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So I'm currently in the process of painting my 999 track bike to replicate the 04 Fila. Removed all the bits from the wheels in order to have them powder-coated (red/blue).

However, my mechanic and myself are unable to remove the rear (rubber) cush drive bushings that houses the rear sprocket.
When I powder-coat that rear wheel will those rubber cushions be damaged from the heat? I don't think they are removable :think:

TIA
 

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They need to be removed and replaced. They cost about $20 each. It sucks. I had mine powder coated and the rubber shrunk and 4 out of the 5 would pull right out leaving the inner steel liner. A machine shop needs to drill 'em out so new ones can be hammered in. Good luck.
 

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Yeah, absolutely, they need to come out. Surprised your mechanic doesn't know that already...or how to remove them. Different powder setups use different heat settings but they'll shrink or melt. The guy I use, for example, puts parts in an even hotter oven and melts all the paint off of parts first before sandblasting to start with a clean bare surface. You could almost burn bones in that thing...lol
 

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I relaced the wheels on my Sport Classic and while I was at it stripped the hubs and had them powder coated. I searched forever to try and find an easy way to get the cush drives out - Here's what I ended up doing, worked great!

Find a metal rod that just fits inside the hole of the cush drive bushing.
Fill the bushing and space behind with wheel bearing grease.
Heat the hub around the bushing with a propane torch.
Put the rod in the bushing and smack it as hard as you can with a sledge hammer (make sure the back of the wheel is supported in a way that you don't damage anything on the wheel or the shop).
Re-fill with grease and repeat.

About half of my bushings moved 1/8-1/4" on the first hit. Some needed a bit more persuation. It takes some time, and is a bit messy, but works really efficiently. After a few hits they pop out. This seemed an easier method to me than cutting out the rubber and grinding out the metal sleeves.

Now...getting the new ones in...that's another story....:D
 

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I faced this drama a few years back and just gave up, so I sanded them and used rattle can paint and clear coat and they ended up looking really good. I don't understand the grease approach as there are so many holes for the grease to ooze out, but if it works it works. You can also access the back of the cush drives and I imagine you can pound them out from behind but only if you heat the hub.
 

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FWIW, I've powdered lots of wheels, but when it's my own bikes, I usually just paint them. Done properly, it's more durable than you think. Of course, it helps if your tire guy knows how to treat the wheels properly because chips are a pain in the ass. Sometimes I'll paint a black bead on the edge of the rim so that if they do chip it, it's much easier to touch up black then other colors, especially candys.
 
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