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I have my 98 ST-2 in the shop for valve adjustment and checking rear wheel bearings (I just replaced worn front bearing last summer). They just called to tell me the bearing fell right out, and was damaged enough it scored the rear wheel so it's no longer in spec. In other words I need a new rear wheel. I have never heard of this and had not noticed weird symptoms. That said, I have not been on it much lately b/c waiting to do the valve job.

I don't think they are pulling my leg or looking for more business, since they recommended I search elsewhere for a replacement. Getting it from them sounds like now around $7xx, down from $14xx with a recent part replacement.

Part number is either 50220172A (for the original $1400 one) or 50220171A for the $700 one. Shop says only compatibilities are 1997-2000 ST-2's and 1999 ST-4. eBay?

Ears open for suggestions please, and thank you!
 

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I have an ST2 wheel that did the same thing on one side. I used blue Locktite on the outer race to hub union and haven't had an issue for 20k miles. If it gets worse, I'll probably look into finding an over-sized bearing. The worse case would be to either have it bored out and sleeved or welded and re-machined.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have an ST2 wheel that did the same thing on one side. I used blue Locktite on the outer race to hub union and haven't had an issue for 20k miles. If it gets worse, I'll probably look into finding an over-sized bearing. The worse case would be to either have it bored out and sleeved or welded and re-machined.
Thank you. Meaning just dropping the standard bearing into place but securing it with Blue loctite?
 

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Green loctite is made just for this "Bearing retaining" it will take up to around .004 to press fit
 

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Some of the monsters with a double sided swing arm use the same rear wheel also.
 

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Its ashamed you're so far away I would give you a rear wheel. I just swapped out the ones on my ST4 for a light weight set
 

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Thank you. Meaning just dropping the standard bearing into place but securing it with Blue loctite?
Yes.


Green loctite is made just for this "Bearing retaining" it will take up to around .004 to press fit
Thanks for the info. Blue was all I had laying around, so I used it. I'll get the green stuff if I need to do/redo it, again. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all for the help. Now after picking up the bike I am really puzzled, so here comes a noob inquiry about chains...
Shop was not into loctite plan (didn't think they could stand by it), they just put it back together so I could pick it up. I am going to look for a replacement wheel and probably add loctite in the meantime if it's close enough to a tight fit.
When I left the shop I realized there seemed to be a slight grab with each rotation of the rear wheel at low speeds. I parked and put it on the center stand, and spinning the wheel I realize that at its tightest point the chain is tight enough to stop the wheel. I've always thought you adjust the chain based on its tightest part in the rotation, so I circled back to the shop thinking this was a big oversight or error.
The person who worked on my bike explained that he checks chain tension by pulling on the TOP and ensuring he has three quarters of an inch. I had never heard of this and mentioned that I usually spin to find the tight spot, then adjust to spec from there. He seemed not to get or agree that there should be a tighter zone in the chain, given that the sprockets are fixed points. ?? He indicated that's how he always adjusts chains, and that on other bikes the chain does not loosen and tighten when spinning. He related my tight spot/loose spot situation to the loose bearing, and reiterated advice to source a new wheel.
I drove home, but I'm thinking my chain is way tighter than I've ever adjusted it, and I'm super confused by this idea that "normal" chains don't have loose and tight spots. Maybe mine has a loose/tight range that's off/ I'm curious if this shop explanation makes sense, and also what others think is typical tension range, like when you tighten to spec at the tight spot, how much looser is it at the loose spot?
 

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Start with the "green locktite" It's called Stud & Bearing Mount, at least it used to be. Good Stuff.
Yes chains can get tight and loose points, not the best thing, time to replace. Your bearing issue may have a lot to do with it.
Find another shop, I am pretty sure the spec is 1 1/4" play in the chain at the middle of the run. You can't get it on the top if you have a chain guard.
I just sold an ST2 wheel for $100 plus shipping, and a 5spoke ST4s wheel for $350. Shop around, they are out there. I don't think I have another, but I will check. As stated some monsters and others will fit.
 

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The person who worked on my bike explained that he checks chain tension by pulling on the TOP and ensuring he has three quarters of an inch.
That sounds like total horseshit to me. I can't see how you could possibly do that with any degree of accuracy without removing the hugger.
Also the recommended free play with standard ride height settings is 32 - 34mm, so he's at least half an inch out to start with...
If you've raised the ride height you'll need even more free play.

You are right and the shop guy is wrong. Very wrong.
Chains always have, or at least develop as they get used, tight spots.
You are right too in that you say you find the tight spot and then adjust the chain accordingly at that point. In this instance, I would recommend that you in fact do that as soon as you can, otherwise you could also be looking at gearbox damage.

I'd be very wary about using the same shop again for anything that includes chain adjustment.
In fact you obviously know how to do it correctly yourself, so stick to doing that, and whatever else you can, yourself.
 

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Sounds like you need a new rear rim, chain, possibly new sprokets and definitely a new shop!

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Motorcycle.com App
 

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"I'd be very wary about using the same shop again for anything that includes chain adjustment"

I'd strongly second that , if a shop is not aware of this syndrome then they are not a shop I would want to use.

Even the measurement is irrelevant if taken at a different location.

Once located and adjusted at the 'tight spot' rotate until it reaches the 'loose' spot , if the slack is too much then its time to replace.

Its not uncommon to need to ditch a chain early because of this and is just bad luck.
 

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What other have said is completely right, stay away from there. I'm guessing it was that Seattle shop that everyone "raves" about. :rolleyes: LoL.

Have a good one.
 

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>>> put it on the center stand, and spinning the wheel I realize that at its tightest point the >>>chain is tight enough to stop the wheel. I've always thought you adjust the chain based >>>on its tightest part in the rotation, so I circled back to the shop thinking this was a big >>>oversight or error.

Those first 6 words above tell me that you need to RUN QUICKLY to a knowledgeable shop!
With the SA dropped, the chain should be loose in any position. Even in the tightest spot, that's where you need the specified slack!!! When you sit on the bike and use the travel, the chain GETS TIGHTER (when the 2 sprockets _ SA pivot are lined-up)
 
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