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Discussion Starter #1
When I bought my SS I bought it from a guy that was atleast 275lbs. Big guy to say the least, one of the first things he said was, you should definatly adjust the suspension for someone your size (155lbs). im just now getting myself in gear to actually start modifying the bike cause since I bought the bike I havent had funds, or time to work on it really. So what should I be doing to set it up for myself? If at the same time I can lower the bike it would help, im 5'7 and its not a huge deal, but it'd be nice to stop and be on my heel instead of toes. If its down to performance and being on my toes, ill do that. If I can have both that would be my preference.

Thanks in advance for any advice and tips.

Thanks guys



I would assume im going to be cranking on the gear looking nut there. im lost when it comes to adjusting suspension.
 

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i would not lower the bike, as long as you can tip-toe with at least one foot.

if you want to adjust the suspension on your bike, take a look at the front
too, not just the rear shock.

what you are looking at with your pic, is the spring pre-load adjustment
screws of the rear shock only, one is to pre-load the spring, the other
is for locking the first one in place.
spring pre-load adjustment can be done to the fork to, with the big hex
head screws on top of each fork leg.

with the pre-load adjustment, you are setting sag only, you need to
touch the damping adjustment screws too, they are located near the top
of the rear shock, and on top of the fork legs ( little copper slot screws ).

rebound damping has to be adusted accordingly, those screws are to
be found on the bottom of each fork leg, the re-bound damping on the
shock is adjusted by the turnable plastic ring near the bottom of the
shock, just above its lower mounting eye.



you start with setting the sag, do some re-search on this forum, there
have been nice essays written about that.

i can't find my copy now, as i am on my "new" computer, the info
is on the old one still.

---

what i found out with buying several ducati supersports now:

80% of the europeans ride around with mal-adjusted suspensions,
none of the SS1000DS users had made any use of the length-adjustable
Öhlins shock, nor where any of the other settings right on most of the
bikes.

front stiff as hell, rear shock all the way in and pretty soft,
its a chopper, baby.

:think: ;)
 

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For a start go through your owner's manual and set the suspensions to their standard settings to get a feel about how it is when it comes out of the factory. Then set the sag for your weight (including riding gear) and you'll see how better it gets ;).

You'll find loads of information about setting up the suspension. If you want to better understand how suspension works, once you set the sag, have a play with compression and rebound damping. Set both as soft as it gets (front and rear) and go for a ride on a road you know. When you stop take some notes about how it feels (a couple of lines will do). Then set, lets say, compression all the way in (hardest possible) on one side only (either front or rear). Go down that road again and take notes about how it feels this time. Before you are off again, set compression all the way out (softest) and rebound all the way in (hardest). Down that road again. Repeat with the rear.

When you are done (it takes some time - you might not finish with both sides on a single ride, that's why you'll take notes ;)) you'll have a better understanding how each setting affects the bike's behaviour. You can then set rebound and compression to the middle and start from there in order to find the best setting for your riding style.


Sorry for the long (and maybe complicated) post :p:cool:
 

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insane suggestions here, Mr. Engakats. :rolleyes: :crazy: ;)

he should just set the sag, have the compression damping set
somewhere between half and 2/3 closed from zero, depending
on riding preferences, have the re-bound closed step by step,
that the bike's rear isn't bouncing too much, and be fine with it.

there is no need to ride around with somewhat dangerous
suspension settings of which one know they won't work at all.

:think:


:)
 

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The only reason I "suggested" the above is only for him to better understand how suspensions work and what each setting's role is. I never said him to go out on the streets flat out with the bike behaving like a boat.

Anyway, each to his own... :)
 

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Or, just spend $40 at your local suspension shop and have them twiddle you knobs. Its the best $40 upgrade you can imagine, and will get you a lot closer to the ideal setting than it would take a novice 6 months of twiddling.

They will start with the sag front and back, then adjust your compression and rebound damping, and take a look at your bike overall for suspension. Worth every penny.

