Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm gonna pull my Vince when my bike gets back from paint (have to actually, to find a welder, tiny hole lol). I'm thinking I'll use ceramic tape on the ports (ie the first part of the exhaust, connected to that en-gine thingamajigie) and polish the rest. I'm a painting person, not very knowledgable about metals, so I'm not sure what to do.

Should I just do a good spirits cleaning and remove any obvious stuff with a polishing bit/sandpaper etc. on the dremel, then hand-sand the whole pipe with 1500 and then...well, what? That's the part I'm lost on.

Grinder with a buffing wheel and polishing compound?

Mercy Buckets!
Shawn
 

·
Mayor of Simpleton
Joined
·
4,875 Posts
If you're going to do it, get a bench grinder/polisher. Shouldn't have to take it down any further than 800 grit or so before taking it to the buffing wheels.
 

·
Premium Member
2004 998S FE, 2000 748B, 1986 750 F1
Joined
·
2,404 Posts
+1 to the bench grinder/polisher although ours is on a pedestal.

Husband whose job it is to polish exhausts never uses sandpaper of any kind, to clean them up prior to buffing we just pull the system off the bike, I duct tape up the carbon fibre bits of the muffler and then spray oven cleaner on the stainless bits leave for recommended time (see instructions on can) and hose it off. Works a treat. Note Oven Cleaner is highly caustic, remove the bits you want to polish completely from bike cos you don't want this stuff on any other bits its yucky. Also it is good to be in an area with good ventilation its a bit fumy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
When it comes to sanding it depends on how grainy your metal is I am assuming there stainless. If there rough start low 220 and work your way up to
1500. By the time you get to 1500 they will be nice and shinny. Then hit them
with the buffing wheel white rouge then red.
They will look like chrome but they won't last the pipe coming out of the rear cylinder will change colors, and the rest of the pipes will turn brown. Follow up with routine metal polish and they will look great forever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
It's just going to change back to the golden hue after a weekend at the track, but for 10 miles it should look great.
Wrapping the head pipes is a good idea, but where then are you shoving your heat? Correct back into the second half of your system. Last one I polished lasted 1 track day, and back to a light golden hue.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Just wanted to chime in quickly from work, thanks guys. I'll read and reply when I get home tonight, seems all the answers are here:) Thank you:)

Yep, I need to buy a bench and grinder...and vice for that matter for other things. And find a stainless steel welder person...

Shawn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Shawn, if you want a polished look that'll last forever then get your pipes ceramic coated.

Results are great and it doesn't cost that much to do. It'll insulate better than tape too.

You can get a variety of colors but the polished coat is the nicest IMO:

Hey Matt. I'm a bit confused, I thought ceramic coating was something like powdercoating, in that it is a pigmented process - are these shots of a polished pipe that has some sort of 'clear' ceramic coating? Cuz I'll definitely do that if that's the case...I'd like to stick to the metal finish:) Excluding the short pipes by the ports, which I'll definitely do properly now, ceramic coating, not tape. I think I'll go pink:) Kidding...

I just want my frigging bike, been almost 2 weeks and my throttle hand is getting hardening of the arteries here...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Wow there's enough info in this post that my options are now unlimited. Thanks everyone! I'll ask specific questions when my bike is back from paint and I have the exhaust in my hands...

This ain't worth a new thread, can I use this to keep the rust out this winter...I have a very rotting wooden garage with lots of temp flucts in toronto, and I'm by the lake...some of my take offs are already rusting so I want to protect the bike:

http://www.carvaluesplus.com/carbag_concept.htm

I know it's big, but I could find a butcher who has a cow on sale at the same time and have all the burgers I need next summer!

(I'm serious about the bag, joking aside...)


:)
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
9,757 Posts
Hey Matt. I'm a bit confused, I thought ceramic coating was something like powdercoating, in that it is a pigmented process - are these shots of a polished pipe that has some sort of 'clear' ceramic coating? Cuz I'll definitely do that if that's the case...I'd like to stick to the metal finish:) Excluding the short pipes by the ports, which I'll definitely do properly now, ceramic coating, not tape. I think I'll go pink:) Kidding...

