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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to buy a 2017 Multistrada 1200S and found a few good deals here in Las Vegas, but have a few questions. Currently owns a 2016 MV Agusta Turismo Veloce Lussso. I love the Turismo. Is packed with a lot of extras and is really fun to ride. My only concern is parts availability from MV Agusta. It takes months sometimes to get parts and in 2 occasions the bike was parked for 2 months awaiting parts. This is a daily driver and need parts faster than 2 months. During the 1.5 years of ownership they had to replace a radiator, fuel tank, fuel level sensor, clutch switch, sprag clutch (twice). Currently waiting on all 4 turn signals and a oil pressure switch. As you can see that is more parts on 1 bike than I ever had to replace on my 17 bikes prior to this one together. I use my bike on a daily basis, so I'm looking If some one can help me answer a few questions before my purchase. I have search around the forum and still have a few questions.

Keep in mind this is for a 2017 1200S

1. Reliability and good parts availability in the US?
2. Have Ducati work out the bugs on the keyless system?
3. Is engine heat manageable or is as bad on your crotch as some reviewers said? I live In Las Vegas and it gets hot.
4. I cannot believe a $20K plus bike does not have a quick shifter/blipper.
5. Is heated grips still an issue on the 2017? Not hot enough and going bad often?

Thanks in advance
 

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1. Reliability and good parts availability in the US? - Seems pretty decent to me. Fuel sensor is still an issue... You can get parts from Italy in a couple of weeks if the Italians are not on vacation. With MV, the factory workers are probably drawing up plans for restructuring and reviewing financing plans so they probably don't have much time to actually work in the factory...
2. Have Ducati work out the bugs on the keyless system? - Had no issues...
3. Is engine heat manageable or is as bad on your crotch as some reviewers said? I live In Las Vegas and it gets hot. - I live In Houston and the bike does not seem to get too hot
4. I cannot believe a $20K plus bike does not have a quick shifter/blipper. - Me neither... 1260 does though... PS: Watch out for cranky Australians if you're going to say stuff like this...:grin2:
5. Is heated grips still an issue on the 2017? Not hot enough and going bad often? - Seemed fine to me, but I don't ride much when it's really cold.
 

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heat

I love the bike, BUT!!!!! heat is definitely an issue. I'm probably going to take some heat on saying this! HAHA, but pretty much every pair of pants I have worn during the summer during commuting have some kind of heat spots/damage/melting on them, this is for the lower left leg only. I would not advise riding the bike without full boots during the summer months. The main problem is the CAT. If you can get rid of that then heat is a lot less. Never had this issue on any other bike I have owned, and I've owned lots!

Still, great bike, love riding it, just any kind of slower riding in traffic and you will hate it.
 

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Heat is absolutely an issue if you're in stop/go conditions... if temps are over 90 and you're sitting still the bike is going to get VERY uncomfortable in a matter of minutes. At a US/Canada border crossing (45 minute wait) I ended up shutting the bike off between moves (and it was only in the 90's).

At highway speeds heat is not a problem in my experience (which is up to 110f in Anza Borrego)... sure it's hot but the bike isn't making the heat worse.
 

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I have not experienced much of the heat issue, particularly when compared the the Aprilia or other bikes I have owned. Of course, I don't have the cat on there either, so that probably helps a lot. The Multi is actually by far the most comfortable bike I have owned.

I have had some issues, like stranding me in Amarillo when the steering would not unlock. I also had the suspension ECU take a dump, but generally it has been like any other Ducati, or any other bike I have owned. Non of them have been flawless, but this one has been the most fun!
 

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I'm looking to buy a 2017 Multistrada 1200S and found a few good deals here in Las Vegas, but have a few questions. Currently owns a 2016 MV Agusta Turismo Veloce Lussso. I love the Turismo. Is packed with a lot of extras and is really fun to ride. My only concern is parts availability from MV Agusta. It takes months sometimes to get parts and in 2 occasions the bike was parked for 2 months awaiting parts. This is a daily driver and need parts faster than 2 months. During the 1.5 years of ownership they had to replace a radiator, fuel tank, fuel level sensor, clutch switch, sprag clutch (twice). Currently waiting on all 4 turn signals and a oil pressure switch. As you can see that is more parts on 1 bike than I ever had to replace on my 17 bikes prior to this one together. I use my bike on a daily basis, so I'm looking If some one can help me answer a few questions before my purchase. I have search around the forum and still have a few questions.

