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Guzzi needs to hire Terblanche yesterday. Those concepts are very good (not sure about the unsprung weight on the red one though). I have been waiting for Moto Guzzi to rekindle its sporting heritage for more than 30 years and, to my eye, PT looks like the guy to do it for them.
 

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It's unfortunate the one time he went balls out wild, was with the most delicate design change in motorcycling history.

I like them more in retrospect, especially the Hypermotard. GEN1 looks AMAZING
 

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I was poking around on the internet last nite and found Mr. Terblanche's website. There are nice photos of some cool bikes he designed, among them are Moto Guzzi projects I'd never seen before.
Guzzi needs to hire Terblanche yesterday. Those concepts are very good (not sure about the unsprung weight on the red one though). I have been waiting for Moto Guzzi to rekindle its sporting heritage for more than 30 years and, to my eye, PT looks like the guy to do it for them.
Those Moto Guzzi Concepts were Terblanche's greatest disappointment of his career (he said that on an interview).

The man was allowed to work on crazy projects when in Ducati and take them to the shows (on those days Ducati made Sportbikes only). If public response was positive, Ducati would put money on those projects to produce the concept bikes. That is the reason why concepts like the MH900e and the 1st gen Hypermotard went into the production line. Terblanche was in Motorcycle Designer's Heaven without knowing it.

He left Ducati because he was given the burden of doing more management tasks and he wanted to focus on design. He left Ducati and went into Piaggio Group where his Pal Miguel Galuzzi had become Design Director. That's when he received green light to work on the MG concepts on his website portfolio.

Unfortunately, Piaggio Group's top executives had previously understood with the MGS-01 that there was no way of making a competitive power plant from MG's traditional engine configuration. So they decided that MG would be a retro styled brand and that Aprilia would be the Modern/High Performance brand.

When Terblanche's MG concepts were applauded by public and critics on their presentation show, he assumed that Piaggio would produce those bikes (As Ducati would have done). But Piaggio Group's executives just said "No", breaking Terblanche's heart and making him resign.

I am a big fan of Terblanche and feel sorry for him. His career has gone downhill since then.
His designs are controversial, but IMHO he is one of the all time greats.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Anyone have any info on that offshore powerboat he evidently designed. Man, does that look cool!
 

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Epic. That first gen hyper 1000 sure does have a certain je ne sais quoi
 

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It's kind of a rite of passage to beat up on PT here. And, I have certainly been one of those who have. Back in '98 I saw his version of the Supersport due to be sold in '99 and I ran to buy a new '97 SS/SP. However, over the years I have mellowed. I think PTs thinking was that he was going to develop a revolutionary design to replace the original 916 rather than evolve it. In my opinion that was a BIG mistake. He could have evolved it ala Porsche 911 but, no, he had to make a statement. In the end Tamburinni over at MV Agusta took the former approach. IMO his is a nicer design. Over the years I have come to like the 999 but it's no 998. As for the Supersport, PT basically took the Supermono design, tweaked it and created a street version. I've come to like that as well. So, for me, it's a mixed bag. What is sad to me was Ducati's attempt to go back in the direction of the 916 but ending up designing a new Yamaha R1 in the 1098 and now the new Supersport. As for the Multi....that was one of the uglier designs of the times IMO. Then again I'm just not a fan of the whole "Adventure bike" genre.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think PT was really on to something with the 999, only most of us didn't know it (and didn't like it) when it first arrived. After reading Cathcart's book on the 999 and seeing the bike in person many times (each time "getting" it a little more), I've really come to appreciate what he did--a total redesign of an iconic bike from the inside-out, outside-in, and any other way possible. After thinking I was going to buy a 748 I decided I liked the look of the 749 better. The adjustability of the riding position was also a plus. A bonus turned out to be how much easier it is to work on. The **9 has aged extremely well as it was so far ahead of the curve. His original drawings were more beautiful than the production bike--some of his ideas either didn't translate well to production or were too expensive. Even if you don't particularly care for the designs of Terblanche, you gotta give the guy credit for what he did, IMO.
 

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I think PTs thinking was that he was going to develop a revolutionary design to replace the original 916 rather than evolve it. In my opinion that was a BIG mistake. He could have evolved it ala Porsche 911 but, no, he had to make a statement. In the end Tamburinni over at MV Agusta took the former approach. IMO his is a nicer design. Over the years I have come to like the 999 but it's no 998. As for the Supersport, PT basically took the Supermono design, tweaked it and created a street version. I've come to like that as well.
I think PT was really on to something with the 999, only most of us didn't know it (and didn't like it) when it first arrived. After reading Cathcart's book on the 999 and seeing the bike in person many times (each time "getting" it a little more), I've really come to appreciate what he did--a total redesign of an iconic bike from the inside-out, outside-in, and any other way possible. After thinking I was going to buy a 748 I decided I liked the look of the 749 better. The adjustability of the riding position was also a plus. A bonus turned out to be how much easier it is to work on. The **9 has aged extremely well as it was so far ahead of the curve. His original drawings were more beautiful than the production bike--some of his ideas either didn't translate well to production or were too expensive. Even if you don't particularly care for the designs of Terblanche, you gotta give the guy credit for what he did, IMO.
Tamburini and Terblanche had two different design approaches for the SBK and SS series:

Tamburini was inclined to make beautiful bikes that performed well.
Terblanche was inclined to make great performing bikes that looked nice.

