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I will check them out, thanks!



Definitely no Chinese bearings! I don't cheap out on hard parts, brakes or suspension haha. I usually aim to get the highest quality parts I can and just save money by fixing or repairing anything that's salvageable. Elbow grease is cheap! :wink2::grin2::wink2:
I went down this road not all that long ago. I completely disassembled mine. Down to just the frame sitting on my bike bench and the engine on my work bench. When I did that initially, last year, I ordered all the bearings I needed at once.

Using the stickied thread on the Supersport section of the forum, I found a reference that the bearings were the same as wheel bearings from an old Fiat. I ordered some for a 1957 Fiat 500 as the size corresponded to the steering head size. The problem is, there is a 1-1.5mm difference in inside diameter despite being listed as 1" ID.

Further research revealed that 1" ID could mean 25mm, 26mm or even 26.5mm. I ended up ordering a Corse Dynamics 26mm set from Motowheels and those fit perfectly. To make life a bit easier, pack them with grease like you would normally and put them on a hot plate. I heated mine to 300 degrees and dropped them on the steering stem.

Using a 1.5"ODX12" stainless steel tube, I tapped on them until they dropped all the way to the bottom, at which point I tapped them home using the same tube. All they needed was a few taps. No major effort required. Having things within reach once you drop the bearings on is also helpful.

Mine were so bad that turning the steering head without the weight of the bike on the forks sounded like a poorly built ratchet. Now, smooth as silk through the same arc from stop to stop. Also, I'd made a spanner type socket for a steering head nut on another bike and it fit the 900SS steering nut perfectly so WIN.

I'm still a long way from riding though. Still have lots of work to do....and possibly more bearings to re-order......sean
 

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Discussion Starter #62
I went down this road not all that long ago. I completely disassembled mine. Down to just the frame sitting on my bike bench and the engine on my work bench. When I did that initially, last year, I ordered all the bearings I needed at once.

Using the stickied thread on the Supersport section of the forum, I found a reference that the bearings were the same as wheel bearings from an old Fiat. I ordered some for a 1957 Fiat 500 as the size corresponded to the steering head size. The problem is, there is a 1-1.5mm difference in inside diameter despite being listed as 1" ID.

Further research revealed that 1" ID could mean 25mm, 26mm or even 26.5mm. I ended up ordering a set from Motowheels and those fit perfectly. To make life a bit easier, pack them with grease like you would normally and put them on a hot plate. I heated mine to 300 degrees and dropped them on the steering stem.

Using a 1.5"ODX12" stainless steel tube, I tapped on them until they dropped all the way to the bottom, at which point I tapped them home using the same tube. All they needed was a few taps. No major effort required. Having things within reach once you drop the bearings on is also helpful.

Mine were so bad that turning the steering head without the weight of the bike on the forks sounded like a poorly built ratchet. Now, smooth as silk through the same arc from stop to stop. Also, I'd made a spanner type socket for a steering head nut on another bike and it fit the 900SS steering nut perfectly so WIN.

I'm still a long way from riding though. Still have lots of work to do....and possibly more bearings to re-order......sean
Awesome info! Thank you for saving me some headaches!
 

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Discussion Starter #63
OMGWTFBBQ!?!

This was not what I was expecting tonight as we prepped to work on the suspension! We were planning to rebuild the headlight but I am speechless as to this "fix"... :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

 

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This was not what I was expecting tonight as we prepped to work on the suspension! We were planning to rebuild the headlight but I am speechless as to this "fix"... :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
SMH. It isn't like that is a difficult repair to do correctly. I have a complete new head light connector sitting in my parts bin right now. I think they were around $5 for a pair of them from some vendor when I worked in a repair shop.

However, I'm not surprised. The project bike I bought is going to require that head light connector because some previous owner, or their shade tree mechanic thought it would be a good idea to wire in an HID and ballast. Idea wise, maybe not so bad....execution wise.....well.....I've seen better wiring from Motorola radio installers. Which is not a compliment to Motorola...nor their installers.