Keep in mind this is for a 2017 1200S

1. Reliability and good parts availability in the US?
2. Have Ducati work out the bugs on the keyless system?
3. Is engine heat manageable or is as bad on your crotch as some reviewers said? I live In Las Vegas and it gets hot.
4. I cannot believe a $20K plus bike does not have a quick shifter/blipper.
5. Is heated grips still an issue on the 2017? Not hot enough and going bad often?

Thanks in advance
I had a TV (base version) - loved that bike. I put 7K trouble-free miles on it other than it running hot, particularly in stop and go traffic. I just had the 9K service on my '17 Multi (traded the MV for it as I do a lot of 2-up and the MV didn't have a top box and could be a bit of a handful 2-up). The Multi is not as light/flickable as the TV but it certainly is more fun that most of the bikes out there IMHO. As for your questions, my experience:

1. no reliability issues so far. A couple of recalls (radiator hose and Brembo master cylinder). My dealer has been able to get parts pretty quickly. I know some KTM guys who are still waiting for their Brembo parts (same recall).

2. my keyless was spotty at first. My dealer replaced the fob under warranty, evidently they updated it. The good news is you can still start the bike with the PIN code.

3. I had a full Termi setup with race map installed. That helped with the heat (the cat is a significant source). It will get warm around town, but I'm always in full gear so I don't feel the direct heat so much. I haven't had any overheating problems, can't say that about my MV. I'm in SoCal, and certain places here gets hot, though not quite as consistent as Vegas-hot. But I've ridden in triple digits - just have to stay hydrated.

4. My TV had the QS, as did my GSw and my current KTM SA-S. Of the three, the MV was the best of the bunch, with the BMW one being bordering on useless upshifting, mostly good down. The KTM is in between. Frankly I don't use it that much, usually only when I need a quick downshift. I still enjoy using a clutch. One thing I did with the Multi which I highly recommend is swapping in an Oberon clutch slave. Bit less resistance.

5. my heated grips have been fine - work like they should. So far everything has been well-behaved, though I am only getting about 5K out of a rear tire. But that's with a lot of 2-up and a good chunk of spirited riding in the hills.
 

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I had a TV (base version) - loved that bike. I put 7K trouble-free miles on it other than it running hot, particularly in stop and go traffic. I just had the 9K service on my '17 Multi (traded the MV for it as I do a lot of 2-up and the MV didn't have a top box and could be a bit of a handful 2-up). The Multi is not as light/flickable as the TV but it certainly is more fun that most of the bikes out there IMHO. As for your questions, my experience:

1. no reliability issues so far. A couple of recalls (radiator hose and Brembo master cylinder). My dealer has been able to get parts pretty quickly. I know some KTM guys who are still waiting for their Brembo parts (same recall).

2. my keyless was spotty at first. My dealer replaced the fob under warranty, evidently they updated it. The good news is you can still start the bike with the PIN code.

3. I had a full Termi setup with race map installed. That helped with the heat (the cat is a significant source). It will get warm around town, but I'm always in full gear so I don't feel the direct heat so much. I haven't had any overheating problems, can't say that about my MV. I'm in SoCal, and certain places here gets hot, though not quite as consistent as Vegas-hot. But I've ridden in triple digits - just have to stay hydrated.

4. My TV had the QS, as did my GSw and my current KTM SA-S. Of the three, the MV was the best of the bunch, with the BMW one being bordering on useless upshifting, mostly good down. The KTM is in between. Frankly I don't use it that much, usually only when I need a quick downshift. I still enjoy using a clutch. One thing I did with the Multi which I highly recommend is swapping in an Oberon clutch slave. Bit less resistance.

5. my heated grips have been fine - work like they should. So far everything has been well-behaved, though I am only getting about 5K out of a rear tire. But that's with a lot of 2-up and a good chunk of spirited riding in the hills.

