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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm looking to replace my sprockets/chain as they're starting to get a little worn. I'm a little confused about changing the rear though as it's my first time doing it on an SSA bike. Almost everywhere I've looked only sells sprockets made to work with the quick change sprocket carriers. I don't need that ability and especially don't want to spend a couple hundred on the carrier itself. Can I not just get an OEM style sprocket and mount it using the existing hardware?
 

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In fact, I just completed an upgrade on my 796... I got the new carrier and quick change sprocket setup. Costwise, it's a wash, assuming you will replace your sprocket at least one more time, and... of course... it makes it much easier. I would also plan on replacing the cush-drive inserts; mine have about 11K miles on them and they are fairly trashed. I have the old sprocket, still, if you want pictures of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool thanks for the info. I finally found a sprocket that fits as an OEM replacement rather than the quick change and it costs about the same as a quick change carrier and sprocket so I guess I'll just go that route.

Do you use rubber or poly cush drives when you replaced yours?
 

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Cool thanks for the info. I finally found a sprocket that fits as an OEM replacement rather than the quick change and it costs about the same as a quick change carrier and sprocket so I guess I'll just go that route.

Do you use rubber or poly cush drives when you replaced yours?
I used the urethane ones, they came with the whole sprocket/chain combo package they worked up for me. In the little bit I've ridden it since I've installed it, I can tell they are a little less forgiving than the rubber ones, but I don't have to worry about deterioration. The one thing I did notice, and what drove me to pull the trigger in the first place, was the deflection of the factory sprocket with the worn rubber cush inserts... it was fairly wobbling around on the axle, and the chain was hitting the side of the tire.

That's what the parts guy said... the cost of the factory-style sprocket alone costs almost as much as the new carrier and QC sprocket. In the end, it probably doesn't make any difference, unless you track the bike and need to make quick sprocket changes. I suspect I'll have to change the sprocket once more, maybe twice, in the bike's lifetime.
 

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Single sided swingarm =SSA

I usually recommend the quick change route if you have any plans to play with gearing or simply keep the bike long term. The cost to convert to a quick change is almost the same as oem and some times a bit more THE FIRST TIME. After the first time you will be able to buy less expensive rear sprockets so the savings are on the second replacement, some tips on buying a quick change.

1. Know that most are proprietary pattern so buy a brand that should be around a while, if you buy a pattern that is no longer made or you simply cannot get you will need another carrier and then there is no benefit.

2. buy a brand that offers steel rear sprockets so you get longevity, aluminum can be cheaper but you may be getting 1/2 the life of steel.

3. make sure the cush drives are captured so the drive rubbers cannot shift into your hub if they become disconnected, you will damage the hub without knowing if this happens. Most aftermarket carriers have tabs to prevent this.

4. I use 90% oem cush drives with no issues, the urethane ones are nice but are not needed.

If you decide Not to go the quick change route look at supersprox for a oem type replacement. Oem may be the longest lasting but at the highest cost.

Good luck,
 

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sprocket center used to have std style sprockets, but they don't list them anymore. i'm sure afam made some.

metalgear in au have some esjot ones that are by far the cheapest i've come across, but they're not the prettiest.
 

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... quick change sprocket setup. Costwise, it's a wash, assuming you will replace your sprocket at least one more time, and... of course... it makes it much easier.
I never got the "quick change" thing. In fact I think it's faster doing a regular sprocket as you only have one big nut to undo and torque back versus 6? smaller nuts.


If you decide Not to go the quick change route look at supersprox for a oem type replacement. Oem may be the longest lasting but at the highest cost.
Supersprox are top quality and last longer than oem in my experience.
 

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I never got the "quick change" thing. In fact I think it's faster doing a regular sprocket as you only have one big nut to undo and torque back versus 6? smaller nuts.
No... you still have to disassemble the sprocket from the OEM carrier... so 1 big bolt and 5 small ones, unless you can pull the sprocket off past the cush drives. My thought on the OEM cush drives are... after 10K miles, mine needed replacement anyway, so you are back to disassembling the whole thing. The QC idea is to leave the carrier on the bike and just remove the sprocket with the 5 smaller bolts you can probably zap on and off with a ratchet or impact gun quickly. It does make sense.
 

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Also, for the record... the 796 has a special offset countershaft sprocket, it is not the same as the others. Make sure it's the correct sprocket!
 
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