Cheers,
 

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you start with setting the sag, do some re-search on this forum, there
have been nice essays written about that.

i can't find my copy now, as i am on my "new" computer, the info
is on the old one still.

i am on my old computer atm, so here comes what
i have copied from this board, nice write up:




On the front fork, the slotted brass screws on the very top adjust rebound damping, the hex nuts just below those slotted screws adjust the preload and the compression damping is adjusted from the bottom of each fork leg, with a straight screwdriver. The owner's manual gives the standard factory settings as:
- On both the rebound/compression, start by turning the screws clockwise until they stop, then turn each counterclockwise, 7 clicks for rebound (14 clicks out total) and 11 clicks for compression (16 clicks total).
- Preload is adjusted by turning the top hex nuts (clockwise for more, the opposite for less).

You really should set "sag" first, then start with the factory settings. Sag....Distance a motorcycle compresses with weight on it. There are two types of sag we deal with. The first is "free" (static) sag, which is the amount the springs compress under the weight of the bike. The second is rider sag, which is the amount the springs compress with the rider on board.

Preload....This is the amount a spring is compressed with no weight on it at all.


BASELINE SETUP:
At this point, we're finally going to do some measuring and adjusting. We will use a known working baseline to set up your chassis. Then the next time you practice, you will be able to analyze how it works and fine tune it to work even better. All suspension adjustments made by pushing or bouncing on the bike should be made with the bike off the stands, on level ground, and with the bike in neutral.

Rear Shock....The first and most basic adjustment is to set the sag on the shock. When you make these measurements, accuracy is important. If at all possible, use a metric tape measure with millimeter increments. If you use an S.A.E. tape, then measure to the sixteenth of an inch (1" = 25.4mm). You need to pick two fixed points on the rear of your bike for this. One on the rear of the swingarm (like a stand spool or the axle), and one on the sub frame (like one of the bolts that holds the rear passenger pegs on. never use the bodywork since it can sag when the rider gets on). Before you can measure the sag, you must first find the fully extended measurement between your two points. Have a friend help you by pulling up on the footpegs to fully extend the rear suspension. Your bike may be fully extended already. If it is, this is not a problem. Record the distance at "full extension" on your log sheet. Now have your friend balance the bike for you and push down on the seat several times to settle the suspension. Now measure and record the distance between your two points again. This is your static sag. There should definitely be a little static sag on the rear shock. Most expert race bikes have 5-10mm static sag. Your next measurement is rider sag. Have a friend stand at the front of your bike and balance it by the ends of the handlebars. Sit on the bike like you would ride it and bounce down on it three times to settle the suspension. Now have another friend measure between your two points for you and log the measurement in the log. This is your rider sag. Next you need to subtract your rider sag measurement from your full extension measurement. This is your rear sag measurement. You should have 30mm of sag. This is your baseline setting and can be adjusted after your test ride. If your spring tops out the bike, you will need a stiffer spring.

Now we need to adjust the damping. The object is to get the suspension to respond as quickly as possible to irregularities in the pavement. Damping is required to control the movement of the wheel and the spring. Set your rebound damping adjuster first. It is difficult to explain how it should appear in words, but as you push on the seat, it should return quickly, but not instantaneously. It should take approximately one second for it to return to the top from a hard push. You should be able to watch the seat rise. If it just pops back up right away, you need to add rebound. If it drags up slowly, loosen it up. If you have a compression adjuster, sit it up in the middle. You can determine how to adjust it after your initial test ride, too hard loosen it up, and to soft add.


Front Forks....Start here by setting the sag on the fork the same way you did on the shock. First you need a fully extended measurement. Only way to get consistency is to have two guys pick up on the handlebars until the front wheel leaves the ground slightly. Measure the exposed area of the fork slider. On a conventional fork, this will be from the bottom of the lower triple tree to the top of the dust seal on the slider. For an inverted fork, this will be from the dust seal down to the top edge of the aluminum axle clamp. Record this measurement on your log sheet. Push down on the fork hard three times, to settle the suspension. Now measure the static sag. Finally, get on the bike and push down three more times, while a friend balances the bike. Have your friend with the tape take the final measurement. The measurement you are looking for on the front fork is 35mm. If your spring is of the correct rate, the free sag should be about 65 percent of the rider sag, or about 20mm. The front fork has to have a great deal of free sag so that the front wheel may move down into a hole as well as over a bump. If your fork has too much sag turn the preload adjuster in. If you don't have preload adjusters, then you will have to remove your fork spacers and cut longer preload spacers. Adjust in 10mm increments. When you get close, you can go to 5mm increments.


