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Discussion Starter #1
The boredom of my two cents:

I had to swap my tires over the weekend and boy, if it's not a job in of itself. My goodness. No matter how much you take an image / notes / etc. of your work as reference, the actual doing of the work, re-installing is tough, without the help from a buddy. Unfortunately, I was on my own so for those of you who might need to do this in the future, you can either purchase some extra patience from the patience dept. or have a shop handle the work for you or simply call a fellow buddy over and have them help you.

It's just hard to hold your tire up, remove the axle, chain, caliper (without scratching the rim) without another hand. Would I do this again? No. Not to save a few bucks. It's just not worth the work you'll be looking forward to, when you have to do it all over again, in reverse, solo.

The positive out of all of this: I have new tires, and since the tires were off, I painted my metal swingarm blocks (external) / swingarm caps / inner swingarm spacers (blocks) / left-side axle end and right-side axle bolt satin black to match all the other black parts I've hit in the past. They look great I might add.

Anyway...
 

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Chilehead
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If you find wheel removal to be a chore (images, notes?), you really shouldn't be doing any maintenance on your bike.

I don't do it to save bucks, I do it to save time and insure that it's done correctly.

My tire guys love the fact that I'm faster than they are at R&Ring wheels, and I love the fact that they've never scratched a rim in nearly 20 years of doing business with them.

Tom
 

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it gets easier with practice...

i do my own wheels because it's fun (yes, i'm sick) and because i don't have to schedule a tech. i assume you've got a paddock stand - just get yourself a thin plank and slide it under the centerline of the tire, then lever it up a little and slide a piece of 2x4 under it. by pushing the little piece of 2x4 forward/backwards you can lift the tire/wheel to just the right height for removal/reinstall. oh, and after a few times you'll remember where all the spacers go too :)

for the front, i use a pair of tie-down straps from the garage rafters (i haven't bought a front stand yet) and sinch them to just get the wheel off the ground, then it's a piece of cake. you'll get the hang of twisting the calipers out of the rotors after you've done it a few times.
 

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Archimedes was right: With a lever you can move the world. And, you can lever your rear wheel up off the the floor to facititate reinstallation.

I thought about this little chore long and hard before actually tackling it. Everything that could dangle loose or mar the rims got cloth wrapped and taped up, or secured with bungee cords. Tools were all at hand. Parts got laid out in the order that they were removed, and I had a diagram at hand. (Thanks, Garth!) You could say that preparation began 15 years ago when I got married, as The Wife held the bike steady while it put it up on the paddock stands, and slid the axles home while I held everything in alignment.

The whole operation took about six hours, including switching out the sprockets, but then again I'm notably slow. The job was strictly no sweat. ;)
 

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i use a pair of tie-down straps from the garage rafters (i haven't bought a front stand yet)
Ha so I'm not the only one still hanging the bike from the rafters. I keep spending the spare cash on things like ohhh I don't know maybe the next generation GTRossi Mono Hugger :D

It is a form of ZEN meditation specially when the personal mod work starts!:)

.
 

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Wow, some of you guys work hard at this stuff.

Pit Bull rear stand, Pit Bull steering head stand, bike in the air and both wheels off in maybe 15 minutes. Probably less.

Putting the rear back on can be a bitch though, I'll admit that. Getting the axle lined up and through the swingarm and other bits is hard. But a little patience gets 'er done.

I don't take any special measures to avoid scratching things. Maybe if I cleaned the bike one of these days I would find out it was a total mess under all the dirt!
 

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OK guys i have changed wheels many times and i hated that rear wheel, it WAS a pain until i used wheel chokes, yeap those cheap ones. I put one in the front and one in the back of the tire, remove the axle then just push the wheel a bit then take chain and done. To put the tire in I do the same process, the chokes hold the wheel all the time, it is so much easier.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=96479
 

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I found rear wheel trading to be pretty simple, except that, yes, it isn't hard to screw up the spacers the first time. As above, you get over that.