Looked at your websites. You do a lot of cool shit!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I had a TV (base version) - loved that bike. I put 7K trouble-free miles on it other than it running hot, particularly in stop and go traffic. I just had the 9K service on my '17 Multi (traded the MV for it as I do a lot of 2-up and the MV didn't have a top box and could be a bit of a handful 2-up). The Multi is not as light/flickable as the TV but it certainly is more fun that most of the bikes out there IMHO. As for your questions, my experience:

1. no reliability issues so far. A couple of recalls (radiator hose and Brembo master cylinder). My dealer has been able to get parts pretty quickly. I know some KTM guys who are still waiting for their Brembo parts (same recall).

2. my keyless was spotty at first. My dealer replaced the fob under warranty, evidently they updated it. The good news is you can still start the bike with the PIN code.

3. I had a full Termi setup with race map installed. That helped with the heat (the cat is a significant source). It will get warm around town, but I'm always in full gear so I don't feel the direct heat so much. I haven't had any overheating problems, can't say that about my MV. I'm in SoCal, and certain places here gets hot, though not quite as consistent as Vegas-hot. But I've ridden in triple digits - just have to stay hydrated.

4. My TV had the QS, as did my GSw and my current KTM SA-S. Of the three, the MV was the best of the bunch, with the BMW one being bordering on useless upshifting, mostly good down. The KTM is in between. Frankly I don't use it that much, usually only when I need a quick downshift. I still enjoy using a clutch. One thing I did with the Multi which I highly recommend is swapping in an Oberon clutch slave. Bit less resistance.

5. my heated grips have been fine - work like they should. So far everything has been well-behaved, though I am only getting about 5K out of a rear tire. But that's with a lot of 2-up and a good chunk of spirited riding in the hills.

Thank you.

So I did my test ride. First of all the dealer only does a guided test ride with one of their employees leading the ride. Second is a 5 min test ride around 2 blocks with no highway, so I ask to do it twice. I wanted to test at highway speeds to check for wind protection and confort. So here are my thoughts comparing to my Turismo Veloce Lusso

My thoughts on the bike.
1. Confort - The reach to the hand bars is a stretch for me. Seat confort, cannot really tell as I was able to ride for 10 mins only. Reach to the pegs was fine. The rider triangle on my Turismo is a bit tighter, with the bars closer and the seat feels more confortable in the turismo. I do not do 2 up very often to be concern with a top, but I do want one anyway.
2. Engine - lots or power, but it take to be high in the RPM to feel it. keep in mind that I was able to ride in Urban mode only and I could not change on the fly like I can do on my Turismo. I'm pretty sure in other modes the bike would response different.

Conclusion

I will eventually buy a multistrada once I start doing more 2 up riding. the dealer had a great deal on a 2017 1200S touring new ($16,999), then they added $900 for set up, another $900 for freight and $599 for doc fees. Adding $2,400 not counting taxes yet. I personally thought that is a little too much and they are trying to make up on those fees for the cut on base price. I think that was the main reason I did not end up buying. On principle. I do think $19,400 out the door still a decent price. I just do not like those type of practices. But for now I'm keeping my Turismo Veloce. It is a little more fun to ride, and that 3 cylinder engine is awesome and I like my quikshifter, GPS data logger.
 

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Thank you.

So I did my test ride. First of all the dealer only does a guided test ride with one of their employees leading the ride. Second is a 5 min test ride around 2 blocks with no highway, so I ask to do it twice. I wanted to test at highway speeds to check for wind protection and confort. So here are my thoughts comparing to my Turismo Veloce Lusso

My thoughts on the bike.
1. Confort - The reach to the hand bars is a stretch for me. Seat confort, cannot really tell as I was able to ride for 10 mins only. Reach to the pegs was fine. The rider triangle on my Turismo is a bit tighter, with the bars closer and the seat feels more confortable in the turismo. I do not do 2 up very often to be concern with a top, but I do want one anyway.
2. Engine - lots or power, but it take to be high in the RPM to feel it. keep in mind that I was able to ride in Urban mode only and I could not change on the fly like I can do on my Turismo. I'm pretty sure in other modes the bike would response different.