I pulled around 20 feet of wire out when I removed the crappy HID install. That's less than most Motorola jobs I had to fix. At least the Motorola guys didn't wrap their shitty install work up in 10 feet of duct tape...that would have made it too easy to find. On second thought, maybe the wiring genius was a previous Motorola employee....the wire terminals were crimped in the same manner, which looked much like the pulled out wire in your picture. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #65
SMH. It isn't like that is a difficult repair to do correctly. I have a complete new head light connector sitting in my parts bin right now. I think they were around $5 for a pair of them from some vendor when I worked in a repair shop.

However, I'm not surprised. The project bike I bought is going to require that head light connector because some previous owner, or their shade tree mechanic thought it would be a good idea to wire in an HID and ballast. Idea wise, maybe not so bad....execution wise.....well.....I've seen better wiring from Motorola radio installers. Which is not a compliment to Motorola...nor their installers.

I pulled around 20 feet of wire out when I removed the crappy HID install. That's less than most Motorola jobs I had to fix. At least the Motorola guys didn't wrap their shitty install work up in 10 feet of duct tape...that would have made it too easy to find. On second thought, maybe the wiring genius was a previous Motorola employee....the wire terminals were crimped in the same manner, which looked much like the pulled out wire in your picture. :grin2:
Unfortunately I too deal with terrible wiring jobs regularly. It boggles my mind why anyone would do this. I don't think the guy I bought it from did this. The alternative is a local shop did it and that's horrifying because it's where I was thinking about taking my Multistrada. A good reminder as to why I do my own work.
 

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Unfortunately I too deal with terrible wiring jobs regularly. It boggles my mind why anyone would do this. I don't think the guy I bought it from did this. The alternative is a local shop did it and that's horrifying because it's where I was thinking about taking my Multistrada. A good reminder as to why I do my own work.
Ya gotta remember that used bikes can be a lot like that "easy girl" at the local night club .... you never know who has "been in there" before you or what you're gonna catch!

I'm going to look over the 1996 900CR I bought a week ago pretty deeply. Seeing what I see in the pics you've posted of the headlight wiring (damn ... that sucks eggs ... y'poor bastard! .. :frown2: :frown2: :laugh: :laugh: ...) I think if it were me I would do without the factory connector all together (even a new replacement) and instead go with female flat tab connectors (aka "crimp-on female spade terminals") that I've put two layers of heat shrink on to isolate them from one another. Doing it that way will allow the use of heavier gauge wire which will reduce voltage drop (and over heating the terminations) which will also produce a brighter head lamp.

So, similar to the termination in the image I've attached to this posting. The ~red~ connector that is attached to the circuit board itself (not the one attached to the threaded post).

That would eliminate the stock plastic multi-connector and permit the use of heavier wire, as well as the use of female spade connectors that are heavier duty than what's inside of the stock plastic connector. That method also facilitates easier cleaning of the connections themselves should the future demand it.

:)

EDIT: A properly done crimp connection produces less voltage drop than if the same termination were only soldered. I crimp using a Klein F2 crimping tool, then after a proper crimping I remove the plastic insulator from the connector, and solder the crimp/wire to produce better mechanical strength. This process helps to eliminate wires being pulled out of the crimped connector when removing the connector from the male spade. A properly done crimp provides better conductivity than soldering alone. Lead/tin solder (aka "60/40") has more resistance than a properly done crimp connection, which is against popular theories. That yellow crimp connection in your headlamp was not done anywhere near ~properly~. Invest in a set of Klein F2 crimpers, they are LEAGUES better than those multi-crimp/stripping tools. The Klein F2 is about $15 bucks. Worth each cent.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Addendum to my post just previous to this one;

Below are my 30 year old Klein F2 crimpers. These days I frequently use them for making power cables for modular synthesizers.

:)
Love all my Kleins!

We got out and stripped more off the bike tonight. Getting close to pulling the motor, swingarm and forks. She's filthy, but we'll fix it all soon.