The lever idea makes it super easy. I usually just shove my foot under the rear wheel to hold it up while putting the axle in or out. The wooden lever is much more elegant, but the foot works fine too. I too am doing this with a PitBull.

The only thing I found irritating about changing the rear wheel is having to adjust the chain and align the rear wheel. I'm spoiled from years of shaft-drive.

I agree with the point made above: if you find this process that difficult, you shouldn't really be doing any maintenance on your Ducati.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
If you find wheel removal to be a chore (images, notes?), you really shouldn't be doing any maintenance on your bike. Tom
I find nothing wrong with ensuring that the way I remove anything from a moto, is taken in the form of an image, in order to ENSURE that it's done right during re-assy. Take a simple step back from a simple thought: I'm not changing rear tires every weekend to have this procedure down, like anything else, nor do I approach a weekend project to compete with another tire shop. But kudos to you for being such a wiz on changing your tires. I actually became somewhat teary-eyed when you expressed with utter boringness, how your local tire guys are envious of you....awww

I didn't do the work to save a few bucks Tom, if it'll make you sleep any better at night, I did it because I knew I could do it. I stated I woulnd't do this again because for me I felt I kept feeling that if I only had another person holding up that rim assy, it could have made things easy(er). Me expressing that sure, it can be a bitch, doesn't merit that I shouldn't be working on my Ducati. What a lame comment. Let's not worry about who should be working on what, since you have it all figured out. MMMMK?

I agree with the point made above: if you find this process that difficult, you shouldn't really be doing any maintenance on your Ducati.
Oh god...
 

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Perhaps you missed our point. Rear wheel swapping is extremely easy compared to the more complex operations we talk about on the site all the time.

I can't speak for st2lemans, but I really was thinking of you and your bike, not trying to give you a hard time. If a person finds swapping rear wheels overly difficult or complicated, then most of the rest of the work on the bike should be avoided, as it takes far more expertise.

As far as images and notes, that's just good sense. I don't know why st2lemans saw that as something to pick at. Very simple things such as "was the brake hose on this side of this bracket, or the other side?" can be completely settled by having shot a couple digital photos before you begin. I know when I removed my evaporative canister, I shot and kept a photo of the hose routing, just in case I have to ever put it back on. I certainly won't remember years later how they were routed, and I just don't want to have to figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
To add to my intial sentiments, I think I really wrote it in the spirit of relief. Meaning that for ALOT of fellow members, it's really not as easy as some of the more seasoned fellows appear to make it be. You have to consider specific details about something that "sounds" like a 10 min. job:

Go out and look at your rear wheel set-up. You'll find that yes, you have a simple axle with a nut on the other end, a brake caliper resting on a disc, and a rear wheel with a chain on a sprocket. But you also have spacers on the inside of the swingarm, a tire that wants to fall if you don't place a 2x4 under it first or hold it up so that the axle or bearing don't get dmgd., a caliper not only resting on a disc, but resting itself also on a pin, which is part of the inner swingarm. And 2 arms on your body.

Sure, bravo and shit-tons of golf-claps to those who can do all of this with your tongue and no arms. But I still stand to say that the removal takes about ohh, 5-10 mins. But the reassy. isnt that easy (at least not for me). You have to carefully put everything back in it's place, use logic, and tape things off to keep that pretty Italian assy from scratching ANYTHING because afterall, it's a Ducati, and not another Honda.

And I still stand by saying to anyone that you KNOW if you had a buddy to help you out, it makes it all that easier. Plain and simple. Until you reach God like status, I personally never try to discount someone elses labor and experience in that labor. It's just plain rude and like the saying goes, easier said than done.

Not every single thing any of us work on will be soo easy. I take pride in being able to have confidence in approaching to do something on my own, on my own moto. I will think long and hard and make sure I can do it. And of course, I come online and research because I wasn't born at the Ducati factory nor have a degree in Ducatiology. So some things I feel I can do, some I know I can't.

