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Discussion Starter #1
After 6 years, I now want to sell my Ninja 300 with standard ergos and get either a used 1199/1299 Panigale or a Monster 1200R--for weekend rides on straight highways to reach the quiet country roads here in Texas.

The Panigales are my dream bike and I love their design; the Monster 1200R I've included because reviews say it's more comfortable for the street. However, I think it's uglier compared to the fully-faired Panigales. I can't stand adventure-styled bikes like the Multistrada, even those are the common ones I see in rural Texas. I'm 5'8" (173 cm) and 160 lbs (73 kg).

What makes me hesitate about pure sportbikes' riding posture is the forward, crouched position so forearms are parallel to the ground. Does that only work for racetracks as opposed to back roads, where you need more awareness of hazards (hidden driveways, bicycles, etc.)? I have noticed most sportbike riders aren't in a race tuck which I assume hurts their wrists.
 

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Except the XX9 machines, all Ducati SBK bikes are uncomfortable on the roads. Their SBK bikes are built for the track. The Monsters are comfortable, and pleasant around down, but on long rides they wear you down by the absence of a wind screen/shield. Your head is beat around for hours. Even the SBKs don't punish you like that.

I've toured the SBKs for 400+ miles per day in the past. I was younger and didn't care. I'd still be good for 300 miles these days, but if given the option I would probably take a more comfortable ride. It all depends on the roads and length of the rides.

Where in Texas are you?

With no real information, I would take the Pinagale.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Except the XX9 machines, all Ducati SBK bikes are uncomfortable on the roads. Their SBK bikes are built for the track. The Monsters are comfortable, and pleasant around down, but on long rides they wear you down by the absence of a wind screen/shield. Your head is beat around for hours. Even the SBKs don't punish you like that.

I've toured the SBKs for 400+ miles per day in the past. I was younger and didn't care. I'd still be good for 300 miles these days, but if given the option I would probably take a more comfortable ride. It all depends on the roads and length of the rides.

Where in Texas are you?

With no real information, I would take the Pinagale.
Thank you for your input. 300-400 miles is actually plenty for me. So a Monster 1200R with an aftermarket touring windscreen might do the job, if a Panigale doesn't work out for me.

I live in Houston, Texas and the best roads are in the Hill Country around Austin, so that's why I was curious how the aggressive ergos of a Panigale hold up on rides up to 5h long.

Separately I've had a few close calls which I thankfully avoided. I wasn't sure whether switching from an upright posture to a Panigale's would diminish an ability to spot hazards--like a hidden driveway where a pickup truck was speeding out of.
 

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It may be the colors you've imposed on the Texas flag ... those colors can represent a number of things, ranging from inert things such as Poland to more controversial notions such as the Northwest Territorial Imperative. That's all I can figure.
 

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Do you think you might want to try a middle weight instead of going from a Ninja 300 to a Monster 1200R or Panigale?
You want to do distance occasionally, consider the Supersport with factory removable bags. Decent power sport looks and not a no compromise track weapon. Sure people ride Panigales on the street, but generally not too far or too long, but hey, there are exceptions. But do yourself a favour get some advanced rider training first.
 

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This is my very personal opinion on this matter, it may have no relevance what so ever due to how it relates to me and perhaps me only, but who knows, you might find it helpful..
I think these things are somewhat genetically ingrained..., like what you're "meant" to ride.
I was born skiing ( Norwegian mother ) , always going fast, they only way I know how to ride a bicycle is the Tour de France style low bar, going flat out everywhere..
Since 19 years old (45 now ) I've only owned sportbikes. I love the sporty riding position. It feels weird and unnatural to ride in anything other than the full committed riding position. If the bars are upright I feel exposed and disconnected from what's happening with the bike.
I own a 996. This is a bike that has been accused of being one of the more uncomfortable bikes ever created ( if you believe the reams of bad press ). I've owned 13 various sportbikes and the 996 is the most comfortable I've ever owned. I feel intimately connected with the machine, in the exact way I need to feel with any bike worth owning. I've done countless 6-8 hr days in the saddle. I'm 6'2" and reasonable fit. I've got a strong core. On a sportbike you should be holding your weight through your core, not on your wrists. If you're holding your weight on your wrists you're compromising the stability and intended dynamics of the bike.
A person needs to honestly asses what they want from a bike and what they're capable of contributing to the intended performance envelope of that machine.
I've sat on Panigales and have been surprised at how "reasonable" the riding position is. As in, for me too upright, I'd lower the bars if I owned one
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It may be the colors you've imposed on the Texas flag ... those colors can represent a number of things, ranging from inert things such as Poland to more controversial notions such as the Northwest Territorial Imperative. That's all I can figure.
Thanks for pointing it out. I had no idea what you meant until I switched from grayscale to color (easier on the eyes when web surfing in bed).
 

