in the middle holds the fuel pump/teabag filter & the silver blob at the back-right is the drain bung bolt.

Bought myself one of these kits:

eBay - The UK's Online Marketplace

The infamous POR-15 treatment... all the washing etc will take a few hours, the sealant itself takes FOUR DAYS to dry... seeing as its been peeing down for the last week or two I saw fit to get this out of the way before Summer/I did have any leakage issues...

Run fuel down low. Get out and cane it for an hour or two.

Undo the breather on top, lift the tank, shut off the fuel tap, undo the pipe clamps (7mm socket works best), have some rag handy to catch any errant petrol spillage, there is always some... remove the overflow, feed & return lines & tape the ends up to stop any gak getting in there.



Get somebody to support the tank whilst you remove the pin & pivot from the back of it - hard to do both yourself & dropping it is not an option!

Pop the tank cap & drain the tank by using either the drain bolt or the tap itself? Found it easier using the drain bolt as it then pees straight down into the container rather than having a hectic horizontal beer-pee everywhere.

Rest the tank on something soft - old cushions, blankets or cardboard is good? With the cap up loosen the six retaining allen grubscrews (2mm key, use a GOOD one!) by 3mm, no need to take them out.

Now the fun part. With the tank on the floor between your ankles, hook two fingers in the cap in a g-spot stylee and PULL.

Pull harder! Be prepared for a fight, farting & swearing, they don't come out easy.



Got it? Good. Had mine out before Xmas to remove & bypass the fuel filter (new smaller filter added here on the left externally, also extra handier fuel tap) so didn't give me too much grief?
 

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Disconnect the overflow line inside the tank & remove the cap.

**Sidenote** On further inspection my overflow pipe was blocked, also the metal bend inside the tank??! Must had accumulated crap & debris down it over the years falling down the overflow hole? Cleared out the metal bend with copper wire held in pliers & all good.



Feed pipe is on the right, bends round from the rubber tube on the right, middle is the return pipe, exits at the top front of the tank, righthand is the tank overflow.

Pop the fuel pump out of its clamps... will be a very tight dry fit, may be worth giving it a quick careful squirt with gt-85/wd40 or similar?



Enough wire length to let you take it out without disconnecting the wires - you will need to remove them to remove the fuel sender unit though... take your time as there are small washers & nuts involved...

Remove the fuel tap (14mm spanner?), one of the threads is lefthand so it will unscrew off both threads when undone, retrieve the small plastic or copper washer.

Remove the fuel sender. This nut is a big b*gger & my largest adjustable only just fitted??

Rinse the tank out with water. At this stage before throwing and chemical nastiness inside my tank I saw fit to bag it up to stop any paint marking etc...

 

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Duct-tape off all holes left, pipes etc.

Follow the instructions in the kit.

WEAR GOGGLES/GLOVES & GLASSES.

No shortcuts, no "I cant be bothered with that bit". The kit's end result will depend on you doing a Proper Job.

Add the Marine Clean (heavy duty degreaser/varnish remover) pre-mixed with another litre of hot (not boiling, or all the duct-tape will fall off and you will be in a right state....) water & swish it around, leaving the tank in different positions. When you are happy it has done its job then rinse the tank out with cold water (hosepipe )

Add the "Prep & Ready", this nasty blue stuff will remove if not neutralize any rust and also acid-etch the inside of the tank. Take all the time you like to swish it around, can't be in there any longer than two hours mind?

Here's the tank just before I rinsed it out:





S'better!

Empty the "Prep & Ready" out (Its reusable! Empty it back into the same container & keep it for later.), & rinse the tank out with warm water. With the aid of my understanding partner I took the tank upstairs and jetted it out with the showerhead.

Remove any tape to ensure no trapped water & dry it out with microfibre or similar - paper towel can tear on any rough spots inside, make sure you get it all out!

The tank has to be 101% dry before you add the sealant. Get a hairdryer or hot air gun and give it a good blasting... I got mine so damn dry I nearly burnt myself when I picked it up again.

Retape any pipes & mix the sealant thoroughly. Add the can's contents to the tank, use a paintbrush to do any metalwork inside (pipes, pump holder etc), tape up the inside rim of the filler hole and now tape it shut completely.

Slowly roll the tank around allowing the inside the get completely covered by the sealant - the previous acid etch will ensure it sticks like sh!t to a blanket so no worries...

When you are happy its all been done remove the filler hole tape & drain the excess back into the pot through the drain bolt hole.

No pooling of any sealant is allowed - use the supplied foam brush to mop any up, this will take about 30 minutes so keep an eye on it...

Let tank dry - this will take 96 hours/4 days, more if you aren't sure?

And this is where I am now... had a peek last night & its looking good!
 

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Hi Guys,

This is a second hand tank that I bought as my original was headed for the bin.

I bought the Por 15 pack and used it as follows -

The instructions say to use duck tape or masking tap to block holes. Please don't use either for the larger hole under the tank as I nearly lost 1/4 of the Marine clean. I found a cap from a used water bottle worked a treat.


I then cut a thin piece of plastic to cover the larger opening to see what was happening and also not to spill any product.


Before I spilled out the metal ready I used these brushes to loosen up any rust or Stubborn spots


What the tank looked like after the treatment. It should give a blue hazy colour to the metal whilst the metal ready is doing its stuff.

Use a Hair dryer to completely dry the tank also shake the tank to allow excess water trapped out.

Poured the Final solution in and all is good...

Main tip - Don't use duck tape or masking tape for the large hot under the tank!! find a cap that fits.
Cheers
Joe
 

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