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Discussion Starter #1
As the title asks, why is the right side of the clutch slave directly opposite the front sprocket left exposed? It seems really odd to me to because all the dirt and grime from the sprocket ends up inside the clutch slave which can't be good for the piston and seals. However, I know there must a reason right?
 

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cheap, easy to assemble. look at the 2001> slave, it's a more complicated piece.

dirty fluid is the biggest issue ime. if the bellows is there, and the fluid is changed regularly (yearly) the old slaves are fine.
 

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I understood it was better to remove the bellows as it traps gunk and wears the seal.
There’s always one, isn’t there?
 

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i'd have the bellows to keep the crap off the pushrod - so the crap doesn't get into the back of the slave piston and wear the pushrod shorter, or get into the bore in the alt cover or cases. not sure it's a big issue either way - i see quite a lot of bikes without them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the replies guys. What bellows are you referring to? In the OEM and aftermarket clutch slaves I have seen the housing doesnt completely encircle the piston, leaving a section exposed, see pics.
1000268
clutch slave.jpeg
1000269
cnc racing.jpg
 

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It would make the part easier to make without the gap so I assume there is a reason I have never considered. All years and versions I can think of have the gap so it is either important for some reason or everyone simply copies the original without knowing why. I see both being very good possibilities.

In 2001 the company created a slave that did not have a place for leaking fluid to go so it would fill the clutch slave on the wrong side of the slave and lock up the lever solid. The temporary fix was to grind or cut a path for the clutch fluid to escape and the replacement parts since have had a weep hole.

I always use a rubber bellows on pre 2001 bikes if possible, not because I believe it will keep chain lube out of the slave though. I like it there as a canary in the coal mine as leaking glycol clutch fluid will cause the rubber to swell and if you find a swollen or damaged bellows from the chain hitting it you have a real good chance your slave is leaking. This allopws you to catch and fix the leaking slave before it gets real bad and you have clutch issues or no paint left on your cases.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It would make the part easier to make without the gap so I assume there is a reason I have never considered.
EXACTLY. There must a reason right? Seems really odd to my simple mind that Ducati would choose to potentially expose the internals of the clutch slave to all the gunk and dirt being thrown off by the front sprocket.
 

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If you have a 2001 and later the o-ring is your protection.
pre 2001 it was the bellows.

Either case is has not been a issue even with nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you have a 2001 and later the o-ring is your protection.
pre 2001 it was the bellows.

Either case is has not been a issue even with nothing.
Understood but why even have that cutout at all??? There must be some purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
what cutout are you talking about?
What I mean is that when looking at the clutch slave installed on the bike, the right side has a section where the piston and push rod is completely exposed to the front sprocket and chain.
 
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