Conclusion

I will eventually buy a multistrada once I start doing more 2 up riding. the dealer had a great deal on a 2017 1200S touring new ($16,999), then they added $900 for set up, another $900 for freight and $599 for doc fees. Adding $2,400 not counting taxes yet. I personally thought that is a little too much and they are trying to make up on those fees for the cut on base price. I think that was the main reason I did not end up buying. On principle. I do think $19,400 out the door still a decent price. I just do not like those type of practices. But for now I'm keeping my Turismo Veloce. It is a little more fun to ride, and that 3 cylinder engine is awesome and I like my quikshifter, GPS data logger.
The freight and setup are standard for a lot of dealers, but some won't charge it depending on how badly they want to move the bike. If they have 2017s in stock, they're going to get more and more aggressive to clear them out.

If you didn't get above 5K on the engine, you didn't feel much of what the Multi has to offer, particularly with the stock exhaust and map. I could run out of steam with the TV on certain roads/places (in lower gears of course :D), the Multi would pull way past it. The MV triple is a great motor though.

The Multi has very different feels between modes, even when they are in the default settings. Sport tightens up the suspension significantly. I changed the engine map to "high" in all modes as I want consistent throttle response, and I tweaked the DWC and TC a bit in the modes. But usual MO is to run touring to get to the fun roads, then switch to sport on the fly when it gets interesting. Cruise control implementation is way better on the Duc than the MV as well.

As I said, the TV is a great bike. I kinda didn't fit it though - I'd have to kick my knee out to shift due to the cutouts on the tanks. But I enjoyed my 7K on the bike.
 

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Urban mode is the absolute worst choice the dealer could make if they actually want to sell the bike. The suspension defaults to stupid soft, the motor power output is limited to 100hp, and the throttle response is mushy as hell.

I put my bike in urban mode exactly ONCE in 40,000 miles... rode for 5 minutes... thought to myself "why would anyone ever use this mode" and have never looked back. (I've thought about reconfiguring it to do something useful but I find Touring and Sport work for 98% of riding conditions, and the last 2 percent (soft stuff) enduro does the trick.

Go in again for another test ride, let them set it to urban but switch to sport as soon as you're moving and they can't observe.
 
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Urban mode is the absolute worst choice the dealer could make if they actually want to sell the bike. The suspension defaults to stupid soft, the motor power output is limited to 100hp, and the throttle response is mushy as hell.

I put my bike in urban mode exactly ONCE in 40,000 miles... rode for 5 minutes... thought to myself "why would anyone ever use this mode" and have never looked back. (I've thought about reconfiguring it to do something useful but I find Touring and Sport work for 98% of riding conditions, and the last 2 percent (soft stuff) enduro does the trick.

Go in again for another test ride, let them set it to urban but switch to sport as soon as you're moving and they can't observe.
I live in Florida, so Urban mode is my default "rain" mode, and it's perfect for that. I have no concerns in the wet in Urban mode, with all the nanny settings dialed up. Also, I'm military and required to do an MSF course every five years. Just had to "refresh" with the Advanced course a few weeks ago, and Urban mode was perfect for that. Almost cheating, it was so easy in Urban mode.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

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I will eventually buy a multistrada once I start doing more 2 up riding. the dealer had a great deal on a 2017 1200S touring new ($16,999), then they added $900 for set up, another $900 for freight and $599 for doc fees. Adding $2,400 not counting taxes yet. I personally thought that is a little too much and they are trying to make up on those fees for the cut on base price. I think that was the main reason I did not end up buying. On principle. I do think $19,400 out the door still a decent price. I just do not like those type of practices.
I just left working for a dealer for the past 3 years, and all I can say is "holy shee-it, that's steep!". $900 freight? Ludicrous. Sure, dealers pass that charge along to the customer because they get charged, but not THAT much. $900 set up? I get it, live humans prepare it for the showroom floor and they deserve to feed their families. Not $900 worth of setup on that bike. I thought places here were steep with their $399 doc/admin fee, but $599?! Yeah I think you did the right thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all your help. I'll stick around here to keep learning about the Multistrada as eventually I'll be an owner.
 
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