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It was brought to my attention that on the 749S/R and 999R it is required to remove the heads in order to change out the closer shims if they are out of spec. Apparently the design is better in a sense they stay truer to spec and can tolerate more abuse. However, I heard recently the design wasn't in place on the early 999R bike, like what I have. I hosted a Testastretta workshop last year in order to gain the necessary knowledge to complete my own valve clearances. That was when I owned a 999S, so the above situation didn't apply. Can someone clarify?
 

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It was brought to my attention that on the 749S/R and 999R it is required to remove the heads in order to change out the closer shims if they are out of spec. Apparently the design is better in a sense they stay truer to spec and can tolerate more abuse. However, I heard recently the design wasn't in place on the early 999R bike, like what I have. I hosted a Testastretta workshop last year in order to gain the necessary knowledge to complete my own valve clearances. That was when I owned a 999S, so the above situation didn't apply. Can someone clarify?

It started with the 2005 models of 749S/R and 999R.

They use tapered style collets om the closers..
 

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Now I'm really glad I have an 03 999R, thanks Dave and Tye. However, kind of a bummer for the DIY person, plus gaskets aren't cheap.
 

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I was told not all 2005+ 749 Ses require head removal, but don't know what the difference is. I've heard that some bikes shipped with R heads like happened with the 748"s.
 

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I was told not all 2005+ 749 Ses require head removal, but don't know what the difference is. I've heard that some bikes shipped with R heads like happened with the 748"s.
It actually has nothing to do with the heads, its the retaining system used on the valves. To try and combat clearance issues, they used a retaining system which is harder to adjust, but was designed to stay spec all the time.

The only down side is; to REPLACE the closers, its recommended you pull the heads. The only reason why is because you need to put them on a special factory Ducati jig, which helps hold the assembly together. Plus, dropping a valve into the motor is not a great idea. I'm pretty sure you can do the job w/o pulling the heads, you'd just have to make your own tools.



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What I was saying is the valve train modification didn't come through on all 2005+ 749Ses. So with 749 Ses you may or may not have to pull the head.
 

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It started with the 2005 models of 749S/R and 999R.

They use tapered style collets om the closers..
So you have an "R" model and need this service, what are the costs involved to have a dealer do it.
Sometimes it seems that Ducati spent more time on how to make an engine that requires hundreds, maybe thousands of dollars of special tools to service it, then a more simplistic system for engine repair and adjustment. I'm absolutely floored on the special tools needed and their costs to service a 999, let alone other models!
 

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So you have an "R" model and need this service, what are the costs involved to have a dealer do it.
Sometimes it seems that Ducati spent more time on how to make an engine that requires hundreds, maybe thousands of dollars of special tools to service it, then a more simplistic system for engine repair and adjustment. I'm absolutely floored on the special tools needed and their costs to service a 999, let alone other models!
You have to remember that the "R" series was the homologation model. That's essentially a factory-spec racing machine. Ducati would not have been all that concerned with the servicability of their race-spec machines as opposed to the race environment servicability.

The non-R models are quite user friendly from a service stand point.
 

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You have to remember that the "R" series was the homologation model. That's essentially a factory-spec racing machine. Ducati would not have been all that concerned with the servicability of their race-spec machines as opposed to the race environment servicability.

The non-R models are quite user friendly from a service stand point.
Yes, I understand that...but it's not that much of a "racing" bike. Ducati's first win came w/ Lanzi winning on an essentially stock, sand casted swing armed 2003 999S w/ a LV exhaust in the 1st round of the EuroSuperbike race in Spain!
Check the parts # of the tools needed for the 749/999. To remove the head nuts requires a special Ducati wrench-cost.....$300, $300 for a wrench w/a funny bend in it!
 

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................but it's not that much of a "racing" bike. .................
Your opinion............

Never the less................... the rationale still stands.........
 

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Your opinion............

Never the less................... the rationale still stands.........
Well I wasn't demeaning the R's existence and why it was built. Hey, it not breaking news that motorcycle as well as car companies build these limited edition products to make money.....now I'm not sure, but I think the R was homologated for it's over square bore and TB set up more than anything else. Basically everything else is transferrable down the line to a base 999 in the later models. Ducat still had to rebuild that engine after every race weekend(hence their power playing WSBK and AMA for a bigger engine). If you ever looked at a AMA or WSBK 999 your never saw the suffix "R" on the race livery, only "Ducati 999". So I'm not sure if the "R" had more value in homolagation or just making Ducati extra profit.
 

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The R also has some minor differences in the frame, in particular there are only two footpeg positions, and the front tank support is bolted on rather than welded as on the base and S models (something about not being allowed to remove parts of the frame from the race bikes).

Tom
 

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Yes, I understand that...but it's not that much of a "racing" bike. Ducati's first win came w/ Lanzi winning on an essentially stock, sand casted swing armed 2003 999S w/ a LV exhaust in the 1st round of the EuroSuperbike race in Spain!
Check the parts # of the tools needed for the 749/999. To remove the head nuts requires a special Ducati wrench-cost.....$300, $300 for a wrench w/a funny bend in it!
Mine cost $15 from snapon
 

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There are some tools you just have to suck it up and get the Ducati issued tool, or as in ZDM's tool reference, there are cheaper alternatives available.

I am dreading the day the valves on my R bike will need changing. That will mean the heads will have to come off and be shipped to another country to get them done by a compotent mechanic..... Its only money and in the end you cant take it with you when you get issued your wooden coat one day.

SF
 
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