:)
 

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Spend the $40.00 to get it all sorted out. they'll explaint it to you anyways. you'll LEARN and get PRO INPUT for sure. You'll get a firm grasp and not have to be confused.
 

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You may think about a different shock spring. A 275lb. rider on a 160lb rider spring, is not a good thing. Maybe the spring is not what it should be anymore. How many miles on this bike? Just a thought.
 

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You may think about a different shock spring. A 275lb. rider on a 160lb rider spring, is not a good thing. Maybe the spring is not what it should be anymore. How many miles on this bike? Just a thought.
Yes, this was my first thought when I read the difference between the two riders' weights. If the previous owner installed a spring for his weight, then you are going to want to replace the spring with one appropriate for your weight. If the original spring is on the bike, keep winding out the preload to see if you can get the sag numbers you want/need.

As others have said, for the initial set up, it really is worth it, if you have the money, to have a suspension person get your baseline for you.

The good news is, at your weight, the stock springs in the forks just might work fine. Now, if the previous owner replaced those for his weight, well...you'll be looking at a new set of springs, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
He was about 275 im about 170 with gear. He never mentioned changing the spring, it looks factory. I bought it from him with 12k on it, I now have 19,800 i think. It never handled badly in my opinion, but if its got some hidden potential, that'd be great.
 

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When I bought my SS I bought it from a guy that was atleast 275lbs. Big guy to say the least, one of the first things he said was, you should definatly adjust the suspension for someone your size (155lbs). im just now getting myself in gear to actually start modifying the bike cause since I bought the bike I havent had funds, or time to work on it really. So what should I be doing to set it up for myself? If at the same time I can lower the bike it would help, im 5'7 and its not a huge deal, but it'd be nice to stop and be on my heel instead of toes. If its down to performance and being on my toes, ill do that. If I can have both that would be my preference.

Thanks in advance for any advice and tips.

Thanks guys



I would assume im going to be cranking on the gear looking nut there. im lost when it comes to adjusting suspension.
http://www.sportrider.com/suspension_settings/146_suggested_suspension_settings/ducati.html
My advise would be to get it as close to stock as you can. Being in Iowa, you may be a long way from a Ducati shop to do it for you. At 155/170 lbs stock setting should be close for you. I'm sure your bike is breathing a sigh of relief when you got on it. Most folks buy a bike and never tweak settings. Change fork oil right off. Check out the link above and work around. Take a look at the nuts and see if you can notice any tell tale marks in the castle nuts from adjustment. They look oxidized in the pic. I'd give them a careful shot of WD40 before you start and let it set over night. Put a rag around the shock so nothing drips on the tires. Don't get too screwed up over it. Once you get it, you're done.

He was about 275 im about 170 with gear. He never mentioned changing the spring, it looks factory. I bought it from him with 12k on it, I now have 19,800 i think. It never handled badly in my opinion, but if its got some hidden potential, that'd be great.
Nice bike, by the way. Again, it sounds like the large fellow never touched the thing to me. You may be closer than you think. If you have a mechanical aptitude, you can send your forks out and get them "modernized" and send the shock out to have it set to your size and riding style. That's the fun of having a Ducati: it acts like a real bike and they are fun & easy to work on (other than valves/belts). Have fun!
 

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Belts are easy....but has anybody had any difficulty actually getting a wrench in to adjust preload? How the heck do you get wrench around the preload collars and actually move it without hitting the frame? I need to jack my back end up a bit as it sags a little too much and I can't seem to get a good angle with the wrench.
 
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