One of Terblanche's mandates in designing the 999 was to make the bike easier to ride than its Tamburini-designed predecessors. And according to "Sport Rider" Magazine (and 3 WSBK titles) he succeeded: https://www.sportrider.com/ducati-999-style-or-substance#page-11

He is also responsible for the best performing Supersports ever. The 1999–2007 generation had many design improvements over the previous generation. The distinctive air intakes at the front, that help the rear vertical cylinder run cooler is an example.

Yes, Tamburini's MVs are beautiful to watch. As were his Ducati Paso and his Bimota DB1. But neither were top performers. The 916 was his masterwork. It had the best of both worlds (performance and beauty), but designers get only one or two of those during their whole design careers.

When Pierre announced that he was going to go work for confederate motorcycles- I saw a comment along the lines of. "Great! Now he can only ruin 20 motorcycles a year!"

Lol
Terblanche's only bike at Confederate was widely praised by the specialized press.
Ultimate Motorcycling's Alan Cathcart wrote:

the whole bike represents a decisive step up... It is very evident that Terblanche succeeded in getting Confederate’s suppliers to raise their game to his levels, so that the Speedster no longer feels like a collection of parts, but a more homogeneous, more refined whole.
https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2015/06/26/confederate-x132-hellcat-speedster-review-refining-rebellion/
 

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sorry to say this boys but as tough as the confederate looks in pics and in the flesh, they are the biggest pieces of shit that iv'e had the privilege to work on. what was he thinking? its like everything was an afterthought. from the bits that have to be removed just to get at the rear wheel to the disk offset being wrong (shims needed at the back of each) to the cutting of the wiring harness due to lack of plugs to the pump unit leaking fuel from the fuel tanks that kept cracking. and more.
as for his designs, polarizing. beauty is in the eye of the beholder. love the 999, like the motard, iffy on the gt, detest his version of the 900ss. the guzzi has the perfect motor for a streetfighter but they didn't take advantage of it.
 

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I would love to see some of PT's original designs that were scrapped. IMO it is possible to evolve a design and meet the ergo and mechanical goals without losing the design thread. As I said, think Porsche 911. I happen to like the 999's later design w/o the "gills." But, the drastic change from 916 to 999 wasn't received well and, in the end, that's what makes companies profitable.
 

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Terblanche's only bike at Confederate was widely praised by the specialized press.
Ultimate Motorcycling's Alan Cathcart wrote:

the whole bike represents a decisive step up... It is very evident that Terblanche succeeded in getting Confederate’s suppliers to raise their game to his levels, so that the Speedster no longer feels like a collection of parts, but a more homogeneous, more refined whole.
https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2015/06/26/confederate-x132-hellcat-speedster-review-refining-rebellion/
When I look at a Confederate, I still see a pile of parts put together in a shed by a civilian who doesn't ride. Just like many custom bike builders.

Cathcart even agrees up to a point:

It makes it hard to ride the Speedster in something approaching anger, so that it lives up to its name, and doesn’t concord very well with its aggressive appearance. That’s because you can’t easily grip the fuel tank with your knees to help steer the bike in turns because your feet are parked too far out in front of you—fine for a chilled-out cruiser, not so good for the kind of on-road action I had always understood Confederate riders relish.

Just another custom cruiser...


Tamburini had the 916, then went on to do the MV Agustas.

Terblanche had the 999, then nothing else pleasing to look at.
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Tamburini also did the Cagiva Mito...

 

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Tamburini also did the Cagiva Mito...

IMHO the Cagiva Mito is just a small bike wearing a 916 skin.

Tamburini had the 916, then went on to do the MV Agustas.

Terblanche had the 999, then nothing else pleasing to look at.
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Really?
How about the Hypermotard, the Paul Smart LE and the Moto Guzzi Concepts at the beginning of this thread?
They were all designs revealed after the 999. Aren't they pleasing to look at?
 

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IMHO the Cagiva Mito is just a small bike wearing a 916 skin.
Youv'e obviously never ridden one a certainly don't own one.
They handle and stop like nothing else straight out the box.
Rossi won his first ever championship on a Mito
 

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Really?
How about the Hypermotard, the Paul Smart LE and the Moto Guzzi Concepts at the beginning of this thread?
They were all designs revealed after the 999. Aren't they pleasing to look at?
While I fully agree with you, you have to remember Dukerdr has a Mutlistrada. Also, don't forget the MHE. I think its the best of all appearance-wise.
 
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