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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm on a real tight budget but have a few bucks & i'd like to try anything to improve the front end on the old SP..Given the choice between fitting the Racetech springs or the Gold valves..which would likely be the best to go for?
I already rebuilt them & ended up using the Silkolene 5w stuff. btw they are showa adjustable rebound/comp models
 

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I did both.. Big diff!!
 

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The springs sort of depend on you. If you can get the correct sag the springs may be ok for you. In that case the money would be bet spent on valving. The springs must be correct before you start modifying the valving. The only exception on the springs would be a case where you can get the correct amount of sag but Ducati likes to use progressive wound springs. Personally I hate them and feel much better on straight wound springs.


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This will be sort of half useful. You can mod your forks using GSXR internals quite cheaply. In theory this mod will give you upgraded damping circuits. I heard good things from a thread on this chat you can look up, just a few months ago. I did this mod, it was cheap and easy, I still had to buy springs anyway and installed new seals. The bad half of the story is I have no useful info about how we'll they work, as I did it after winter started and haven't ridden yet. Look it up, it's something to consider. The big plus to me was that the forks are still completely adjustable externally, gold valves I don't believe are. You should end up with forks that work just like the ones on a GSXR, which I was told is much better than SP forks.
 

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Like DucMan said, getting the correct sag setting is the most important. I just put Racetech springs in my '96 two weeks ago and the difference is dramatic. I was surprised to see progressive springs in there. Not just a few coils either. I'd guess the tighter wound section (the "progressive" part) was over 40% of the total spring length. The bike felt like it would just fall thru the first 1 1/2" of travel when coming off the sidestand. Basically, I only had half of my front suspension. And that was at max preload. Now it feels right.

The adjustable Showas are pretty good forks as they are. On the street, oil type and level are easily as important as valving.
 

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Let me say this about the stock springs: I have heard that the progressive rate is 65/85. Since I was changing mine anyway, I didn't bother to calculate it out. But I did calculate the travel available on the lower rate portion. It's actually less than an inch. So , if you're not really light you should be able to preload most of the lower rate right out of the equation. If you compress any progressive or dual rate spring, watch it and you will notice the lower rate spring section will collapse first, turning it in to a spacer. To save money, you could even add a spacer to the spring if necessary to get the proper sag. Most of the travel will still be available. Springs are a hundred bucks, and I understand not having spare cash. Spending time setting your forks up as best you can with fresh oil will still be a noticeable improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone..as always some great insights & invaluable advice..
I'm going to hold out & get both springs & valves i think ..& do it all at once
 

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Thanks everyone..as always some great insights & invaluable advice..
I'm going to hold out & get both springs & valves i think ..& do it all at once
Thats what I did....And well worth the wait!! And if you do the Rear it will be like a New Bike!
 

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Let me say this about the stock springs: I have heard that the progressive rate is 65/85. Since I was changing mine anyway, I didn't bother to calculate it out. But I did calculate the travel available on the lower rate portion. It's actually less than an inch. So , if you're not really light you should be able to preload most of the lower rate right out of the equation. If you compress any progressive or dual rate spring, watch it and you will notice the lower rate spring section will collapse first, turning it in to a spacer. To save money, you could even add a spacer to the spring if necessary to get the proper sag. Most of the travel will still be available. Springs are a hundred bucks, and I understand not having spare cash. Spending time setting your forks up as best you can with fresh oil will still be a noticeable improvement.
in my 41mm non adj showa currenly fitted to my m750 i have cut down std srpings from something, not sure if they're monster or ss, possibly the same. with the close ssection cut off they tested at 0.83 from memory.

i just cut them, then heated the cut end to bend and close it then ground the end flat like a std spring.

i recall a suspension person telling me that a dual or progressive spring that has used up its softer section will feel harsher than a single rate spring even if the rate is similar. possibly due to the preload required and the fact that the whole springs is compresed somewhat by the extra preload. dunno now.
 

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Yes, right. There will be a little less travel available as far as spring travel goes. May feel a bit harsher on big bumps. Ideally, spring travel available should exceed fork leg available travel by a bit, and if they don't , they will be harsher on rough roads. I was surprised that my Racetech springs still required quite a bit of spacer, but I assume they took total travel available in to consideration.
 

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the travel won't change, that's set by the maximum cartridge length. you just preload the springs as required using longer spacers. on things with adj preload 10mm is a good start, if not 15 - 20mm.
 

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Brad, I guess I didn't explain well. I just meant coil bind should not be the limiting factor. Ideally ther should be spring travel left when the fork tube or cartridge runs out of mechanical travel, or harshness will result prematurely as rate builds. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
 
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