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Thank you for your input. 300-400 miles is actually plenty for me. So a Monster 1200R with an aftermarket touring windscreen might do the job, if a Panigale doesn't work out for me.

I live in Houston, Texas and the best roads are in the Hill Country around Austin, so that's why I was curious how the aggressive ergos of a Panigale hold up on rides up to 5h long.

Separately I've had a few close calls which I thankfully avoided. I wasn't sure whether switching from an upright posture to a Panigale's would diminish an ability to spot hazards--like a hidden driveway where a pickup truck was speeding out of.
you might consider a streetfighter, a bit more agressive than monster positioning, but I routinely did 300+ mile rides on it. I did have a panigale which was a blast to ride but for me not comfortable for more than 150 mile rides or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Do you think you might want to try a middle weight instead of going from a Ninja 300 to a Monster 1200R or Panigale?
You want to do distance occasionally, consider the Supersport with factory removable bags. Decent power sport looks and not a no compromise track weapon. Sure people ride Panigales on the street, but generally not too far or too long, but hey, there are exceptions. But do yourself a favour get some advanced rider training first.
Oh yeah I considered that. I spent a while at the dealership a few weeks ago, comparing the SuperSport with the Panigale 1199/1299. Although the former is pretty, I definitely preferred the latter's design (along with the Monster 1200R) and exhaust note and brighter LED headlights. The SuperSport cockpit is what used to be on the 1098 from 12y ago.

I took my ERC training in the spring just before Texas locked down for COVID-19, at the same place where I took the beginner course. I spoke with the instructor about middleweight vs. larger displacement sportbike for light touring, and he suggested a GoldWing 🙄.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
you might consider a streetfighter, a bit more agressive than monster positioning, but I routinely did 300+ mile rides on it. I did have a panigale which was a blast to ride but for me not comfortable for more than 150 mile rides or so.
Thank you for sharing. Was it mainly your wrists or your overall discomfort? I wear padded cycling shorts underneath my leather suit, and that's helped me on all-day rides.

I did consider the last generation Streetfighter (both engines), however I can't stand the pinched insect looks. The Monster 1200R is the only Ducati naked whose design I love, so that's my only alternative to the Panigales.

I do love the upcoming V4 Streetfighter, however it will be several years until it gets to the price points of the used 1199/1299 I have found.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This is my very personal opinion on this matter, it may have no relevance what so ever due to how it relates to me and perhaps me only, but who knows, you might find it helpful..
I think these things are somewhat genetically ingrained..., like what you're "meant" to ride.
I was born skiing ( Norwegian mother ) , always going fast, they only way I know how to ride a bicycle is the Tour de France style low bar, going flat out everywhere..
Since 19 years old (45 now ) I've only owned sportbikes. I love the sporty riding position. It feels weird and unnatural to ride in anything other than the full committed riding position. If the bars are upright I feel exposed and disconnected from what's happening with the bike.
I own a 996. This is a bike that has been accused of being one of the more uncomfortable bikes ever created ( if you believe the reams of bad press ). I've owned 13 various sportbikes and the 996 is the most comfortable I've ever owned. I feel intimately connected with the machine, in the exact way I need to feel with any bike worth owning. I've done countless 6-8 hr days in the saddle. I'm 6'2" and reasonable fit. I've got a strong core. On a sportbike you should be holding your weight through your core, not on your wrists. If you're holding your weight on your wrists you're compromising the stability and intended dynamics of the bike.
A person needs to honestly asses what they want from a bike and what they're capable of contributing to the intended performance envelope of that machine.
I've sat on Panigales and have been surprised at how "reasonable" the riding position is. As in, for me too upright, I'd lower the bars if I owned one
This was great to read. I appreciate it.

I also cycle about 50 miles every weekend, either on a cyclocross bike with low and sporty drop-bars or a mountain bike with the flat bars. So on bicycles I'm familiar and at ease with upright and aerodynamic positioning. On motorcycles, I only have experience with upright (my current bike is a standard dressed up as a supersport).