Unless you're name is Tom, there's nothing wrong with thinking about other fellow forum members and expressing to them that although certain tasks appear and sound easy to do, take heed and have some patience or think about having a shop help you when you need it, if you can do it yourself or you feel it could not be worth your time. What's easy for some, may not be easy for others. I was simply expressing to those who might have to do this themselves (who've yet to do it), to know that it's not a "you put the water in the pot, you let it boil and you're done" kind of a job.

You have to look at the task ahead of you and cover all bases. Everything has to align, the chain goes on first, you have to hold or pry your tire up (which doesn't weigh 3 lbs) and slide the axle in without allowing the spacers to drop (use ties or duct tape) and make sure the caliper is seated properly without it coming off the nipple on the swingarm) or else it can fall onto your lovely rim because both hands are doing their work. What if the caliper comes off, what if this, what if that. Right? See what I mean? Perhaps someone can youtube this job in the approach of doing it with such finesse to either proove me crazy, or proove me right, that this will not be a 5 min. video without edits and certainly not without preperation.

I take'm on the chin, and I can still talk without a lisp.

Ricardo
 

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Premium Member
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To add to my intial sentiments, I think I really wrote it in the spirit of relief. Meaning that for ALOT of fellow members, it's really not as easy as some of the more seasoned fellows appear to make it be. You have to consider specific details about something that "sounds" like a 10 min. job:

Go out and look at your rear wheel set-up. You'll find that yes, you have a simple axle with a nut on the other end, a brake caliper resting on a disc, and a rear wheel with a chain on a sprocket. But you also have spacers on the inside of the swingarm, a tire that wants to fall if you don't place a 2x4 under it first or hold it up so that the axle or bearing don't get dmgd., a caliper not only resting on a disc, but resting itself also on a pin, which is part of the inner swingarm. And 2 arms on your body.

Sure, bravo and shit-tons of golf-claps to those who can do all of this with your tongue and no arms. But I still stand to say that the removal takes about ohh, 5-10 mins. But the reassy. isnt that easy (at least not for me). You have to carefully put everything back in it's place, use logic, and tape things off to keep that pretty Italian assy from scratching ANYTHING because afterall, it's a Ducati, and not another Honda.

And I still stand by saying to anyone that you KNOW if you had a buddy to help you out, it makes it all that easier. Plain and simple. Until you reach God like status, I personally never try to discount someone elses labor and experience in that labor. It's just plain rude and like the saying goes, easier said than done.

Not every single thing any of us work on will be soo easy. I take pride in being able to have confidence in approaching to do something on my own, on my own moto. I will think long and hard and make sure I can do it. And of course, I come online and research because I wasn't born at the Ducati factory nor have a degree in Ducatiology. So some things I feel I can do, some I know I can't.

Unless you're name is Tom, there's nothing wrong with thinking about other fellow forum members and expressing to them that although certain tasks appear and sound easy to do, take heed and have some patience or think about having a shop help you when you need it, if you can do it yourself or you feel it could not be worth your time. What's easy for some, may not be easy for others. I was simply expressing to those who might have to do this themselves (who've yet to do it), to know that it's not a "you put the water in the pot, you let it boil and you're done" kind of a job.

You have to look at the task ahead of you and cover all bases. Everything has to align, the chain goes on first, you have to hold or pry your tire up (which doesn't weigh 3 lbs) and slide the axle in without allowing the spacers to drop (use ties or duct tape) and make sure the caliper is seated properly without it coming off the nipple on the swingarm) or else it can fall onto your lovely rim because both hands are doing their work. What if the caliper comes off, what if this, what if that. Right? See what I mean? Perhaps someone can youtube this job in the approach of doing it with such finesse to either proove me crazy, or proove me right, that this will not be a 5 min. video without edits and certainly not without preperation.

I take'm on the chin, and I can still talk without a lisp.

Ricardo
I could have taken the wheel off and put it back on again in the time it took you to type that...
:)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I could have taken the wheel off and put it back on again in the time it took you to type that...
:)
Hahaha. You're underestimating how fast I type. What you see visually in length, is purely speculation in your time-frame count. Proove it by taping yourself changing your rear tire off an back on, in less than 5 mins...

:D
 
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