We've cleaned so much hard caked crap off but it's thick.
 

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Dayum! .... geez, some people's children, I tell you what! No respect.

It's a good thing that bike is in your hands now and receiving the reverence it deserves. Good on ya man! Keep on truckin'.

:smile2:
 

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Watching this thread for tips on my own 95 900ss/cr fixed up over this past winter. Only fix here is to get dirty. Clean, degrease, clean, and repeat :). Who lets a bike get that dirty anyway.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #71
The rear fell off!

We got some shop time tonight and got the rear end off. We'll drop the motor tomorrow and then pull the forks. After that we can clean the frame up, degrease the motor and start looking at putting things back together!

Picking it up:


Swingarm off, 1/2 an inch thick road grime and an o-ring in there from somewhere:
 

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... Swingarm off, 1/2 an inch thick road grime and an o-ring in there from somewhere:
Makes a fella want to muster knots on the noggin of the neglecter! At least a few co-co bumps on his bone dome!

My dirt bikes didn't even get that bad.

:surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Damn that is nasty gotta clean up that smegma
On it! We fought the beast and have ripped it's heart out!



I'll grab some degreaser tomorrow and we'll start cleaning it up. I'd love to pressure wash it, but there are to many seals and points of entry. We'll just take our time and do it right. Also before anyone yells at me, it's sitting on high density foam blocks.
 

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Swingarm off, 1/2 an inch thick road grime and an o-ring in there from somewhere:
That looks quite a bit like mine did!! I used a putty knife to scrape out the bigger chunks of stuff. Then I got an old tooth brush and a can of mineral spirits (paint thinner) and went to town scrubbing as well as I could.

Since you have the swing arm off, I would encourage you to inspect it very closely for cracks. I've read on this very forum about cracks around the shock mount. I've also seen pictures of a cracked pivot pinch. In my own experience with buying an old Supersport, I found my aluminum swing arm to be cracked right at the pivot point.

Where the solid cast piece meets the rectangular tube of the swing arm. Right on the welds. Invisible with the bike sitting there, or even with the swing arm off. It took removal of the chain slider and a trip through a steam cleaner to find the cracks in mine.

It was cracked across both the top and bottom welds as well as down inside weld that is hidden by the engine. I thought I'd stumbled on something but found out from a fellow forum member that his had cracked in the exact same manner and place as mine did.

It isn't something that is easy to find, specially when the entire area is covered in old flung off chain lube like the counter shaft area in your pic. Apparently though, it is more common than I'd originally thought.

Do a search for posts by T8KC and take a look at the engine stand he uses. It's simple and effective. I made one inspired by his and it's been a huge help. Alternatively, another member welded up some square tube and fabbed an adapter to mount to a standard automotive engine stand.

My engine was also filthy due to the leaking front forks. Suspension fluid coated most of it, and of course dirt and dust stick to that so it was a real mess. I've cleaned it, cleaned it again and am still cleaning crap out of it.

I had to make myself a small "shovel" out an old coping saw blade because there was so much garbage stuck in the fins of the horizontal cylinder. I literally shoveled dirt and gravel out of the top fins on it for an hour or more. Still haven't gotten all of it out either. Even found a wayward roll pin stuck in between the fins. I dunno if came from the bike or was just kicked up by the front tire.

The swing arm has since been welded. Removing the swing arm bearings was a huge PITA. I've detailed how to do that in a thread in the "Mechanical Techl" section of the forum. It's in the Hall of Wisdom sub forum should you find yourself facing that dilemma.

I've looked at mine several times and thought it would be soooo much easier to just soak the thing down in simple green and blast away with my pressure washer. And it would be....if I didn't care about getting water into everything. So, it's back to using the miniature shovel I made, and a toothbrush with some mineral spirits to get things clean enough to maybe one day use some simple green to clean it up and spray some fresh paint on the parts that need it.

Keep up the great work getting that thing clean and serviced.....sean
 
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