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I want to remove the tank to do some maintenance and check the suspect hose clamps etc over the winter. I have read the shop manual and it says "drain tank and remove unions from flange". No further instructions. After seeing the scary pictures in the FIREBALL thread and looking at the somewhat cheezy and delicate looking plastic "unions" I thought I should ask the proper procedure for "removing unions from flange" before I break them by prying/twisting/squeezing them improperly. Also I am curious if the fuel actually needs to be drained or if it will stay inside the tank rather like an air quick disconnect keeps the air inside. After I was shut out, my 12 year old son pleaded with SWMBO (without my prompting I might add) to help up his cool factor with his buddies when they come over to play by letting me keep the Duc in the family room over the winter. She can't refuse him anything, so I don't want any gas smell escaping and causing rescindance of the privelidge of warm inside storage. Or loss of the fine view from the couch. If the gas stays inside, I can drain it out in the garage after removal to preserve the peace. Thanks for sharing your insight and experience!
 

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StraDuc,

I just removed the tank on my Sport 1000 at the weekend,so I'll explain what I did.I'm making the assumption that the GT is the same as the Sport or Paul Smart.

MAKE SURE THE BIKE IS COLD AND HAS NOT BEEN RUN, or you and Blitzen will be best buddies!!

First of all I did it outside to avoid gas spill and fumes in the Garage, good job I did, because it's messy. don't do it inside,take it back in when all fuel residue has evaporated.

First thing I did was remove the battery and its box, two bolts and it pivots back. Remove the ground first then the positive. It will lift out after that. My dealer suggested I did that first so I had more room to get to the "Quick Disconnects".

The tricky part!, you have seen the cheap looking black plastic "Ring" that holds the disconnect on. There are 4 or 5 little Vertical grooves on two sides of it at the top. You need to have your'e thumb and finger on those grooves,with you're second hand hold on to the bottom of the disconnect. How you doing!.

Push up gently on the bottom and squeeze the ring of the disconnect with your fingers, hard. As you squeeze the ring, tug the disconnect down.Don't wiggle it from side to side you could damage the "o"ring in the disconnect.

A little fuel will leak from the tank, but most of the mess happens because the fuel runs back from the "in" "out" lines, be sure to put some tape around the fuel hoses and mark them,so you know which way round they go back.

Thats it, just unbolt the tank and it's off.There are a couple of vent hoses,but as you lift the tank clear, have someone else ( A non smoking neighbour, would be ideal!) gently pull those hoses from around the engine.

I drained the tank by opening the filler and pouring it out that way, it's messy. I made sure before I started that the tank was almost run dry so it was'nt too bad.

The only other way I can see is to take the fuel pump out, but you really don't want to have to do that.

Store the tank in a cool,well ventilated,dry place with the cap open, this will allow any gas residue to evaporate and hopefully you won't have a warped tank by spring. That's not inside in the livingroom!

Ah, Ducati ownership!

Thats It!
Hope that helps.
Nick.
 

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Thanks for the step by step guide.

I'll be doing mine in the next week or so, it's a big help.

What about the cables for the fuel pump? Shouldn't they come off early in the process?
 

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Oops!, missed the electrical component of the instructions!!

Ah, yeh.... Blah, blah, blah, yada, yada, yada,... and when you unbolt the tank,one bolt at the back. Pull the tank back slightly to free it from the front mounts, at this time you can undo the electrical connectors.

How's that! :p
 

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You guys are making this way too dificult... :)

First, don't remove the tank inside. It makes a huge mess. My wife is sensitive to smells, and I get a rash of $%&# every time I work on the tank, and that'e out in the garage with doors open.

Just ride the bike until the fuel light comes on. Then remove the single bolt at the back of the tank below the seat. You can then lift the tank up until the pump clears the frame. I just tilt the tank and it can rest on the frame with the bottom of the pump exposed. You can put some towels between the tank and frame if you're worried about scratches, etc.

You can then disconnect the wiring to the pump.

Now for the tricky part. I usually have a chair ready with towel draped over it to rest the tank on once it's removed. Reach up under the tank and pull off the vent and overflow hoses. You will need to get a pair of pliers up there to squeeze the spring around the overflow hose. Now, lift the front of the tank and swing it over to the side of the bike, nose the front down towards the foot pegs. You can either rest the tank of a chair next to the bike, or it you're real good, rest it on the footpeg. The idea is to get the remaining gas to the front of the tank.

Alternately you could siphon the gas out through the filler, with a pump or old fashioned style- petrol mouthwash.

Next, simply squeeze the sides of the quick couplings and gently pull them out. They will drain a little, butif you can tie them up above the frame rail they will stop. If you let them hang they will drian a lot. Some gas will come out of the pump housing as well. Pull the tank off.

Sounds complicated, but it's not. No need to remove the battery, side covers, etc.,etc.
 
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