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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen lots of people post that they would gear down the front/rear sprocket on an 800/1000 ss to get quicker launching. My only question is: is there a difference between switching the front vs the rear? If you gear either down one tooth, isn't the end result the same? If so, is the front or rear easier to change if you want to DIY?
 

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one down front

I did one down in the front to help getting me out of the turns faster to keep up with the pack at the track.
 

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I believe these bikes are geared high to pass EPA noise requirements. I'm planning on going one down in the front (14t) and 2 up in the back (42t). I never use 6th gear, and rarely use 5th. This should make the gearbox much more useful. I'm not concerned with top speed...
 

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Old Wizard
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Rule of Thumb: If you go down one tooth on the front it's almost equivalent to going up three teeth in the rear. It's easier and cheaper to change the front sprocket because the smaller sprocket is less expensive and you don't have to buy a longer chain as you would if you add three to the rear.

Changing to a 14-tooth front is all you need here.
 

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front or rear?

2 X 4 or four times two gives the same results. Changing the front sprocket is quick and easy. No rear wheel to remove. I went from a 15 to a 14 in the front in minutes to make it more conducive for city driving, and I really liked the change.

If you have the equipment to change master links, this is also a good time to clean and apply new lubricant to your chain as well, because the change will necessitate it's being readjusted.
 

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Chilehead
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If the chain is done, change both.

If the chain is pretty new, anything goes.

I changed the rear to a 43 and added a few links after a couple hundred miles, currently at 16k miles and looking good.

On the other hand, on my ST2 I just went to a 14 front, then 14/43 at the next chain.

On my 999R I changed to 14/39, as that's what I could fir with the OEM chain, but will go to 15/43 when this one wears out (10k miles at the moment, and even the rear aluminum sprocket still looks like new, thanks to ScottOiler!)

Tom
 

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....is there a difference between switching the front vs the rear? If you gear either down one tooth, isn't the end result the same? If so, is the front or rear easier to change if you want to DIY?
15 to 14 front is 1/15th less. 38 to 39 rear is 1/38th more... There is a big difference...
 

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I only had 3000 miles on my 900SSie when i changed to a 14t front sprocket and the difference was great for around town fun.

I recently installed a new chain and new front/rear sprockets, but i decided to go back to a 15t front along with a 43t rear sprocket (original rear was a 40t). Absolutely no difference between the 14/40 combo and the new 15/43 combo, so a 14t front is definitely the way to go if you're just wanting a quick and easy ratio change. I believe the only downside that i've heard of with a 14t front sprocket is that it accelerates chain wear due to the chain's tighter turn radius on the the smaller sprocket, but who knows. :think:
 

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I have basically the same experience as Chuck. I was 14/40, but when I changed chain and sprockets, I also went 15/43 for the same reasons as Chuck mentions. Mine spins a little higher with the 15/43 than it did 14/40. If I had to guess, I'd say 1 front tooth equals about 2.5 rear teeth.
 

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i went down one tooth on the front due to price and ease of change compared to rear sprocket. makes city riding a bit nicer. raises rpms by about 500 for same speed as 15 tooth sprocket. allows the front wheel to lift without slipping the clutch. (power wheelie, from about 10 mph, crack open the throttle and up it goes) reduces top speed by 10 mph. (but seriously, how often does anyone ride at top speed??!) it does allow me to reach 140 mph (speedo indicated) much quicker than the stock sprocket.

my bike is almost 17 months old and has just over 17,000 miles on it. about 5,000 miles on the 14 tooth sprocket. i saved the original just in case i didnt like the new one, but never thought twice about changing back since.
 

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Chilehead
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I was under the impression that a smaller front sprocket created a tighter radius and accelerated chain wear.
Not enough to matter.

I typically get 20k miles on a chain set, and that is using aluminum rear sprockets.

The only ratios that are EXACTLY equal are 14/42=15/45, all others are only approximate.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the info guys!

Since I never approach top speed (I haven't been above 110), and I don't track the bike, it sounds like dropping one front tooth will get the result I'm looking for.

All my riding is street and I would just like the quicker takeoff so I'll probably tooth down 1 in the front and reassess the situation when it comes time to change both sprockets. I'm only at 2600 miles on the bike so the chain and sprocket change is not in the immediate future.

Great responses though, I really appreciate it!
 
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