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Discussion Starter #1
Ciao,
I just bought my first set of Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa's and had them loose mounted.
There is an enormous amount of weight on the rear rim and then I noticed that the red dot is at the same point as my valve stem.
I believe the red dot is supposed to be opposite the valve stem for proper balancing. Am I correct? Please let me know, before I put the rear rim back on the bike. If I am correct, I will take the rim back, and ask them to properly mount and balance the tire.

Thanks in advance,
Noelle
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the dot should be at the valve stem, not across from it

btw how much weight are we talking here?
1 3/4 oz... more than I am used to seeing. It is an SC3 - Med compound rear. I have an SC2 for the front.

Thanks!
Noelle
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes. They are 1/4 oz each or 7grams.
And there are 7 of them.
 

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Balancing Tires & Rims

The red dot on tires indicate the lightest point. (Also, note the directional arrow.)

Almost everyone balances their wheels/tires incorrectly.

This unfortunate practice dates back to the steel spoke wheel days when wheels were actually much better balanced than they are today.

Before mounting a new tire, you should determine the 'true' heavy spot on the wheel. It's almost never next to the tire valve.

It is just as likely to be opposite the valve, which means you will be placing the lightest place on the tire (red dot) right next to the lightest spot on the wheel. You would probably be just as accurate if you throw the tire on the rim any old place and balanced it out with weights later.

I have found that placing the lightest spot on the tire adjacent to the heaviest spot on the wheel gives a smoother ride at all RPM's as well as using fewer and lighter balance weights. Just place the wheel (only) on the balancer first and mark the rim's heavy spot with permanent ink. Then align the tire's red dot with your wheel's new mark. I mark both sides of the rim to avoid accidentally wiping off these marks when mounting the tire. These marks can easily be wiped off with almost any solvent later.

You can mark the inside of the rims to eliminate the need to balance them again in the future.

One warning, most dealers won't know what you're talking about, and probably won't believe you anyway. Bad habits are hard to break, plus, they will probably show you a service manual clearly showing the tire valve being used as the wheel-to-tire alignment mark.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you, thank you, thank you...oh wise one! :)
I love your posts, btw.
Ciao,
Noelle
 

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Discussion Starter #8
damn I really must have had a long day I was thinking in grams instead of ounces, sorry bout that
No worries. Thank you for your quick replies and assistance!
 

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How do you know the lightest spot on the tire?

Figuring out the heaviest spot on the wheel is a piece of cake, but unless you can spin the tire without mounting it, how do you know?
Hopefully the manufacturer is close in their marking of the red dots, yellow dots whatever. Michelin doesn't mark their tires, claiming they are so well balanced it's not necessary... So it's a case of 'trust me' with them. Haven't had a problem to date. Dave
 

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Hopefully the manufacturer is close in their marking of the red dots, yellow dots whatever. Michelin doesn't mark their tires, claiming they are so well balanced it's not necessary... So it's a case of 'trust me' with them. Haven't had a problem to date. Dave
Michelin do mark them, but not with a dot, but rather a very small barcode on the bead of the tyre.....

MF
 
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