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I have 400 miles on my new ST3s. I have (reluctantly) been keeping it under 600 rpm, and varying engine speeds as recommended by Ducati. An extremely knowledgable Ducatista recommended that I begin driving it all out at this point. Ducati's break in recs being far to conservative. I relish the thought of this, but am interested in a consensus opinion.

thnx
 

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I did what you are doing for 500mi and then I just rode it like I owned it for a while. Some dealers have said that it is better to ride it towards the wild side than to baby it. Of course that is highly subjective isnt it?

Dave Harhay
 

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I would start taking it *to* "red line" through the gear box on occasion, especially when climbing hills, as well as varying the revs. I was advised to keep the revs up over 3K as it was more important during break-in not to lug the engine as opposed to watching high revs. If you've ever read the "moto-man" method of breaking in a racing engine, you'd feel comfortable with reving it up. I'd start riding it like I stole it after 1000-1200 miles. YMMV.
 

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Ride it like you would normally!

Just don't lug it below 3k as noted above. I wouldn't flog it to death, but it won't hurt it to drive it normally. Manufacturer's limitations are to cover their axx.
 

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As soon as you leave the dealership... find the nearest rural/wide open area - and wring it's neck. Get it as hot and bothered as possible, learn the finer points of the rev limiter. Watch the corners on the new tires! Then park it for an hour... let it cool all the way down.

Then warm it up and do it again. Then when you get it home 50 - 75 miles later... change the oil and ride it. It's broken in. That's pretty much what I've done to every bike I've left the shop with... and my bikes' motors are perfect. Engines like to be exercised!


OY! I replied to another break-in thread... sorry Mom.



:)
 

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I think you will be just fine breaking in the engine verbatim to the manufactures suggestions. I think their engineers have thought the process out well enough to give proper break-in procedure and- unless you have extensive experience with breaking down engines, access to dyno's, do compression and leak down tests, etc. to prove your theories- you are somewhat speculating when you vary from it. However, it doesn't mean you can't agree with another educated opinion on the matter.

Interesting timing as Motorcyclist (pg. 154 April 2006) just printed an article on engine break-in. Here is a paraphrased version of what they said:

--A tech who preps Japanese manufactures fleet of magazine test bikes suggests first to fill the fuel up completely to dissolve the anti-corrosive inside the tank in a large batch of solution. As the anti-corrosive filters through the fuel system is washes it w/o gumming up carbs or throttle bodies.

Next, contrary to manufactures suggestions of progressive increases in rpm, he states "You want to put a good load on the motor to seat the piston rings." Build heat in the motor by rev'ing it hard puts pressure on the rings to seat them effectively, the most important part of break-in. Slowly bring the motor to redline going through the gears using the motors torque. Accelerate and decelerate, upshift and downshift throughout the ride. Don't use steady throttle and don't sit at idle as they don't load the engine.

Also, let the oil circulate through the engine well before putting it in gear. This ensures proper lubrication of the major components. Let the engine go through heat cycles. Shut the engine down and let if cool completely to aid in the mating process.

Do this for the first 600 miles and you are done.--

I think manufactures would put themselves at serious liable risk if they put anywhere in their recommendations to "take the bike to redline" which is maybe why they use progressive rpm increases instead of loading the motor. Think about it, a first time motorcycle rider taking his new gixxer 1000 to redline! Can you say "lawsuit"? Just speculating on that of course but it seems like it could be a factor.

Anyway, based on this article, break-in can be a lot less excruciating. I think that is how I will do my next new bike.
 

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Drive it spirited, just don't lug the engine below 3K. Babying it too much may cause the rings NOT to seat. A few full throttle pulls to about 6K or so do the rings justice.
Don't flog it, just ride it with zest!
 

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I like the take it rev limiter attitude, but watch out for Mr. police man because you will be going so fast, the wheel will come up in first gear and on a cold day in Wis. in second gear. BTY that one scared the ----out of me.
Bruce 05 ST3
 

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I always follow the manufactures recomdations as hard as it is. Back in my m/x days I always followed the time consuming routine of breaking in my 2-stroke, but in the end I always had one of the strongest running bikes. I like to think the manufacture knows best. Becides, even at only 6000-7000 rpm the ST is putting out some good power.
 
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