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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Can someone explain the function of the rod that goes from the rear brake to the engine case on older Supersports? I am having to figure a different way to brace the rear brake bracket on my 2002 and I noticed this rod on the older bikes. I can see that the swing arm, the brake bracket, the rod and the engine case forms a parallelogram such that the brake position changes as the suspension moves up and down, but don't know what effect that would have on handling under braking. Anyone know?
 

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we say "Bremsmomentabstützung" to that rod
that connects the rear brake with the engine case.

:rolleyes:

if you don't have one, the forces of the applied
rear brake will be lead into the swingarm, resul-
ting in a stiffening of your rear suspension.

the rod leads the brake forces to the engine case,
allowing the rear suspension to work properly still,
which becomes advantageous once the road isn't
even especially.

:think: :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
we say "Bremsmomentabstützung" to that rod
that connects the rear brake with the engine case.

:rolleyes:

if you don't have one, the forces of the applied
rear brake will be lead into the swingarm, resul-
ting in a stiffening of your rear suspension.

the rod leads the brake forces to the engine case,
allowing the rear suspension to work properly still,
which becomes advantageous once the road isn't
even especially.

:think: :)
Thanks, that's very helpful. I'm trying to visualize how it would work. I can see that the rod would substantially reduce jacking of the rear suspension under braking because the effective lever arm is so long and working against the mass of the engine case. I wonder why this feature is not on Superbikes and later Supersports.
 

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I wonder why this feature is not on Superbikes and later Supersports.
i was thinking about that the other day, and came
to the conclusion that the superbikes with their
link-suspension system probably do not need it.

don't know why the later supersports and bikes
like the Millona came without one.

:think:
 

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the caliper mounting plate is the same, you just
have to grind off the front part that attaches to
the swingarm.
the rod's engine mount may be fabricated out of
an aluminum piece at home, remains the road and
its linkages, i bet you can found those at a hot rod
shop.

:think:

or you buy the complete assembly on ebay, but
they sell rather expensive.

:think:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
the caliper mounting plate is the same, you just
have to grind off the front part that attaches to
the swingarm.
the rod's engine mount may be fabricated out of
an aluminum piece at home, remains the road and
its linkages, i bet you can found those at a hot rod
shop.

:think:

or you buy the complete assembly on ebay, but
they sell rather expensive.

:think:
Thanks Muschi, I was thinking of doing all that, thanks for the support. I can get rod ends at a racing supply shop, the rod I can fabricate, of course I can modify the oem bracket too. I just thought I might be easier to just by the goods and bolt them up... There is a complication with the brake M/C though, since it mounts in the same place as the bracket for this brake rod. When I get some time I'll investigate further, do some measurements, etc. The brake caliper bolt is an M8, so no problem getting a rod end that size, just don't know what the other end is going to look like yet... Thanks again!
 

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if you fabricate the front support from steel, you
could do it rather thin, lets say 4mm, and have
it mounted beneath the master cylinder without
any worries.

pic from google filed under "ducati Bremsmomentabstützung" :)

 

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There were 2 on ebay last week. I think Ducati Depot had them.
 

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Keep in mind that the caliper mount has to be able to float on the axle and the stock bracket is captive when the axle is tight.The advantage gained by a floating brake is very slight unless you do a lot of hard braking on rough surfaces.For strength and security a 10mm or 3/8" rod end should be used.
 

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The OEM unit came with two steel shims that fit around the bracket and kept it from being pinched when the axle nuts were tightened.

On the down side, I saw what happened during a track day when the lock nut on one of the heim joints (or maybe both) came loose, causing the rod to become disconnected.

jD
 

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Discussion Starter #12
if you fabricate the front support from steel, you
could do it rather thin, lets say 4mm, and have
it mounted beneath the master cylinder without
any worries.

pic from google filed under "ducati Bremsmomentabstützung" :)

Wow, that's really trick. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The OEM unit came with two steel shims that fit around the bracket and kept it from being pinched when the axle nuts were tightened.

On the down side, I saw what happened during a track day when the lock nut on one of the heim joints (or maybe both) came loose, causing the rod to become disconnected.

jD
Thanks, I'm learning that this is a little more complicated than I realized.
 

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what is the english name for that part by the way ? :think:
 

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Reaction rod no 877.1.044.1b (from ducati partlist)

Caliper holder plate 825.1.011.1a

Plate 827.1.081.1a (plate on cranckcase)

Ball joint 764.010.014


These parts are not cheap. (a complete new set will cost here in Europe about 300 euros)
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Reaction rod no 877.1.044.1b (from ducati partlist)

Caliper holder plate 825.1.011.1a

Plate 827.1.081.1a (plate on cranckcase)

Ball joint 764.010.014


These parts are not cheap. (a complete new set will cost here in Europe about 300 euros)
Wow, that much? This is the price for the oem parts? Dang. I got a used set from a member here, so I got a good deal. I bet those fancy ones are really expensive new.... You'd think these bikes really were Ferrari's based on the prices for parts alone....

It looks like I'm going to have a very unique "Sport" pretty soon. First is the 4.5" rear wheel, now the brake rod from an earlier Supersport, and also the JMC swing arm... and a custom exhaust with a single carbon fiber muffler on the LEFT side... I've got to save up for the C/F fuel cell now...

I looked around and I could not find a 4.5" after market rear wheel for my bike. OEM is the only thing available as far as I can tell...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I see that these rods are used on bicycles with articulated rear suspensions. That's very interesting to me...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It's installed! A 2002 Sport is not supposed to have a floating rear caliper, but it does now! :D





I made a simple plate out of mild steel that goes behind the rear master cylinder support bracket. It extends all the way forward so that both brake bolts go through the plate. I used a longer 10 mm bolt for the bracket. The plate is painted white. The carbon fiber rod barely clears the oem 170 series tire, so it's a good thing I'm installing a 4.5" wheel with a 160 tire instead. The exhaust is going to be changed so that it is just has a single muffler on the LEFT side, to get the heat away from the brake and brake rod. I bought the rod ends from Pegasus Racing. I had to put it at least partly together to take it to my welder for the custom exhaust.
 
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