I just want my frigging bike, been almost 2 weeks and my throttle hand is getting hardening of the arteries here...
IIRC unless you specify a color the ceramic coating has a metallic look, and after it has cured they polish it by sticking it in a vibrating bin full of some kind of abrasive material.

IMO that's the only logical way to go with an exhaust. No matter what you do with your bench grinder the results will never be as good as a ceramic coat, nor will your finish be as durable. And don't forget, ceramic coating actually serves a functional purpose as well.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
unM0derator
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
The metallic ceramic coating has aluminum particles in it, and will need minor polishing over time to stay shiny. It oxidizes, albeit more slowly, like straight polished aluminum.

I talked with one powder-coater that stopped doing the aluminized finish because people would come back in a couple of months and complain that the finish had dulled and blamed him for sloppy work. Even after educating the customers about the upkeep, it still was a hassle...so no more.

It does look nice, and I was thinking about it for my exhaust on the SC, but I will probably go the brushed Inox route because I think the aluminum is a little too shiny for my taste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Well after almost $200 in dremel bits and about 25 hours of labour, Illl never do this again. I'll do a ceramic coating at the beginning of next season.

What a PITA lol!

But it's clean now/no crap on it to get me through cold winter storage when I put her away in a week or two. I also did the partial/equalized ceramic wrap. No one said it would smoke like the bike was about to blow up...wowzers (I was told to wet it for 15-20 minutes) - great idea but I thought the fire department was gonna come...again. This time they would have put me in jail! :):):)

I also tried Easy-Off per above. Three times for 25 minutes each time. Did nothing.

For those who want to polish their exhaust, go the czech route, and have it coated!

Shawn
 

·
Mayor of Simpleton
Joined
·
4,875 Posts
Dremel?!?!?!

You deserved the 25 hours of torture. Fork over the money for a bench grinder brother!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Dremel?!?!?!

You deserved the 25 hours of torture. Fork over the money for a bench grinder brother!
Actually I spent more money on bits than a grinder would have cost...but...have you seen my garage LOL? It's not exactly conducive to doing any kind of work...tiny and gross LOL.

Also, it's been a question of sticking to what I know (tiny tools, Dremel vs. grinder etc. - I've never been a wrencher before this bike) , but after this, a bench grinder is definitely in order.

My subframe arrived, in the wrong colour LOL (black) but I wanted it just bare metal...so a bench grinder will knock that down to the aluminum in minutes...a Demel? Hours!

Matt - check you PMSes dude. edit: and stop being right. I LIKE learning the hard way...:S

Shawn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Can you do a full coating in plaid? I'm Scottttttttish afterall...

:eek:
 

·
Mayor of Simpleton
Joined
·
4,875 Posts
Umm, I'm all about the right tool for the right job, but a bench grinder is no way to remove the paint from an aluminum subframe. Media blasting is the way to go for that (walnut shell, most likely). Otherwise, regular old sandpaper and doing it by hand. Again, after its done, you would wish you had just spent the ten or twenty bucks to have someone blast it. Probably get an even better deal if you have some guy blast then powdercoat.
 

·
Mayor of Simpleton
Joined
·
4,875 Posts
...Which reminds me: "Fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life, son."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Umm, I'm all about the right tool for the right job, but a bench grinder is no way to remove the paint from an aluminum subframe. Media blasting is the way to go for that (walnut shell, most likely). Otherwise, regular old sandpaper and doing it by hand. Again, after its done, you would wish you had just spent the ten or twenty bucks to have someone blast it. Probably get an even better deal if you have some guy blast then powdercoat.
nono...sandblasting is the way to go, for sure.

My point is always about trying to do it myself. When I can do it professionally (usually that means change a cosmetic piece lol) I do.

Have you ever sandblasted anything? I have and lemme tell you it's gross. You get sand in your brain and sneeze it for three days.

I actually left the subframe at work today so I can take it home on the transit system and hit the car lot up the street from me to sandblast it.

See? I ain't stupid, much as I try to be:D

Which brings us back to the grinder...which I haven't bought yet...for reasons like this...:D
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top