People suggest to sit on a Panigale at the dealership, but that doesn't tell me much much vs. dodging texting drivers on the highway on it after Hour 4 with crosswinds.

I've noticed no one has raised the visibility/road awareness concern of low clip-ons as opposed to upright seating.
 

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When I lived in Houston I would go out to the hill country at least 4 times a year. I had the 748 at the time. After a few commutes out to Hunt, where I stayed, I decided to trailer. The 4 hours on I-10 gets dull. I need a sports touring machine to make that more pleasant.

When I loved in Austin I would ride the 916 then 996 down there. It was about a 2 hour commute and a little more fun.

Around Houston, Brookshire area has some ok roads, and up in the Sam Houston area.

Anyhow, other than touring and off-road, I have spend nearly all my time on a Ducati SBK. I am used to it. Before I was married I would drive the 748 between Houston and Dallas or Waco and Houston every other weekend to see my now wife.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When I lived in Houston I would go out to the hill country at least 4 times a year. I had the 748 at the time. After a few commutes out to Hunt, where I stayed, I decided to trailer. The 4 hours on I-10 gets dull. I need a sports touring machine to make that more pleasant.

When I loved in Austin I would ride the 916 then 996 down there. It was about a 2 hour commute and a little more fun.

Around Houston, Brookshire area has some ok roads, and up in the Sam Houston area.

Anyhow, other than touring and off-road, I have spend nearly all my time on a Ducati SBK. I am used to it. Before I was married I would drive the 748 between Houston and Dallas or Waco and Houston every other weekend to see my now wife.
I stay in Kerrville (adjacent to Hunt) when riding the Hill Country and Twisted Sisters, and stick to Brookshire/Sam Houston/Big Thicket when I have less time. I hear where you're coming from with regard to the 4h of boring I-10. I will get a Bluetooth headset to listen to podcasts or music since I don't have space to store a trailer or have a hitch on my sports sedan. Ideally I would have a cargo van or pickup truck to haul my bike to the riding roads far away.

I'm glad to hear you got along fine on a SBK doing Houston to Dallas often (500 miles roundtrip). I've decided that I will risk getting a used Panigale and sell it in case it doesn't work out for touring. Thank you all for your advice.
 

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5'6" in my low 60s. Panigale is fine for 500 mile days in my opinion. The bars are low, but relatively close to the seat which makes it more comfortable for shorter people. I ride Texas as my season opening ride every year (except this one due to Covid), Ride the Big Bend area for a few days, ride out of Kerrville for a few days and then go to MotoGP in Austin. I've done it on a Panigale and on a 1098R (with Heli bars) as well as other bikes. The worst thing about the Panigale in Texas is getting stuck in traffic on it. The lack of a frame, means you're essentially wrapping your legs around the cylinders. Whereas previous generations of superbikes baked your ass, the Panigales bake your crotch and ass. The only issue with visibility is on tight up hill swtchbacks where on right handers it is difficult to see up through the turns.

The big thing with low bars is proper riding technique. The bars are meant for steering inputs, not resting on. You use your core and lay your hands on the bars to steer, not to hold on or hold your body up.
 

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Thank you for sharing. Was it mainly your wrists or your overall discomfort? I wear padded cycling shorts underneath my leather suit, and that's helped me on all-day rides.

I did consider the last generation Streetfighter (both engines), however I can't stand the pinched insect looks. The Monster 1200R is the only Ducati naked whose design I love, so that's my only alternative to the Panigales.

I do love the upcoming V4 Streetfighter, however it will be several years until it gets to the price points of the used 1199/1299 I have found.
Wrist and neck discomfort on very long rides on the pani. Certainly nowhere near as bad as the 996 I had. I had no issues with seat discomfort actually never been an issue on any of my bikes, and I'm skinny and bony so a bit surprising. I've been looking at the V4 streetfighter but it just looks far too bulky to me. I like the original streetfighter and the bimita delirio much better. Hard to go wrong with any monster, bike has been around forever and is available at multiple price/performance, plus tons of aftermarket goodies available as well. Extremely comfortable riding position. I had an M750 and M800
 

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In that area of the country, I'd be more concerned about the heat roasting the nuts than the riding position!

When I had 899, I did 4-500mile a day fairly regularly. The stock seat will literally kill you. And for me, the footpegs were to low and too far back (I'm short), so I moved it up and forward a bit. Beyond that, it also handles luggage fairly well, too, if you are creative.
 
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